The NESACS Blog
From the Northeastern Section of the ACS, focusing on career management and development
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01/17/18
Leadership 2. Strategic Thinking
Filed under: Recent Posts, Mentoring, Post-docs, Observ. Trends, Alternate Career Paths
Posted by: site admin @ 1:38 pm

When you are in various career paths your
activities tend to place you in a silo of activities
to meet agreed upon goals.  You develop and
use tactical skills to improve things, to identify
things and to make or combine things.  You may
also use SPC or DOE to identify problems or
influences.

.
Leaders will do this.  However, they also develop
strategic thinking.  Jo Miller’s article,
3 Ways to be a strategist Rather than a Tactician
addresses some of the unique features of the
strategist and the tactician, including:
.
1.  Shift from day-to-day thinking to years ahead
     then work backwards from goals, like in a 
     synthesis challenge.
.
2.  Work with groups outside your limited chain 
     of commandLearn their SWOT (strengths,
     weaknesses, opportunities and threats) for longer
     term to see where there is commonality to 
     engage and collaborate.  Ask if you can help
     them?
.
3.  Look for areas to change for the better–
     transformational change.  Where tacticians
     chip away at goals and do not threaten
     the status quo, strategists involve change and 
     build new skills.
.
Thus, change your time horizon, broaden your
scope of influence, and seek out transformative
changes.  It is an article worth reading.
comments (0)
01/12/18
Timing
Filed under: Recent Posts, Job Offer (Situations), Mentoring, Leadership, Alternate Career Paths
Posted by: site admin @ 7:27 am
When you are surprised by someone or an event, you
may not be ready to do the right thing.  Right?  We
always recommend the importance of preparation.
.
The same is true of of daily agendas and decision making
and acceptance of new ideas.  D. Pink highlighted this
in his book, When…
New ideas:  Better to speak to higher ups in the morning,
earlier in the week, or after a break…
Brainstorming:  Off-peak time, like later in afternoon,
when you are more open-minded.
.
It is true however that we have different peak times.
Think about when yours might be.  The idea then is
to develop strategies to adjust to different circumstances.
Pink talks about some of these.

Good news, bad news:  most people accept bad news first.
.
Start-ups  :  Ask a series of questions, like:
What is the present and short term future market conditions?
… demand, available customers, price and competition
Assess your stress tolerance and forward seeking
optimism… What is your back-up plan?
Do you have the technical resources to move into place,
or know how to reach out to them?
comments (0)
01/01/18
Mid-career Job Searching.
Filed under: Recent Posts, Position Searching, Networking, Technicians, Alternate Career Paths
Posted by: site admin @ 5:16 pm
It is an ever present challenge about finding another position,
either from job loss, limited growth possibilities, or loss
of excitement for the employment situation we find ourselves
in.
.
We question our choices up till that point.  But alas we have 
learned that more often the choices we made were valid but
for changes in funding or preferences or timelines.
.
Mid-career offers different challenges than early career.  You
have an established work history, salary history and contributions
to your department involving trusting connections, lucid
communications and committed networks.
.
Not every personality faces this kind of job search comfortably.
It is certainly important to have established mentors to bounce
ideas off of.  They can be a sanity check…
.
You can always get better… if there is something lacking or needing
improvement.
.
It is not too late to learn new things…  Especially if you know what
your career gap is.  It might be harder if you do not know the gap.
That is when you fall back on your strengths and building out from
them.
.
You should not hold back from going in another direction,
especially if it is an area of high interest.
Do the right thing, even when no one is looking.
Pay forward, pass on valuable information.  You never know what 
could make a difference for others.
Know your risk tolerance level, and those in your family that depend 
on you.
If you need help, ask for help;  join a professional organization;  use
your experience to volunteer to help others.
3 comments