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From the Northeastern Section of the ACS, focusing on career management and development
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12/06/13
Job offer situations. Reasons why you might not accept an offer
Filed under: Position Searching, Job Offer (Situations)
Posted by: site admin @ 4:11 pm

There are many people with strong technical skills
and backgrounds competing for positions today.  After
you work hard to research and find a position, apply
by writing all your public relations documents,
interview in several scenarios, and then wait for
an offer.

When the offer comes, must you accept it? 

If you have competing offers, how do you choose
the best one to select?  The one with higher salary?
What other possible factors could be considered to reject
a single offer or deselect a second place offer.  This
post discusses some factors to consider.

WORK ASSIGNMENT
DANGEROUS TO YOUR HEALTH
- exposure to toxic chemicals, heat, cold, asbestos,
heavy metals, radiation, etc
- lack of personal protective equipment or procedures
to monitor health and exposures.

PHYSICALLY RISKY ENVIRONMENTS
- facilities with out of date inspections or equipment
to safeguard employees
- operations that expose you to back or foot ailments,
for example.

TOO HARD TO HANDLE ALL ASPECTS OF A ROLE OR
NO JOB DESCRIPTION OF EXPECTATIONS
- small firms, for example, with limited resources but
with ambitious plans
- what is the last person in the position now doing
- what are the job review parameters and expectations

FORMAL ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES
- is it a poor match to your skills, experience and interests
[so that you are always a step behind, trying to catch up,
with limited or no help or mentor]
- will it allow you latitude to get inside and outside
exposure, networking opportunities, training and personal
growth
- will you be asked to take a lower level assignment that
might affect your reputation
- what is the formal title; “junior” scientist or engineer
is it suitable to your experience and background?

SUPERVISOR
-  is there a good record of management, management
training displaying organization and motivational skills
-  is there a level of ease to know goals and speak frankly
about the organization and its prospects
-  good, clear answers to your questions in reasonable
time;  you feel a priority
-  would your next position possibly be her position

CULTURAL FIT
CORPORATE  CULTURE
-  do the written, spoken and acted upon values match
your personal values
-  is the pace of business and teamwork style suitable
-  ask how things get done:  could be hierarchical, could be
informal with limited or no written rules; 
-  ask to see an employee handbook;  are you comfortable

CORPORATE MANAGEMENT AND HOMOGENEITY
-  is it heavy handed where everyone speaks the same
words?
-  is there good communication with access to new or
different ideas and approaches
-  are different populations represented in management
and in departments
-  is there an authentic code of behavior and is it followed
-  did you see and feel it on your interview

CHANCE FOR GROWTH
-  how long has your supervisor been in her position
-  what was the supervisor’s career path
-  where have previous job holders gone next
-  will the position allow you to build and grow skills
and gain valuable experience

INDUSTRY EXPERIENCE
-  some leaders believe industry knowledge trumps
functional expertise, thus you start at a lower level
-  is it a “detour” or “fill-in” position

NEGATIVE PEOPLE
-  in informal conversations and discussions with your
network do you find “negative impressions” from current
and former employees
-  any signs of lack of respect

TERMS OF THE OFFER
SALARY AND NEGOTIABLE BENEFITS
-  do they meet your family’s near term and future needs
-  are you factoring in cost of living and commute distance
and time
-  confirm all the details of relocation assistance, starting
insurance dates, etc.
-  will you need short term housing and transportation

TRAVEL AND HOURS OF WORK
-  establish through questions how much personal time is
taken up by work related roles and responsibilities
-  is the cost of living and residence expectations reasonable
for you to have more than one hour commute in rush hour

NON-COMPETE AND OTHER AGREEMENTS
-   are you too restricted on your options if you leave

These are some of the items to gain information on and speak
with career consultants or mentors about.

Wikihow provides some thoughts on how you might reject an offer.

 

One Response to “Job offer situations. Reasons why you might not accept an offer”

  1. site admin Says:
    S. Shellenbarger wrote of ‘returning to a former employer’ is
    more an option these days if ‘there returner gives sound
    reasons for flip-flopping’ and ’stay… in their second stint.’

    “Movement from job to job is tolerated.”

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