The NESACS Blog
From the Northeastern Section of the ACS, focusing on career management and development
Categories:

Archives:
Meta:
August 2019
S M T W T F S
« Jul    
 123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
25262728293031
04/04/07
Mid-career Discussion: Managing “Blind-spots”
Filed under: Networking, Mentoring, First Year on Job, Recruiters, Leadership, Mature professionals
Posted by: site admin @ 9:10 am

Nancy Widmann co-authored an interesting
book recently, “I didn’t see it coming:  
The
only book you’ll ever need to avoid being
blind-sided in business.”  Everyone at some
point had an “I did not see it coming” moment.

Management or leadership organizational development
concepts can commonly be over-simplified as
either 
  core tactics - developing few principles with many variables
  compilation tactics - many principles, few variables.

MORE COMPLEX MATRIX ORGANIZATION
While recognizing these, more often the complex
structure is no longer just a two way conflict.  We
evolve to learning how to seek common goals, align
priorities, share resources in a priority order and
accept interdependence.  This is a result of the modern
view of matix organizations involving not only product
(quality, delivery and yield) and technical issues (
performance and operational issues) but also site
management and customer satisfaction metrics to
respond to as a result of increased competition. 

As a result,  most of our goals need to be developed
in combination with all four constituencies arriving at
performance that:
  focuses on results:  close the gap between current and
desired levels of output
  involves systems:  geared to be viewed from all four
perspectives
  adds value:  close the gap between current and desired
performance results
  frames partnerships:  the participation of many individuals
is integrated recognizing group priroities.

BLIND SPOTS
In this ‘brave new world’ we need to address the following 
‘blind spots’ 
  -  stay tuned to our bosses values and needs
  -  communicate better as listeners
  -  review the traditional routines and habits (what used to be
a strength can revert to a liability)

Michael Mink put the “spotlight” on these at critical junctures:
ownership change, new boss, and new position (responsibilities).
“Look out for blind spots” April 2, 2007.

Dan
  
 

Leave a Reply