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07/24/07
Functional Resumes
Filed under: Position Searching, Public Relations docs, Mentoring, Mature professionals
Posted by: site admin @ 6:53 am

Working on an assignment gave me a
chance to develope insights and
perceptions about functional resumes.

In addition to considering one for myself
the assignment provided a “when one
might value using it and what to include”
perspective.

First let’s frame what the functional resume
will likely include in most cases:
  Heading (all the same details as in a
traditional resume)
  Objective (possible, but not always)
  Summary of Qualifications (Skills summary)
  Education
  Experience (use of skills with accomplishments)
  Work History
  Other Sections (with specific names– not “Other”)

  Separate pages for list of references and
publications and patents

Depending on experience level the Education
and Experience sections change– recent grads
post Education first, experenced seekers use
Expereince first.

Major accomplishments can be inserted after
skills for experienced workers.

There are several variations that can be
helpful, as one can see.  These are only a couple.

Once we agree on the sections to propose,
let’s just propose scenarios where the
functional (non-chronological) can be
useful.

1.  You want to market skills and experience
gained through coursework, experience or
volunteer experience, but do not have
formal certification or degrees.  Or, say
you are seeking a co-op or you are
taking a leave from classes.

2.  You want to focus on skills and
accomplishments rather than a lengthy
employment history.  It may have been
time in the military, serving our country.

3.  You want to emphasize skills not used
in your most recent position.  Perhaps
you are changing careers, or re-entering
the job market.  Perhaps, you have had
a variety of unrelated job experiences.
Or your career growth has not been
continuous.

4.  You work as a free-lance, part-time
or temporary nature.

These all seem to be situations that
functional resumes might be a good way
of descibing your technical strengths to
potential employers.

Do you have others that people should
know about?  Let us know.

Dan

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