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From the Northeastern Section of the ACS, focusing on career management and development
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06/12/09
Finding Positions. Long tail influences
Filed under: Position Searching, Public Relations docs, Networking, Job Offer (Situations), Mature professionals, Post-docs, Technicians
Posted by: site admin @ 10:27 am

The “long tail” theory of information and searching has
been mentioned in light of one way having your blog
enhance your resume 1 or having a presence in
LinkedIn.com.  In this way, you add a “pre-filter”
to the information that is “out there.”

[the long tail, coined by Chris Anderson in Wired
magazine 2004, describes a ‘niche strategy of
businesses’ that sell relatively small quantities of
unique items.]

The long tail, a term borrowed in business, finance
and marketing and popularized in the book by
Chris Anderson, applies for professionals seeking
jobs in a world increasingly influenced by the Internet.

I found Anderson’s book most helpful in providing
a big picture and framework around the “long tail”
concept and framing the critical questions. In the
last several chapters of the book, Anderson
points out three leading elements of the creation of
long tails.
- adding population to the “tail”
- making all elements accessible
- being able to find and select what you want and need.

For job seekers one might learn about
 - where to post their professional information and
expertise and
 - what are the best ways to find and select what
you need.
Both of these are serviced by “aggregators” who
make information and ideas available and easy to
access and understand.

While he did not recommend where to list our
professional information, he did emphasize
the power of collective intelligence in gathering
information to make choices and that “search
filters” drive the search to the more specific,
lowest common denominator terms that
allows selection and amplification.  they are
either:

Pre-filters:  key words that predicts matches
Post-filters:  insights that reduce the “noise”
of the search.

This coming together of science and business
speaks to how important it is to be open
to concepts and tools used in other fields.

 

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