The NESACS Blog
From the Northeastern Section of the ACS, focusing on career management and development
Categories:

Archives:
Meta:
February 2019
S M T W T F S
« Jan    
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
2425262728  
06/03/07
Networking 4. LinkedIn
Filed under: Interviewing, Networking
Posted by: BlogMaster @ 12:08 pm

Just provided a response to a close
colleague about what a person might
do.

Situation:  survivor in a series of 
   downsizings

While the response is a personal history
through similar experiences, a most
valuable one was “re-discovered” in
a blog entry and terrific feedback from
Brazen Careerist
in an interview with LinkedIn’s founder.

Read the whole thing and then, if you have
not signed up already, sign up.

Dan

One Response to “Networking 4. LinkedIn”

  1. BlogMaster Says:
    QUOTES FROM BRAZEN CAREERIST October 31, 2006 “…

    [discussion] with LinkedIn co-founder Konstantin
    Guericke by Penelope Trunk

    Q: How many connections do I need to make
    LinkedIn really work for me?
    A: Thirty connections is usually enough. But the
    quality of connections is important…

    Q: What makes a connection high quality?
    A: β€” [How well the person knows your work so
    they can make a strong introduction for you.] Ask
    yourself what value they can add in an introduction.

    Your network can include people you work for,
    people who are working for you, and with you…
    Quality is also someone with a lot of connections,
    but you have to look to see if it’s a superconnected
    person or someone who is ardent about building
    up their connections on LinkedIn.”

    Q: What are some ways to use LinkedIn to get
    a job?
    A: Sometimes the hiring manager you are looking for
    is three degrees away from you, but the company is
    two degrees.

    Also, use LinkedIn to prepare for an interview. Often
    people have their interests listed. Then you can talk
    about interests or people you might have in common.

    Q: Any other tips for using LinkedIn?
    A: Once you have the offer, ask people who used to
    work at the company but no longer work there –
    they are free to talk. Also, do due diligence on your
    future boss by finding someone who use to work for
    the boss; you can type in the company and title and
    you might find someone who had the job in the past.

    Q: How do I get over the fear of my invitation being
    rebuffed?

    A: Over half the time people say yes…”

Leave a Reply