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02/19/17
Resume. Qualifications Statements.
Filed under: Recent Posts, Public Relations docs, Observ. Trends, Alternate Career Paths
Posted by: site admin @ 3:47 pm

A question came in:
“Hi Dan,

Can you tell me again the differences (e.g. particular years’
experience) between adept, skilled, proven track record in and
proficient? Thanks.
Regards,”
RESPONSE:
These “lead in” phrases are common introductions into
skill qualifications and Highlights section of a resume. 
 - adept;   a person who is skilled or proficient at something.
they are adept at kung fu and karate”
adept, expert, good, practiced, proficient, skillful, skilful(adj)

 - Proficient  having or showing knowledge and skill and aptitude

 - Proven track record is last and only relates to things like sales,
managing projects where you have metrics to describe the results- 
budget, time, results, people.
 - Experienced in can be used for software or running equipment.
When you do more- design, develop, implement, and solve
problems with, Experienced is not strong enough.

 It is a sign of low skill to repeat the same one more than once. 
That is why we have several to choose

Hope this helps.
Regards,
Dan

Additionally under unique situations certain individuals can be
“experts in…”.  Daniel Levitin has written about who can be
described “expert” in “A Field Guide to Lies...”:

The term expert is normally reserved for people who have
undertaken special training, devoted a large amount of time to
developing their expertise (e.g. MD, pilots, musicians, athletes.)
and those whose abilities or knowledge are considered high
relative to others’.
As such, expertise is a social judgment and relative.  …

Expertise also falls along a continuum.

Individuals with similar training and levels or expertise will not
necessarily agree with one another, and even if they do, these
experts are not always
right.

Experts are often licensed, or hold licensed degrees, or are
recognized by other authorities.

In science, technology and medicine experts’ work appears
in peer-reviewed journals or on patents, recognized with
awards, running or starting a company or amassing wealth.


Expertise tends to be domain-specific and typically
narrow.

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