The NESACS Blog
From the Northeastern Section of the ACS, focusing on career management and development
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05/26/19
Gig Economy. Scientific Writing Editing Review
Filed under: Recent Posts, Position Searching, Mature professionals, Legal matters, Observ. Trends, Alternate Career Paths
Posted by: site admin @ 6:12 am

Say, you have strong technical writing skills in English.
Say, you have time (more than 4 hours a day) and credentials
that clearly show proven skills in improving technical
communications.

.
Well, there is a need, that some societies promote, is available
It is an interesting avocation for some, but I am not advocating
it.  As I contacted an excellent technical writer to seek her 
“take” on this proposal.  As an article by Joanne Chen observes,
while many people look at on-site reviews for determining
a purchase decision, objective assessment from a trusted 
colleague will do better for you.
.
I shared Enago’s offering with Lisa Balbes and bring up several
of her noteworthy comments.  The remuneration is sub-standard, 
sometimes it is not equitable and not timely, the feedback on
performance can seem arbitrary, without recourse..  Other,
online reviews also point out caution.
.
She wisely points out that payment in advance and individual
contracts with stated expectations can avoid many troubles.
comments (0)
05/20/19
Job Loss, Job Search and Retirement
Filed under: Recent Posts, Mentoring, Mature professionals, Technicians, Observ. Trends
Posted by: site admin @ 10:58 am

Now looking in the rear view mirror on this, it is possible
to offer a perspective.

.
One of the key things is to join and participate in professional
societies.  This was a strong recommendation of a former
boss at Exxon Research, Jim Amick.  Our conversations led me
to pursue roles that might provide experience in leadership and
networking.  It was not broadly spoken about at my first two
positions and it was not easy to get approval to attend meetings.
.
Yet when my turn for facing the music of job loss came,
it was my good fortune that managers encouraged me to 
attend a national ACS meeting to participate in the job clearinghouse.
That led to several interviews and offers.
.
Weathering the storms of corporate life is mostly being in the
right place at the right time, by good relationship and
skill building.  Accepting roles that are not part of my formal
background did stretch employment longevity.  But looking for
volunteer opportunities 
for the common good– chairing meeting
sessions, reviewing articles, 
volunteering as local section member
at national meetings and then
learning from successes of others
Then, help others pursue their career aspirations.
.
As I saw happen to even the most talented colleagues, cut backs occur.
Through no fault of their own I saw many people get “sacked” and 
pick themselves up and resume their career somewhere else.  My
content here is to bring up end of career observations, as are described
in Mark Miller’s article and podcast.  [LISTEN TO THE PODCAST!]
.
 - Center for Retirement Research (BC) found 37% retire earlier
(55% fail to reach age 66 target)
 -  one quarter of loss of jobs due to health (UMichigan,
Sanzenbacher)
 -  Workers 55 and older:  unemployment rate 2.6%, but long term
unemployment of >27 weeks, is 26.6%,  [that is, if you get laid off,
recovering is less likely]
 -  Sporadic income is hard to manage, but expecting to reach your
retirement goals set early in life, is getting harder and harder.
.
Pointers from Mark Miller
1. Assess your health and employment statistics in viable fields, as
time goes on.  
2. Create interim plans including health care insurance and alternate
income streams that match outflows.
3. Fees and costs of retirement accounts.  Look for financial advisers
who pursue your goals [interview several and don’t just depend on
robo-investing]
comments (0)
05/08/19
Tax Law Change. Relocation and “Gross Up”
Filed under: Recent Posts, Position Searching, Job Offer (Situations), First Year on Job, Legal matters, Observ. Trends
Posted by: site admin @ 8:32 am

Al Sklover shared one of the impacts of the 2018 tax law
change that allowed the mega wealthy a tax cut is to tax
as income any relocation reimbursement by employers.

.
The article recommends that new or relocated employees
ask for “grossing up” that is having extra sum of compensation
to pay for the taxes due.
2 comments