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From the Northeastern Section of the ACS, focusing on career management and development
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12/06/13
Mock Interviews. Preparation and Practice before formal interviews
Filed under: Interviewing, Position Searching, Observ. Trends
Posted by: site admin @ 1:34 pm

Interviewing is a performance.  It takes preparation,
self-assessment, research, planning, practice, feedback,
and review
.  Consider the performing arts or competitive
sports as an analogy.

It is also marketing of yourself.

It is helped by actively doing it and facing the nervousness
of being on the spot and not knowing exactly what will happen
and in what order.  Yet you want to make a positive experience
while making a strong case for your candidacy.

As such, it helps to actively learn interviewing skills by
observing others.  In so doing, you can place yourself in another’s
place and assess what you would do.  You could note positive
behaviors and places where things could be done better.  In this
process you can improve your interviewing skills and behaviors.

PRACTICING AND LEARNING SKILLS IN MOCK INTERVIEWS
This week we performed a Mock Interviewing workshop in
which many attendees agreed they gained great benefit from the
big picture continuum and the very professional feedback each
mock interviewee was offered by Marisha Godek, the experienced
interview reviewer.

We chose to perform six different interview scenarios taken
from the Interviewing continuum.  Every single one had
excellent “teachable moments” that was followed by discussion
  clarifying what happened,
  shining light on nonverbal signals,
  pinpointing things to avoid,
  offering situations where improvisation was required,
  positive small talk leading to either agenda
setting or elevator speeches, and
  offering how to face challenges in problem solving and case study
interviews.

As a NACE survey reveals your technical skills, accomplishments,
abilities and acumen help you get the interview and provide ~30-40%
of the input for a hiring decision.  The remaining factors influencing the
decision include social acumen, self understanding, behavior and
interpersonal skills, working with data, computers, teams and
setting goals.

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