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10/09/15
Self Assessment Dilemma. Thinking overtaken by Technopoly
Filed under: Mentoring, Mature professionals, Observ. Trends
Posted by: site admin @ 2:43 pm

In preparing for a future class on assessing our personal
emotions that effect our behaviors and decisions
three
books came to my attention, that I wish to tell you about.

- Peter Whybrow,  The Well-tuned Brain:  Neuroscience
and the Life Well-Lived, Norton and Company, NY, 2015

- Neil Postman, Amusing ourselves to Death:  Public
Discourse in the Age of Show Business, Elisabeth Afton
Books, Viking, NY, 1985

- Neil Postman, The End of Education:  Redfining the
Value of School, Vintage Books, Div. of RandHouse, NY
1995

I was curious to learn Whybrow’s take on how our brain
works as we go through our daily activities and thinking. 
We describe most routines as habits that seem to be a
repetition from before and we go into auto-pilot to
perform.  Intuition is based on implicit learning a pattern
of facts, cues and events that we synthesize while going
about our daily activities.  We unconsciously use both.
The class intends to help discover them using MBTI,
values and behaviors assessments.

WHAT MOTIVATES YOU
Research reveals that although human brains attain 90%
of their size by age 6, it will take 2 or more decades to achieve
functional maturity with different regions varying in pace
and timing.
To achieve self-command we must learn what drives us
and accept that we are often ruled by the short term and
habit, although intellectually driven, curious and self
interested.

LOSING THOUGHTS REVEALING CONNECTIONS
Humans sense the need for order in the changing world,
an understanding of our place and purpose which imagination
and traditions/culture offer “touchstones” and signify our
values.  Postman, Whybrow asserts, reflected on a technopoly
which represents an invasion into our imagination organized
realm due to our now gadget-driven, time-limited, distracted
world.  Education is no longer providing the basics to allow
thoughtful questioning, open and adaptable curiosity to
pursue learning.

We have allowed our memory, values, curiosity and imagination
to be outsourced drawn by hyperlinks, video clips, side-bars
distracted thinking and superficial learning.

Schools reinforce the culture of learning for economic utility.
consumership and technology.  This reality, Postman asserts
is a Faustian bargain… we gain a little and we lose a lot.
  - the advantages are unevenly distributed
  - while seeming simple, there is complexity embedded in
each technology
  - new technologies replace older ones in a competition
which speeds up and loses some of its benefits because
of intellectual and emotional biases and financial incentives
  - it is believed that there is a common core with a global
view, but there is too much and much has to be displaced.
–arbitrary inclusion and exclusion results.



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