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From the Northeastern Section of the ACS, focusing on career management and development
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08/08/07
Job Situations. New Job does not feel right
Filed under: Interviewing, Networking, Job Offer (Situations), Mentoring, First Year on Job, Mature professionals
Posted by: site admin @ 7:02 am

One of the writers I enjoy is Marilyn
Gardiner
of the CS Monitor.  She recently
wrote about considerations when a
person does not find satisfaction in
a new position shortly after starting
out.

‘Funny feelings’ that can appear include:
  - title does not match job details that
you are urged to perform, even after
you have gone through the “learning
curve” of what is involved

  - travel expectations not specified
or do not match your personal situation

  - previous employees in the new role
did not “last long” because of job duties
or situations.

  - after a short time on the job, you receive
an inadequate review of not meeting
expectations

  - unprofessional dealings that don’t
meet your standards of behavior, respect,
or honor.

Some of these could be discovered by
a detailed “background check” on the new
company before your join them.  Some
of them cannot be.

Does it matter that you change jobs
frequently, or leave after only a short
stay?  How does one express this short
stay on your resume?  Do you omit it
entirely on the resume?

This possibility should stand out as strong
reasons to develop and maintain a helpful
network, seek out mentors, and try to
establish a good relationship with your
new boss.

NETWORK
The network, both social network and
more formal contact network, could
help you explore information about the
position, boss, and company before
and while employed.  It can also help
you through the transition with the three
“i’s”– information, ideas and interviews.

MENTORS
This is where having professionals on
your side with whom you can speak
confidentially to offer your experiences
and explore alternatives is highly
valued.

PERSONAL SELF-ASSESSMENT
It is fair to say that we can have
goals in mind and change them.
The key thing is to think through
your goals and understand what 
this company will do to help you
get there.  The company is asking
the same thing of you– where do you
fit in their reaching business goals. 

For recent graduates, short term
assignments or positions can represent
a “temporary professional detour. For
those in midcareer, the consequences
can be greater.”

The author points out work that can be
done before accepting position.  The
include
  - “questions you” [need answers to]
“during the interview process”
  - trust your gut about the workplace,
the people, the stress/friendliness level
  - “ask to interview people you will
work with…,” and “the person who held
the postion before”
  - “ask about your prospective
boss’s management style”

Many times, it is not easy to learn
about the business issues that can
affect the company, especially if it is
a private equity concern.  Thus, this
is something that you should obtain
as much information as you can before
you agree to work there.  Share it with
trusted advisers and seek out their
input.

On one’s resume, my advice generally
is honesty is the best policy and learn
the hard lessons of undesirable
decisions.

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