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03/11/10
Resume and cover letters. Recent observations
Filed under: Position Searching, Public Relations docs, Mature professionals, Technicians
Posted by: site admin @ 9:18 am

Recently a resume came to me with a half dozen
“I worked on…” statements.  In addition to giving
the impression of “a history project giving what
you did and where you went to school, just attach
to an email or upload to a site and press the button,”
it sends a message that the person is unprepared
to work on a team and pursue the hiring manager’s
goals.

The same resume had more bullets in the
EXPERIENCE section twenty years ago, than
in the positions, less than a year ago.  P.
Korki
authored a noteworthy article on
resumes that captures these and other common
resume weaknesses for mid-career folks.

Another recent observation that might not
serve the candidate well is indicating ‘twenty-five
years of experience in…” because the job
description states seeks a skilled
“chemist with
more than fifteen years”.  While
true and honest,
does this fit in the
“red-zone” of a resume
(middle third of front page) ?  Some may differ
with my
proposal to indicate the experience
level in the
cover letter (second or third paragraph)
and
stick to the skills and ability facts in the
resume.

On to cover letters, which should be part
of every submission.  Many arguments are
given about the advantage of writing a


customized and thoughtful document promoting

your interest in an opening.  S Needleman lists
several in her WSJ piece.  Since many hiring
managers are doctorates, it is almost ‘a given’
that the salutation should be addressed to
            Dear Dr. [Smith],
in many positions.  While many in these positions
don’t require the salutation, there
are more than
a handful that look at the “Dr. omission” like
it
is a spelling mistake.  (Lack of
attention to detail.)

Needleman further lists ways to attentively sell
your product in the cover letter in her
March 9
piece (linked above).

One Response to “Resume and cover letters. Recent observations”

  1. site admin Says:


    The resume doctor column in the WSJ pointed out
    improvements that can be built upon

    -”revamp his summary statement” to focus on what he
    can offer. In fact Garone counsels against using “summary
    statements” except where there is a change of careers.

    -”list describing areas of expertise” is next. Be careful about
    making the list too long.

    - EXPERIENCE section list of employers- reviewers may
    want to know more about them (this could be where a
    person’s Linkedin.com profile can be helpful in a
    “mouse-over pop-up”.

    - Relevant recent certifications are appropriate.

    - Team and individual awards for achievement.

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