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11/15/11
Interviewing. Competency based methods
Filed under: Interviewing, Position Searching, Post-docs, Undergraduate majors
Posted by: site admin @ 12:19 pm

The class of structured, behavioral-based interviews
is a general style that many organizations describe they
use to choose future employees from qualified candidates.

These are most common in situations for industrial and
governmental positions.

Last weekend during a panel discussion on interviewing,
Dr. Susan Sobolov indicated that her current firm uses
“competency based interviewing” that seeks to both define
a candidates’ behaviors and their agility in applying
knowledge, learning and thought-processes to new situations.

There is a considerable literature on competency-based
interviews, for example  “Interviewing right” Lominger
Corp. 1   To give insight to readers, questions will generally
be behavioral-based, giving each candidate the same
questions and using numeric rating scales for responses.

Competencies in four extensions of behaviors are
sought:  2 
  - strategic - what might be unintended consequences and
broader implications
  - political - sensitivity to other positions and perspectives
yet can manage making progress
  - negotiating - respects others intentions and creates
dialog promoting openness and trust while “winning
concessions”
  - teams - seeks outcomes as win-win, and promotes
excellence as the result of a well functioning team.

To prepare for competency based interviews one site
suggests asking yourself the 3-5 most meaningful
or significant events in your career, what you learned
in those events and how you have applied the insight
to other situations.

I liked the set of competency based interview questions
offered in   3  , where competency is defined as the
application of specific skills and abilities to perform
a unique job or function of a position.

Our responses remain like behavioral questions in
providing a concise story of an actual event or
situation in the STAR (situation, task, action, result)
or SARI (situation, action, result, implications)
models.

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