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05/01/17
Business and Economics. Follow up to Sparteine articles
Filed under: Recent Posts, Mature professionals, Legal matters, Observ. Trends, Alternate Career Paths
Posted by: site admin @ 7:50 am

The C&EN article on (+) and (-) sparteine,  which had an
origin in “In the Pipeline,” talks about shortages of specific
chemicals.  Interestingly, this unresolved shortage is a
business of chemistry concern and something, as the C&EN
article portrays, that can be of interest to many scientists for
different reasons.  

.
It is an inventory and supply chain concern and thus there is 
an overlap with Economics that is the focus here.  Economics
characterizes how a business is run, whereas proverbial
‘business’ characterizes how to run a business.  In a discussion
in Yahoo, Economics uses algorithms to maximize profits,
determining the quantity of a commodity that should be made
and its cost to consumers.

.
While the end users focus on delivery and quality, there is
more to the economics side in terms of storage lifetime,
competing product lines for the same equipment, regulatory
and legal (patent) requirements and LCA. [lifecycle analysis]

 

One Response to “Business and Economics. Follow up to Sparteine articles”

  1. site admin Says:
    Example of LCA from a TCI broadcast:

    7 Principles of Greener Chemistry there are many steps that,
    cumulatively, will amount to greener chemistry. The following
    7 steps, based on the widely reproduced work of Paul Anastas
    and John Warner*, serve as guidelines for cleaner, greener,
    safer chemistry.
     1. Go on safety patrol. minimize safety hazards, you also
    reduce environmental hazards.  
     2. Favor catalysts over stoichiometric reagents. Try avoiding
    toxic heavy metal catalysts, but instead use modern and
    relatively benign alternatives, such as organocatalysts,
    hypervalent iodine, nickel, or zinc, whenever possible.
     3. Law of Conservation of Atom Economy: you can reduce
    waste and ensure the final product has a high proportion of
    atoms that were present in the starting material.
     4. Use less energy. Try for reaction conditions as close as
    possible to ambient temperature and pressure.
     5. Does the raw material grow on trees? renewable.
     6. Reduce waste. reduces hazardous waste.
     7. Ideally, products should decompose into innoccuous
    byproducts.

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