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05/21/11
Watch-outs. 26. Good ideas, Questioning ideas
Filed under: Legal matters, Observ. Trends
Posted by: site admin @ 7:38 am

When we encounter good ideas, what do we do?
Do we note them, learn from them, act on them
explore them?  Where do good ideas come from?
Three cool discussions are brought to your
attention.

LITTLE BETS
Source:  Spirit Magazine May 2011, p. 42.  Where
do ideas come from?  Citing Peter Sims book
Little Bets…,” this airline seat magazine article
offers one of five sources of big ideas– be an
experimentalist (D. Galenson, experimental
innnovators), be willing to risk taking a new course
(F. Gehry, architecture), expand the use of a good
idea (Page and Brin, Google), discover what is
out in the world (S. Blank, Stanford), and
‘Little bets.’

Little bets are practical approaches to discover
incompletely formed good ideas and nurture them
to grow.

SMOKE EATING ALUMINUM
Source:  W. Koch, USA Today, May 12, 2011,
Alcoa unveils smog-eating aluminum
Latest innovation in building products with
pollution fighting ability related in this article.
Is it a good idea?  As with many environmental
devices that are surface-reaction based, how do
you keep the surface active, clean and available. 
What is the maintenance involved?

STATISTICS:  INTERPRETATION
Source:  C. Bialik, WSJ 5-21-2011, p. A2,
“When the mean doesn’t mean what it seems.”
While there are several cross-references
that seem to confuse the discussion,
interpretation of life-and-death disease
early onset information is complicated.  We
learned in our statistics training that three
things are key in interpreting statistics–
center, spread and shape.
Too often one measure dominates all others
in discussion– the central tendency,
and an imperfect or incorrect interpretation
can result, even from experts.

Wouldn’t it be nice to learn about all three
key statistical measures?  Even MBAs learn
the interdependent nature of them, see 1  .

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