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09/29/16
Trust 2. Elements of Communication
Filed under: Mentoring, First Year on Job, Leadership, Observ. Trends
Posted by: site admin @ 12:37 pm

This topic may apply to working in teams, dealing with
customers and managing challenging situations.  Three
useful concepts come out of Leonard Greenberger’s
soft cover book, “What to Say when things get tough“.

.
A.  He characterizes the need to prepare and craft communications
tactically as beginning in the 1980s when a new field
emerged that outlined three steps observed in communications–
- ignore a situation or problem         NO COMMUNICATION
- explain with facts as you see it       ONE-WAY COMMUNICATION
- engage people involved                   TWO-WAY COMMUNICATION
This approach recognized the emotional component.
.
B.  The strategies he reported can use four equations:
P = R         PERCEPTION EQUALS REALITY
E > F          EMOTIONS TRUMP FACTS
S = B+        SUCCESS COMES FROM BEING POSITIVE
3P = HC     THIRD PARTIES TRANSLATE INTO 
HIGHER CREDIBILITY

What counts is your audience’s perception of what is happening
and whether or not you are trustworthy and credible source of
information
See events through the eyes of others.

Facts do not equate to winning people over.  When people are angry,
worried and suspicious, they absorb and sift through information
with the emotional areas of their brains.

Life is divided between things that make you feel and things that
make you think.  This is hard for scientists and engineers to
fathom.  Situations seek reassurance and empathy.  Understand
how others feel, rather than offering facts.

To achieve success, remain positive.  Words used can often
embody the feeling.  But receivers may pay more attention to
nonverbal cues.

Use third party resources to provide supporting feeling and input.
It helps that they have higher credibility.  The closer to your target
audience is to your source the better.

C.  CODE FOR DEVELOPING TRUST AND CREDIBILITY
                                                                    Weighting factors
Caring and empathy                                            50
Openness and honesty                                         10-15
Dedication and commitment                               10-15
Expertise and competence                                   10-15

Angry, worried and suspicious people pay attention not only to
what you say but also to what you do with your eyes, hands,
posture, clothing and other nonverbal cues.

Caring and empathy accounts for about half of the trust and
credibility judgments that people will make of you.    
 Telling relateable stories can be key.

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