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From the Northeastern Section of the ACS, focusing on career management and development
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02/17/07
Presentations: Making them manageable
Filed under: Interviewing, First Year on Job
Posted by: site admin @ 8:03 am

A wonderful speaker I share the dais with at certain
workshops points to giving presentations as some
people’s worst fear…certainly among the top fears
of many people. 

Understanding what effective presenters do to
“elevate their game” may be helpful to point out
to people who go on interviews and who are in
their first year on the job…

Susan, mentioned above, has great voice control,
as she starts her message she speaks louder than
normal and enunciates clearly especially certain
hard consonants– Ks, Cs, Ts, Ds.  She also
has an interesting voice, changing her speed and
tone to suit the message.

What else?  Body language and audience analysis…
Carmine Gallo authored “Body Language:  A key
to success in the workplace” 
which offers nice tips and a slidehow with a couple
of effective shots.

Gallo covers several things I agree with in the
well conceived article:
- posture
- energy and moving around
- no barriers between you and audience
- EYE contact

In addition, please consider who is in the audience
and what it is they want, need or would benefit from.
Recently, I was asked to speak for an hour on
presentations to an audience of presenters.  What
could I really tell them that they would want to know
or benefit from?  First, I offered that audiences vary
and there is no one prescription.  However, we could
offer ‘Deft presentations’ if we were in a sense humble
and remembered that it is not so much the material
we delivered that counted, but finding out what the
audience wanted and providing that to them effectively
so that each one could use and benefit.  Get them
‘lost in the moment, part of the discussion, thinking
in the same wavelength, formulating responses,
active listeners, and participants in the presentation.’

So work on your voice, work on your body language,
and perform audience analysis for presentations. 

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