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From the Northeastern Section of the ACS, focusing on career management and development
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03/31/18
Emotional Intelligence.
Filed under: Recent Posts, Interviewing, Networking, Mature professionals
Posted by: site admin @ 11:01 am

One of my critical findings about IDPs Academic inspired
Individual Development Plans is it completely “whiffs” on
emotional intelligence.

.
I fear that if you ‘fill out the forms’ for IDP you miss nearly 
half of the skills many employers desire in applicants.
Justin Bariso wrote a thoughtful article on how emotional
intelligence is revealed.  It is not about using big words and
offering elaborate details about technical concerns.
.
He offers
1.  asking questions of yourself, like
     how does my mood affect my behaviors, thinking and 
decisions?
      what subsurface influences affect me and others?
to uncover self and social awareness.
.
2.  how do you control your reaction to things that affect
your emotions.  You have little to manage your emotional
take on things, but how you react can reveal your character.
.
3.   Do you say what you mean and mean what you say?
.
4.   Empathy for others;  not meaning agreeing with others
but trying to understand others.
.
5.  Do you intentionally commend and show appreciation
for others?
.
6.  Do you keep your commitments and help others?
conversely, do you apologize for short-fulfilling commitments
and even guard yourself from being taken advantage of
by being manipulated?
 


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03/27/18
Legal Issues. Promises and Reading Contracts
Filed under: Recent Posts, Job Offer (Situations), First Year on Job, Mature professionals, Legal matters, Observ. Trends
Posted by: site admin @ 8:33 am

Please note:  Sklover’s Working Wisdom remains a leading
resource for us that I highly recommend.  Recent notes of
importance are highlighted in this entry.

.
PROMISES:  KEY QUESTIONS TO ASK
In a clearly written post, A. Sklover indicates two specific 
questions you should ask when offered a bonus, promotion
or something of value–(1) ‘when’ and (2) ‘what conditions
need to be met’.
.
Specific date or time frame is the only acceptable response.
.
Conditions that must be met should be under your control
and influence.
.
If this promise is part of a job offer, it needs to be inserted into
the offer letter.  If the promise occurs at another time, like
a transfer or termination, for example, clear email statement
with a return email confirmation of the negotiation request
is important to document.
.
LEGAL TERMS IN CONTRACTS
One item I have a basic understanding for, but have the
experience that when I asked too many questions, it raised
a red flag with the organization.  Do not waver, reach an 
understanding.
Incorporated by Reference“–  [flashing red light:  stop and 
check]
This formally includes more than one agreement between 
parties which may limit or remove protections for you.  It
is a flag to review each agreement and note the wording,
asking for clarity for your circumstance.
.
A second contract term is a new phrase.
Ambiguity Clause“– [yellow light :  caution]
Review every provision and understand this phrase mitigates 
any reward or limits outcomes for you.  Al Sklover points
out this can increase risks to you.

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03/20/18
Spam message. What do you do?
Filed under: Recent Posts, Mentoring, Mature professionals
Posted by: site admin @ 2:53 pm

Spam?  What do you do to protect yourself and the sender?

I recently received an unexpected email message from a
colleague that I did not expect.  We know each other.   Yet
the message seemed unusual…”I need your help.”
.
The message was sent from her gmail account, which is not
unusual.  Yet I know of her from her university.edu account.
.
So, I replied to her at her university.edu account professionally,
indicating that the email was not what I expected.  If however
she did seek my help, what is needed.  She responded in
short order indicating that the message indeed was spam.
She had been ‘phished’ and was working to repair the problem.
.
The trick is not to not reply to the trick email for you do not
know if there is anything that can get your account into
trouble by opening her bogus email.
.
Two resources to share on this topic, and I am certain all
of us will face a situation similar to this…
Indiana University 
PC World Spam Prevention
comments (0)
03/11/18
Absenteeism and Illness. Should you take off when ill?
Filed under: Recent Posts, Networking, Mentoring, Observ. Trends
Posted by: site admin @ 1:46 pm

Two organizations that employed me had rules for
absenteeism.  One was quite strict in that you could
choose certain number of days off with pay.  Requests
should be made in advance.

.
Importantly, attendance records were criteria for
advancement and ‘perfect attendance’ was clearly
and widely recognized and rewarded.
Thus, even when you are ill, with a flu or fever,
people were expected to come in, and ,if you could,
visit the company nurse who could dispense some
over the counter remedies.
.
Another employer left it to supervisors to decide whether
it was in appropriate to report not coming in to work and
exposing everyone to the spreading of illness.  Interestingly,
it was recorded but did not seem to make a difference in
assignments or promotions.  [We were to call the supervisor
and report illness.  As many sick days as needed were 
granted.  I do not know of any specific limit.]
.
Allison Doyle has written a nice piece about absenteeism
in the workplace, noting its costs to employers to be on the
order of half  a billion dollars.  Since absenteeism can cost
in productivity and revenue, time off for illness has varied
treatment and risks.  Many places seem to go the route of
PTO paid time off for vacation, special event or illness.
Others provide an annual number of sick days one is 
entitled to take.
.
Various medical organizations have investigated personal
illness and its impacts on the organization  and the individual.
While it may not be part of policy, one might argue a case
can be made to follow CDC guidelines for actions to take.
  -  encourage people to take preventative measures
  -  limit contact with others to avoid spreading;  even
stay home 24 hours when symptoms are real and invasive.
  -  supervisors should be proactive at every level in protecting
individuals and noticing symptoms
.
Recently, this writer was beset with a sinus like infection.
I limited contact as much a possible for as long as spreading
symptoms existed.  It meant sending condolences to events
I was expected to attend.  It is important to be the first
example of proactive behaviors and enforce similar 
recommendations on others.  It should start in the class
room and grad school research labs.
.
Then, practical policies of dealing with this perennial
issue of staying home when you are sick can be the general
policy, with appropriate checks and balances when 
appropriate.
 

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03/02/18
Emily Post: Digital Profile and Networking
Filed under: Recent Posts, Interviewing, Position Searching, Networking, First Year on Job, Legal matters, Observ. Trends
Posted by: site admin @ 7:35 am

While Pier Forni leads the way, I believe, in helping us
see civil behavior in organizations and different
situations, the updated Emily Post book adds some
useful suggestions for what your digital profile includes
and pointing out problem areas.

.
Post indicates what each professional should consider
as components of their digital profile.  Update each 
regularly and keep them consistent..

*      complete and update Linkedin profile, with
appropriate recommendations
*      have a well maintained blog and website
*      have links to published content in your name
*      list membership on boards, charitable/ educational
groups and organizations
*      include awards and achievements
*      cite positive press 
.
Just having a solid digital profile is not enough.  Be 
aware of potential trouble areas, like:
*      privacy protections on Facebook
*      uncensored, overly personal
or controversial history
*      less than flattering photos tagged to your name
*      old media that does not reflect who you are now
*      unflattering press
Search your name and some name alternatives

Social Networking Tips
1.  Online privacy is an illusion.  Just about everything has
a digital fingerprint.
2.  Think twice about offering negative criticism online. 
Can be easily misinterpreted, especially in the absence
of facial expression, tone of voice
or nonverbal cues…
3.  Opinions will be formed on everything you post and
much can be taken out of context.
4.  You bear responsibility for online image

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