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04/24/07
Body Language of confidence
Filed under: Interviewing, Networking, First Year on Job, Leadership
Posted by: BlogMaster @ 9:29 am

One of the recurring themes in networking,
presenting, during interviews, and in work
situations is understanding how we can best
present ourselves and understanding how
our behaviors are perceived by others,
especially interpreting confidence.

During a one-person stage preformance, Lilli
Tomlin showed how to make an opening. 
She came out on stage smiled and
acknowledged all who were there and walked
around giving the sense of her territory. 

She started speaking, not meekly, but with full
voice which dropped down to the tone and
volume that she would use for the remainder
of her program.

These are well honed ideas for presentations. 
It is different for one-on-one conversations or
introductions. 
 - We approach people, head facing the person
and level and with hands exposed and open. 
 - Free our right hand to extend a business
greeting by shifting carried items.
 - erect body posture is important 
 - we are more comfortable trusting people with
hands exposed rather than in their pockets.

As our distance decreases, smiling and eye
contact and fixation become important. 
 - Smile for several seconds helps, but be aware
that beyond 10 seconds can be misinterpreted
with negative connotations (”too willing”,
sometimes submissive).

  - Sincere eye contact for several seconds,
while smiling increases trust signals and allows
the person to understand that you wish to interact. 
  - Blinking can interrupt the contact, just like looking
in other directions can. 
  - Men approaching men seems different
from men approaching women, in the sense
that a discrete visual contact might appear
approachable and not agressive.

When within shorter distances direct frontal
alignment can offer a straight and true
presentation of yourself to the other person.

This brief summary has been pulled from several
popular writings and are suggestive rather than
hard fact.


Dan

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