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From the Northeastern Section of the ACS, focusing on career management and development
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09/14/20
TIP Senior Checking Accounts at Credit Unions
Filed under: Recent Posts, Networking, Mentoring, Observ. Trends
Posted by: site admin @ 5:35 am

We were at the last checking book for our credit union
account.  On the top of the book is a reminder sheet to
order the next checks at an email address.  So I went
through the filling the form exercise and it would charge
me more than $30 for plain checks.

.
That seemed much to high.  So I phoned the credit union
office.
.
Sandy, the representative , asked for our ages and determined
that seniors do not have to pay for new checks when ordered
through them.  I googled senior checking accounts and 
determined that this is a common practice.

.
As you approach your senior years and your parents do,
contact your credit union and ask for senior checking account
checks.

One Response to “TIP Senior Checking Accounts at Credit Unions”

  1. site admin Says:
    Fidelity Investment offered an article on credit card security and action items in loss or stolen.

    1. Phishing emails may look official, but these fraudulent messages are crafted with a nefarious purpose. Most phishing emails try to get you to click a button or link that takes you to a familiar-looking fraudulent site to enter your account information. Another common phishing tactic is to provide an urgent (and entirely bogus) reason that you need to call a company, like your credit card company or Social Security office, list a fraudulent phone number and when you call, request your personal information, and even your card details, to “confirm your identity.”
     2. Spyware Downloading, or even opening, the wrong file from an email or website can add spyware to your computer, which is put there with the goal of exporting your card details and other information hackers can use to steal your money or your identity. Be careful what you download and prevent spyware by purchasing your own antivirus software.
     3. Public Wi-Fi networks, like the ones you find in hotels and airports, can easily put you at risk if you enter your account information or open sensitive documents and someone is monitoring the network. Make sure to install a VPN on your computer if you need to use the internet away from home fairly often. 
     4. Your trash can be a treasure trove when it comes to finding credit card and account numbers or for figuring out which companies you use for your savings or investment accounts. 
     5. Major data breach  that puts your credit card information and other personal details at risk. 

     What to do if your credit card number is stolen 

     the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) outlines the steps you should take right away:
     Report the loss of your credit card or card number to your issuer immediately, which you can usually do using its toll-free number or 24-hour emergency phone number.
     Follow up with a letter or email that includes your account number, the date and time the card was noticed missing and when you reported the loss.
     Check your credit card statement carefully for purchases you didn’t make, and let your card issuer know of any fraudulent transactions immediately. Carefully monitor your credit reports to make sure nobody has more of your information and that the theft of your card hasn’t led to other instances of identity theft.

    You can check your credit reports for free once a year from all three credit bureaus—Experian (EXPGY), Equifax (EFX) and TransUnion (TRU)—using the website AnnualCreditReport.com.

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