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10/31/14
Resumes. First step suggestions
Filed under: Public Relations docs, Post-docs, Observ. Trends
Posted by: site admin @ 2:55 pm

So often career consultants get requests to review resumes
by nearly-ready-for-thesis-and-defense PhD or MS student or
a post doc.  When career consultants ask, for good reason,
what position are they applying for, they say

“As far as industries go, I am actually pretty interested in
defense, aerospace, and the like [or medicinal chemistry
or pharmaceutical chemistry and toxicology or chemical
biology or engineering modeling of complex processes] . 
I also wouldn’t mind teaching at a
small college somewhere
with tenure.”

The resume they send me will not land them an interview.
The reason is: the document is an incomplete mixture of a
CV and a resume that does not answer the questions each
kind attempts to offer to the reviewer.

The resume writer, not knowing what career path to aim for first,
might best begin by completing a “master resumeor complete
CV with all personal date.  Jessica Holbrook Hernandez nicely
described the Master Resume as a resource document containing
every skill, valid dates, all positions and accomplishments,
no matter whether in school, as a volunteer or for employment.

All of the information does not necessarily end up in a
targeted resume
which would be sent to land an interview for an
industrial position nor in a CV for academic positions.

In all cases, though, we need to include Keywords used in
the field or industry.  If a person applies to different organizations
for example, one might use NMR for another you might use MRI.

I am always surprised that people use some standard Office
format, when they should realize not everyone uploads
preserving the formatting.  (Read the instructions link for
uploading) Or, that your name should be on
each page with its page number, except page 1.

Another surprise is presuming that the resume reviewer
will be able to figure out the formatting or will understand the
unique meanings of things
like:  ‘pristene graphene,’ phi
lambda upsilon, and ccd (not charge coupled device).

In 2014 the resume document alone is insufficient.  So
much transpires on the Internet, you need to also have
a strong, attractive and complete profile on the web.  One
of the most common is a Linkedin Profile.  A solid
commentary on areas to emphasize is given by Interns over
40 blog
.  It is not a bad idea to list this information in the
resume heading.


2 Responses to “Resumes. First step suggestions”

  1. site admin Says:


    There is so much good content in “5 Minutes to optimize your
    Linkedin profile
    ” it is worth highlighting some of it.

     LinkedIn continues to gain momentum as a resource for recruiters

     Like a resume, a LinkedIn profile serves as a summary of your
    work history.  A LinkedIn profile needs to offer enough facts to
    drive further action by recruiters.
     LinkedIn profiles are not a black box. LinkedIn appears to scan:
    Professional Headline,
    Titles,
    Specialties and
    Industries. 
    Optimize these four LinkedIn categories with the keywords that
    you believe a recruiter would most likely use when looking to fill
    the employment position you are targeting.

    Optimizing your LinkedIn profile is only one important component
    of a “pull marketing” job search strategy.
  2. site admin Says:


    Being specific about the terms is a critical sign of
    professional writing. So, as in our NMR instance
    the specific term, as indicated in examples in the
    wikipedia link can be meaningful.
    See,

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