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12/08/12
Resume reviews. Be Alert to items that bother document reviewers
Filed under: Position Searching, Public Relations docs, Technicians, Alternate Career Paths
Posted by: site admin @ 10:43 am

It was a surprise when I received a resume on a second
pass from one person and on a fourth pass from
another to see some glaring issues that will
“de-rail” these applicant’s application efforts.

CASE:  BUSINESS FOCUSED RESUME
 Heading listed name, address, email, phone, but no
Internet presence.  That is possible for only very few
people these days.  For sure, reviewers, if they are
interested in you, will search you on the internet.  Help
them, give your Internet web page or LinkedIn.com
profile page.

More dramatic than the missing Internet presence followed.
While the resume did not have an OBJECTIVE or
QUALIFICATIONS, it did have a PROFILE section
right after the heading.  The profile was written with
10 ‘I phrases’ in 11-line paragraph form
offering an incredible
listing of “features without benefits”, as expressed in
marketing.

DISCUSSION
It is my experience that all resume reviewers and coaches
recommend that “I, my, or our” not be used in a resume
and most CVs.  Anywhere or anytime.  This is common
from many sources like Doyle, LizRyan and many ACS
consultants.

Equally objectionable are the use of feature phrases
without substantial benefits.  Specifically that means
do not state– results oriented (or bottom-line oriented)
professional, goal-driven, multi-tasker, reliable, flexible,
excellent communication skills, self-motivated,
team player, independent, detail-oriented or catch phrases
that are without benefits. 

 CASE:  LABORATORY SCIENTIST SEEKING NEW
OPPORTUNITIES
A second resume that I reviewed contained the heading
using a Word “header” and nebulous Objective statement:
“To seek a position in a growing company that allows me to
apply my skills in THIS and THAT.  I would like to apply my
diligence and problem solving skills to gain variable insights
in the field of WHATEVER..”

Note:  MY, I,       bad form
Note:  non-specific, “lazy-phrases”
Note:  typo “variable”  [lack of attention to detail]

When we use an Objective it should relate directly to
specific match of skills, interests and experiences the
company desires an individual to possess and you have.

Specifically look into the company to find out who they
want to hire.  Do information interviewing, committed
networking, and industry researching that pinpoints where
your working there benefits their products, business or
services.  Find the KEYWORDS that are relevant to
positions that you seek and are qualified for.

If you do not have this, or if there is more than one
position you wish to be considered for, consider skipping
the Objective, and present your case with QUALIFICATIONS.
Present the most relevant skills, experiences and interests
in your qualifications.

Make your document, especially in the “resume red zone,”
easy to read.  Consider using incomplete yet understandable
sentence fragments
Avoid inserting a bullet or a carrot for
too many things.
  Reserve their use for achievements,
results and things that place you in a prominent light.

Templated forms like Word “headers and footers” seem
to be more of a headache than a benefit.  Sure it insures
that certain information is there, but it might not be compatible
with all electronic forms and there can be too much information
that is repeated.

ITEMS:  HEADING ON PAGE 1, PROFILE, OBJECTIVE
AND QUALIFICATIONS

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