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From the Northeastern Section of the ACS, focusing on career management and development
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02/23/10
Developing Good references
Filed under: Interviewing, Position Searching, Public Relations docs, Post-docs, Technicians
Posted by: site admin @ 5:30 am


All too often, references for job applications
are
considered at the last moment. However,
good job references can be the deciding factor
whether you will even be interviewed, in some
cases, and get the job offer after the interview
process, in others.


Developing your personal references
is a lifelong activity beginning when you are
in school.  As undergraduates, everyone must
be thinking about potential recommendations
(planning for graduate education or
professional training) or references (for
entering the job market).


WHO CAN BE A REFERENCE
The responsibility for identifying and
requesting references is on each applicant.

You can ask teachers, undergraduate research
directors and guidance counselors who have
observed your work and have seen you work
on teams to complete projects and assignments.

Coaches, staff counselors, like with college
newspaper, and administrators who have
encountered you demonstrating workplace
and leadership skills provide another facet
of you as a candidate.

WHO CAN BE A “GOOD” REFERENCE
Why the difference?  You only want people
who will honestly speak highly of you to
represent you.  In addition, it can be a strong
help to choose a reference the hiring manager
(decision maker for your application) knows.
So, this suggests that a more involved
interaction with your references can pay
dividends.

Choosing people highly respected in the
chemical field is a benefit.

Did you ever hear of Employer referral programs?
In many companies, an employee can
receive a bonus if she refers and submits a
person;s resume and application to the
appropriate manager.  Thus, this “inside”
reference is one of the best references you
can have.

The reference will be a person who knows
your strengths and be prepared to point out
to a prospective employer how you meet
the requirements for the position.

Clearly, the reference will have a current
copy of the resume you sent to the company,
an idea of the position for which you apply
and what interests you about the position.

WHERE DO REFERENCES GO IN A
DIGITAL RESUME FILE
Every effort should be made to confirm
that each person you choose as a reference
indicates that they can be a good reference
for you and be readily available.

Each name (commonly four names, minimum,
three names), and I
suggest a master list of

six from which to choose, is placed with
appropriate
contact information:
 - full name
 - current title
 - professional affiliation
 - professional address
 - profession email
 - telephone number
             relationship to you
on the List of References page.  This page
is not formally part of a ‘resume,’ but part of
your ‘resume file.’

This List does its’ job when sent to hiring
managers and contacts.  When company
officials receive reference lists with your
resume, some choose to contact people
with whom they know even before the
interview.  A number of people use the
the references list at the same time they
do due diligence on candidates with
verifying services and the Internet.

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