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From the Northeastern Section of the ACS, focusing on career management and development
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12/17/13
Wise Skill. Intentional Attention
Filed under: Observ. Trends
Posted by: site admin @ 12:05 pm

Do you look into TED Talks every once in a while like
I do?  I find many engaging and helpful.  One by Peter
Doolittle
caught my attention recently that seemed
related to a recent book, article and podcast of  Daniel
Goleman
.   It wasn’t until I listened to Randi
Zuckerberg’s
podcast that they all made sense to me.
…retroactive sensemaking… an Aha moment.

Intentional Attention is an important skill to master.

Randi (of Facebook fame) made the case best for me. 
There are two ends of the spectrum.  Those whose lifestyles
are strongly disrupted and interrupted by modern social media.
The second end are people who are resistant to change
and will not adapt. 

Both ends lose out.  This is where Doolittle and Goleman
come in.

Goleman makes a strong case for needing to manage
the modern 24-7 hyper media and diagnoses where over
use leads to loss of “cognitive control” and an “empathy
gap”.  He also poses that too much addiction leads individuals
to laser focus into the present and narrow, losing sight of
others and of the wider world. 

Doolittle and Goleman both offer intentional attention
management skills
building up the “attention focus muscle”
identifying tools, systems and practices that can be used
and offering that we need to proactively employ the modern
social media with:
  -Mindful moments  [meditate to sharpen our focus]
  -Wise waiting [restrict and plan your digital and fun times]
  -Unit tasking [small wins each day with and away from media]
  -Digital awareness [personal mindfulness of best practices
  where media enriches, solves problems, enhances creativity]
  -Mindful transitions [permit ‘open awareness’ to unconsciously
  solve problems]
  -Scheduled digital “detox”  [creative cocoon]  and
  -Focusing signals to task at hand.

Learn that our short term memory has a limited capacity.
Assess information systematically by asking questions and
seeing where it fits
.  Determine if it is knowledge that it is
elaborative or illustrative
.  Have a “capture mechanism” allowing
you to come back and reconsider.  Fit it into a structure
where you can share with others with meaning and example.

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