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07/29/08
Interview Protocol. Names, business cards, resumes, and suggestions
Filed under: Interviewing, Public Relations docs, Mentoring
Posted by: site admin @ 7:25 pm

Dear Dan,

   So I have my first on-site interview
coming
up, with
J-M, right outside
Philadelphia. I
wanted to ask you a
couple
questions.


1. When I have meetings with different
scientists
(I
already asked for and
received the list, with
names and
positions) should I
bring a copy
of
my resume for them and give them a
business
card?
One or the
other, both or none?


2. Also, how should I address them
if I don’t know
if they
have their Ph.D.
or not?

Should I assume they do and call
them Dr.
xxxx and let
them correct
me, or address them
by their first name.

Thanks again for your
help with the
mock phone
interview. it was terrific
experience and a great
learning role,
since they are bringing me in for

a site interview.

Regards,

GS

6 Responses to “Interview Protocol. Names, business cards, resumes, and suggestions”

  1. site admin Says:


    Herb Silverman offered:


    1. Bring resumes in case they ask for
    a copy, but assume they have seen
    and read your resume.

    2. Start out by addressing them as
    Mr. or Ms. I think it is more
    embarrassing to have to downgrade
    a salutation than to upgrade it.

    ** You have the names of the people,
    see if they have any recent publications,
    see if they have any history on the
    internet. If they do, be prepared to
    comment on the publications.

    ** Remember to be polite and
    friendly to each and every person.
  2. site admin Says:


    Joel Shulman offered

    · I would bring copies of resumes and
    business cards. For each person GS
    meets, he should ask for a business
    card and be prepared to give out his
    own. Each person doing an interview
    or other type of discussion should
    already have his resume, but he can
    hand it out to those who might not,
    if it looks like that would facilitate
    discussions.

    · He can find out from his host,
    whoever arranged the day schedule,
    or even from the person who does
    the first interview of the day how
    people address each other at J-M.
    I would assume that his future peers
    would be addressed by first name,
    while higher-ups should be addressed
    as Mr./Ms. unless he is told otherwise
    ahead of time.

    · He should do a quick Google search
    on everyone on his schedule, which
    will tell him whether they have a PhD
    as well as their technical backgrounds.
    He should not assume they are all
    PhDs–some may be BS/MS or even
    business types.
  3. site admin Says:


    Lisa Balbes offered

    Yes, take copies of the resume,
    and offer them to people who do
    not have one, if they bring it up.

    Exchange business cards at the end
    of each interview segment, and jot
    notes on the back of the person’s
    card as to what you talked about (if possible).

    I agree with Joel - you should be able
    to find out ahead of time who has PhDs
    by looking up their publication records,
    or in the company directory.

    I would probably go formal and call
    everyone Mr/Ms/Dr, unless told to do otherwise.
  4. site admin Says:


    Hi G,

    It is nice to hear from you especially
    with the encouraging news of an
    interview with J-M. It is a pleasure
    to share my thoughts with you on
    the questions you raised.

    RESUME, BUSINESS CARD
    “When I have meetings with different
    scientists (I already asked for and
    received the list, with names and
    positions) should I bring a copy of
    my resume for them and give them
    a business card? One or the other,
    both or none?”

    DE:G, it is generally good practice
    for any interview to bring extra
    resumes and have a plastic envelope
    of good feeling white business cards
    to hand out to interviewers.
    See the blog.nesacs.org for some
    discussion on business cards.

    J-M is a large international firm that
    likely will have a formal interview
    program for all candidates. Part of
    the program will be passing out your
    agenda, a job description for your
    position that they have “hammered”
    out and very possibly key items for
    your interview. It might be interesting
    to ask them if they planned on doing
    behavioral based questions.

    From the sound of it, they planned a
    series of individual interviews and
    very likely a thesis presentation.
    Don’t presume that everyone has
    seen or has read your resume in
    advance. Be positively ready with
    clean copies of resumes that you
    can provide, if needed.

    At the end of your conversation,
    consider passing out your business card.
    This way your interviewer will be
    encouraged to reciprocate with hers
    or his card.

    TITLES OF INTERVIEWEES
    “Also, how should I address them
    if I don’t know if they have their
    Ph.D. or not?
    Should I assume they do and call
    them Dr. xxxx and let them correct
    me, or address them by their first name.”

    DE: Certain organizations are quite formal.
    Others disdain formality. This can be
    the case for whole industries or it can
    be different for different divisions what
    an interviewee should call the interviewer.

    My suggestion is to err on the side of
    formality first. Use Dr.xxx initially and
    stand corrected. If you are not sure of
    names, after introductions, don’t be afraid
    to mention and ask for names again.
    It is better to ask than to make mistakes.

    Sometimes, formal settings change in
    social interactions, like lunch and dinner.

    It is commonly more beneficial for you
    not to be overly informal in most
    circumstances at first.

    G, how much do you know about J-M?
    It is worth your while getting some detailed
    history, current business and leadership
    information, and develop some questions
    related to understanding what your initial
    role will be– including your supervisor,
    co-workers, work location.

    Use Fidelity, Yahoo, and wikipedia to
    explore important details.
    See if J-M is in LinkedIn.com, or if
    interviewers are in LinkedIn.com…

    Hope this helps. Don’t hesitate to come
    back with more questions, if you have
    them. Let me know how it all works out.

    G, you will do well, you will enjoy the
    challenge and the wonderful opportunity
    this meeting provides for you and your family.
  5. site admin Says:


    GS,

    Rich brings up a thoughtful topic of thank
    you letters.

    Sarah Needleman wrote a long piece in
    the WSJ yesterday about remaining more
    formal and business-like in letters online
    or on page B1 (7-29-08).

    While it is important to be brief and to
    the point, more modern tools like text
    messaging and “cool” abbreviations of
    emoticons or shortened sound alike
    words should not have a place in
    thank you letters.

    Emails are emerging a acceptable. Gauge
    your medium based on how they are
    sending you information. If everything
    they send you is via email, it might be a
    good format for your thank you note.

    If everything they send you is hard copy,
    this might be the better format. Recent
    blogs talk about this topic.
  6. site admin Says:


    Rich Bretz suggested

    1 I agree with most of my colleagues. I
    would be more likely to collect business
    cards from the interviewers than hand
    them out since they have the resume,
    questions, and answers.

    2. Salutation: More formal is better in my
    opinion as it shows respect.

    ** Joel is correct - Google search. While
    Google searching notice what area the
    person has published in and try to
    anticipate connections to interviewees work.

    ** Make sure to send thank you notes to
    the host, project leader, etc. Also follow
    up on any discussions that were left incomplete.

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