The NESACS Blog
From the Northeastern Section of the ACS, focusing on career management and development
Categories:

Archives:
Meta:
July 2019
S M T W T F S
« Jun    
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293031  
11/04/07
Resume Objective: Should you have one?
Filed under: Position Searching, Public Relations docs, Mature professionals, Post-docs
Posted by: site admin @ 10:51 am

One of the first things a resume reviewer
will read is our objective, if it is in the usual
location below the heading.  It is one of
the “great resume debate issues” that a
good friend of mine has developed.  That
is his way of saying that the decision is
the resume writer’s and it depends on the
situation.
 

The blogroll lists a link to “Mature workers”
which might help a subset of readers. 
Nonetheless, there is an item about
objectives that most every
one can benefit from on
Spherion

They point out ”some guidelines to help you
determine whether an objective is right for
you.”

Situation:  career fair or a networking event
Suggestion:  resume without an objective
    This is a place where a QUALIFICATION
    statement might “open opportunity doors.”
    They need to include keywords that match
    relevant skills and abilities for positions
    in the screening companies.

Situation:  well defined position, your skills
     and and background match
Suggestion:  customize the objective
     to the specific position which you
     are applying and qualify for.
     Include a Highlights or summary
     section pointing out key features
     and proficiencies.

Situation:  applying to a company but cannot
    be specific about job you are seeking
Suggestion:  propose not including objective
    A good substitute is your QUALIFICATION
    statement including keywords that link to
    desired proficiencies found by research
    on the company and jobs available.

Situation:  applying to a company but feel
    that you may qualify for several positions
    or a range of job titles.
Suggestion:  propose not including objective
    Again this could be a situation that would
    use your QUALIFICATION statement, as
    above.

Situation:  recent graduate entering a field
Suggestion:  tailor an OBJECTIVE to meet
   the position or enter the field using
   keyword terms gleaned from other job
   listings.
   Avoid “over-reaching” or “flowery”
   creative comments.
   Consider including HIGHLIGHTS or
   SUMMARYof skills to support the
   OBJECTIVE.

Situation: changing fields to enter a new
   field of endeavor
Suggestion:  tailor an OBJECTIVE to meet
   the position or enter the field using
   keyword terms gleaned from other job
   listings. 
   MUST provide HIGHLIGHTS or
   SUMMARY of relevant skills and
   accomplishments to validate your
   candidacy.
   Could also consider substituting
   QUALIFICATION statement in place of
   OBJECTIVE.

Situation:  mid-career person trying to
   locate in specific area for undefined
   positions
Suggestion:  consider substituting a
   QUALIFICATION statement using
   keywords for narrow fields.
   Include a HIGHLIGHTS or SUMMARY
   section as above.
   Consider a final “KEYWORDS” section
   that lists different ways of describing
   expertise.  For example, NMR– MRI,
   also, process scale-up– process safety
   management.  These are terms familiar
   to specific fields.

These considerations argue that a customized,
specific resume is constructed for each position
and application.

The OBJECTIVE or QUALIFICATION statement
reveals what talents and abilities you bring to
make a profit and a difference for each company
to which you are asking for their consideration.
It needs to be keenly tuned, clearly written and
brief in easy to understand structure.

Since the OBJECTIVE can close doors, by

- revealing inaccurate information (say, asking to
be a lab manager vs. applied researcher, or
process research when you have limited skills
with the necessary components) 

- unneeded restricting the openings for which
you would like to be considered (analyst with
skills in separations vs.  analyst with strong
problem solving skills experienced in hyphenated
technologies… include the hyphenated methods
in the KEYWORD section.)

It is important to use it at the right times and
be aware that it creates a problem if not done
well.

Leave a Reply