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12/13/16
Preparing for Decision-Making. Ethics
Filed under: Recent Posts, Interviewing, Position Searching, Job Offer (Situations), First Year on Job, Legal matters, Observ. Trends
Posted by: site admin @ 10:31 am

Reading a blog entry by B. Perlmutter, reminded me of
a section in the second class of our Professional Development
class.  What I like about it is that he  creates a nice context
and story about factors we need to consider in making
decisions. 

Our class offers fewer steps and a template to consider
classroom exercises that students might face now and
will possibly face in the future.
Template steps:
1  determine the facts
2  identify the stakeholders
3  identify the ethical choices
4  make a decision
5  double check the decision

Perlmutter frames his process and story in terms of situations
and risks to reputations in a golf tournament.  Early in his
ethical process, he points out recognizing ethical problems,
even before knowing the stakeholders, interests and
alternatives. 

At first, this order of process steps is not one better than
another but a different perspective about something
scientists and engineers are not often trained to think. 
Ethics can be ambiguous and relative.  In Perlmutter’s
perspective, ethics needs to be considered earlier.  I
think this can be good and a point of emphasis.

Not long ago, this blog offered a legal perspective of
ethical decision-making
.  It appears different than the
first two in that it asks questions about legality,
reputation and consistency with values.

We need to understand that different people will
make a case for processing their thinking.  Forni
I think states it best and has me thinking Perlmutter
says it best for me.  Forni  outlines the urgency to
develop and place good thinking habits as
a priority.  Good thinking makes having thought,
having thought leads to a wider range of viable
choices;  Good choices offer the chance for good
decisions that lead to a good life that lead to
happiness. [paraphrased].

Perlmutter’s process is documented in the
comment.

2 Responses to “Preparing for Decision-Making. Ethics”

  1. site admin Says:
    Perlmutter:
    1. understand ethical implications before you face them.
      What are your values?
    2. when situations arise, notice them and all the
      implications different decisions can result
    3. examine the direct, indirect and consequential
      strangers who are impacted and who observe and
      judge the actions
    4. analyze the interests and outcomes for each of
      the three classes
    5. consider all the alternatives, even doing nothing
    6. execute and implement, if it is risky determine
      how it can be retracted to offer relief
    7. write it down. Document everything as our
      memory and recall is troublingly inaccurate.
  2. site admin Says:


    Perlmutter:
     1. understand ethical implications before you face them.
     What are your values?
     2. when situations arise, notice them and all the
     implications different decisions can result
     3. examine the direct, indirect and consequential strangers
     who are impacted and who observe and judge the actions
     4. analyze the interests and outcomes for each of the three classes
     5. consider all the alternatives, even doing nothing
     6. execute and implement, if it is risky determine how it
     can be retracted to offer relief
     7. write it down. Document everything as our memory and
     recall is troublingly inaccurate.

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