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From the Northeastern Section of the ACS, focusing on career management and development
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04/22/14
Negotiations. 2. Three things to avoid
Filed under: Job Offer (Situations), First Year on Job, Legal matters
Posted by: site admin @ 4:54 pm

A professional has recently received an offer for a position
that he is keen about.  He feels its starting salary may be a
little lower than market surveys  2  he has consulted recently.  
Although the job descriptions seeks a US citizen, he is not and
the offer would support his applying for immigration papers 
(either H-1B or permanent residency status)  for him and his spouse.

Even factoring in the costs for permanent residency status,
the starting salary remains a bit low, besides there is a long
service commitment after which the company no longer expects
compensation for sponsorship.

Three things should be avoided in his negotiations.
1.  Do not go into discussions without detailed preparation and
practice for what your goals are and what you want to say.

  - have a firm offer in hand
  - have a back up plan BATNA best alternative to a negotiated
agreement

Know the employer’s starting date, when first pay happens,
the job assignment, if the employer will help with relocation
and all aspects of the compensation package.
The employer only wants to do what is best for you and your
family.
If it is an international assignment other factors are likely to
be important that amount to nearly 40% increase in compensation,
including housing allowance, paying taxes, employment for spouse
and trips home while stationed abroad.

2.  Trust and styles.  Some people expect that each offer is
a negotiation based on the particular circumstances of
the offer recipient.  Others expect that good faith is exercised
by accepting the initial offer. 

Establish your family’s known needs.

Your tone and intent can be influential.  If you indicate that
you consulted an attorney or a consultant, the employer may
be turned off as this may suggest a lack of trust.

Thus, it is important to share that you only expect to receive
a fair offer of compensation taking things into consideration.

3.  Do not start without establishing the employer’s and your
negotiable items
.  Have a plan of what your concessions might
be offered and what you seek. 
Commonly offer increases are 5-15%
 
Use positive language as you avoid responding “no” or “never”
to offer elements.  Ask for the final offer in writing stating the
specifics you negotiated.

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