The NESACS Blog
From the Northeastern Section of the ACS, focusing on career management and development
Categories:

Archives:
Meta:
November 2017
S M T W T F S
« Oct    
 1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
2627282930  
02/13/16
Watch-Outs. 93. ChemBark Employment, “Green science Site”, Open source publishing
Filed under: Position Searching, Mature professionals, Observ. Trends, Undergraduate majors
Posted by: site admin @ 9:15 am

It is true, this blog is a supporter of open source publications.
With the internet, with the incredible expense of hard copy
publication (Chemistry texts at >$150), with restrictions
in information….  While exploring the topic in ACS, ChemBark
blog appeared.

The impetus for sustainable chemistry, processes and
products continues.  This blog seeks to continue to support
its innovation, know-how and application.  My green lab
is shared in this entry.

Back to open source publishing, a dimension in textbook
publishing has emerged and has hopes will take off
as it addresses the cost and obsolescence issues.

CHEMBARK EMPLOYMENT
Source:  ChemBark (Academic) Employment
This blog category lists some unique and valuable information
for people in the academic career path.  It is very readable
and contains tidbits from a career insider that are
thoughtful (UCLA, Haran) and helpful (StLUniversity,
for example).

SUSTAINABLE CHEMISTRY LABORATORIES
Source:  MYGREENLAB.ORG
This web site offers all aspects of sustainable design,
development and training, especially on institutions.
While a company, Lumencor, sponsors this as it is
in the business of environmentally friendly light sources,
it shows a new trend in outreach marketing.

I point to the Chemical Substitutions page as relevant
for this audience and two significant pages for Sustainable
Chemical Assessment
and MIT Green Chemical
Replacement
.

OPEN SOURCE TEXTS
Source:  M. Melia, SFGATE, 2-11-16, “Open-
source textbooks gain in push for college affordability

Article describes the texts as an aggregation of public
domain and Creative Commons sources.  The approach
takes advantage of funding sources requiring grant
recipients making their work available to wider
audiences.   There are certain pros and cons for
faculty, but the advantages for the students might
pave the way to broad adoption at least as an alternative.

Leave a Reply