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11/21/12
Affiliations. Significance in Resumes, Interviews and Presentations
Filed under: Interviewing, Position Searching, Public Relations docs, Networking, Leadership
Posted by: site admin @ 12:48 pm

Did you see the CBS segment on human infants?  How
they are learning at their very earliest moments and
often make decisions based on what they have observed
and been taught?  Striking.

What does this have to do with Resumes, Interviewing
and seeking jobs, Dan?  you may ask.

A lot!

Short story.  A member recalled applying for a position using
Monster.com and obtained an on-site interview.  In the
interview in which he demonstrated his communications
skills and story telling ability he learned through several
mock interview experiences, he mentioned who he worked
for at UCONN
.  The long and the short of it, the hiring
manager also worked for the same professor
decades earlier.
It helped form a connection, a common-ground, and ultimately
a difference with all the other candidates.  He was offered the
position
.

BABY PREFERENCES
The video segment reported that newborns listen, like faces,
like common aged people, like languages and music they
are used to hearing.  The also form preferences from positive
experiences. 

This early preference learning extends to adult years and making
decisions.  David McClelland offers that affiliations is one
of the three leading motivations for human behavior.  The need
is associated with desires to be linked to groups, organizations
and places.

AFFILIATIONS CAN ALSO BE MORE SIGNIFICANT
Lucy Kelleway posed that today there are fewer “big
names” that signal the achievement of one person.  Achievements
are more commonly a group effort.

When people effect things it can be signaled on a webpage
or twitter or social media.  While individual achievement
does stand out, most do not do it alone.  Flashy
affiliations with big names and associations stand out.

AFFILIATION STANDS OUT IN BUSINESS
You can gain trust in customers by being in partnership or
affiliation with a known business.  Affiliation is a fast way
for businesses to gain trust and credibility in the eyes of
customers.

VALUE OF AFFILIATIONS SECTION IN RESUMES
As a professional scientist you show you care about
what is happening in your areas of science when you are
a member of the ACS.  You care enough to
-  subscribe to a code of ethics, society journals and magazines,
-  attend conferences where you share and learn and
-  take some initiative in actively being involved for the greater
good.

When you include ACS [and other pertinent organizations]
in your resume AFFILIATIONS section, it reveals a lot
when you include participation in groups, organizing
conferences, task forces and committees) since they are
voluntary and tell of your commitment to the other members
and the whole chemical enterprise.

We tell interviewees and presenters, being able to provide a
story of involvement during interviews and when delivering
presentations also reveals your professionalism in meaningful
ways in these contexts.  In a very human way it finds its traces
to our early human preferences.

One Response to “Affiliations. Significance in Resumes, Interviews and Presentations”

  1. site admin Says:
    Related to affiliations is commitment to others’s well-being. The Atlantic Monthly article by a Navy Seal a current cultural element calls it Loyalty beyond self. http://www.inc.com/brent-gleeson/what-great-leaders-have-that-good-leaders-don%2527t.html?goback=.gde_45505_member_188222584

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