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From the Northeastern Section of the ACS, focusing on career management and development
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12/06/13
Job offer situations. Reasons why you might not accept an offer
Filed under: Position Searching, Job Offer (Situations)
Posted by: site admin @ 4:11 pm

There are many people with strong technical skills
and backgrounds competing for positions today.  After
you work hard to research and find a position, apply
by writing all your public relations documents,
interview in several scenarios, and then wait for
an offer.

When the offer comes, must you accept it? 

If you have competing offers, how do you choose
the best one to select?  The one with higher salary?
What other possible factors could be considered to reject
a single offer or deselect a second place offer.  This
post discusses some factors to consider.

WORK ASSIGNMENT
DANGEROUS TO YOUR HEALTH
- exposure to toxic chemicals, heat, cold, asbestos,
heavy metals, radiation, etc
- lack of personal protective equipment or procedures
to monitor health and exposures.

PHYSICALLY RISKY ENVIRONMENTS
- facilities with out of date inspections or equipment
to safeguard employees
- operations that expose you to back or foot ailments,
for example.

TOO HARD TO HANDLE ALL ASPECTS OF A ROLE OR
NO JOB DESCRIPTION OF EXPECTATIONS
- small firms, for example, with limited resources but
with ambitious plans
- what is the last person in the position now doing
- what are the job review parameters and expectations

FORMAL ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES
- is it a poor match to your skills, experience and interests
[so that you are always a step behind, trying to catch up,
with limited or no help or mentor]
- will it allow you latitude to get inside and outside
exposure, networking opportunities, training and personal
growth
- will you be asked to take a lower level assignment that
might affect your reputation
- what is the formal title; “junior” scientist or engineer
is it suitable to your experience and background?

SUPERVISOR
-  is there a good record of management, management
training displaying organization and motivational skills
-  is there a level of ease to know goals and speak frankly
about the organization and its prospects
-  good, clear answers to your questions in reasonable
time;  you feel a priority
-  would your next position possibly be her position

CULTURAL FIT
CORPORATE  CULTURE
-  do the written, spoken and acted upon values match
your personal values
-  is the pace of business and teamwork style suitable
-  ask how things get done:  could be hierarchical, could be
informal with limited or no written rules; 
-  ask to see an employee handbook;  are you comfortable

CORPORATE MANAGEMENT AND HOMOGENEITY
-  is it heavy handed where everyone speaks the same
words?
-  is there good communication with access to new or
different ideas and approaches
-  are different populations represented in management
and in departments
-  is there an authentic code of behavior and is it followed
-  did you see and feel it on your interview

CHANCE FOR GROWTH
-  how long has your supervisor been in her position
-  what was the supervisor’s career path
-  where have previous job holders gone next
-  will the position allow you to build and grow skills
and gain valuable experience

INDUSTRY EXPERIENCE
-  some leaders believe industry knowledge trumps
functional expertise, thus you start at a lower level
-  is it a “detour” or “fill-in” position

NEGATIVE PEOPLE
-  in informal conversations and discussions with your
network do you find “negative impressions” from current
and former employees
-  any signs of lack of respect

TERMS OF THE OFFER
SALARY AND NEGOTIABLE BENEFITS
-  do they meet your family’s near term and future needs
-  are you factoring in cost of living and commute distance
and time
-  confirm all the details of relocation assistance, starting
insurance dates, etc.
-  will you need short term housing and transportation

TRAVEL AND HOURS OF WORK
-  establish through questions how much personal time is
taken up by work related roles and responsibilities
-  is the cost of living and residence expectations reasonable
for you to have more than one hour commute in rush hour

NON-COMPETE AND OTHER AGREEMENTS
-   are you too restricted on your options if you leave

These are some of the items to gain information on and speak
with career consultants or mentors about.

Wikihow provides some thoughts on how you might reject an offer.

 

1 comment
Mock Interviews. Preparation and Practice before formal interviews
Filed under: Interviewing, Position Searching, Observ. Trends
Posted by: site admin @ 1:34 pm

Interviewing is a performance.  It takes preparation,
self-assessment, research, planning, practice, feedback,
and review
.  Consider the performing arts or competitive
sports as an analogy.

It is also marketing of yourself.

It is helped by actively doing it and facing the nervousness
of being on the spot and not knowing exactly what will happen
and in what order.  Yet you want to make a positive experience
while making a strong case for your candidacy.

As such, it helps to actively learn interviewing skills by
observing others.  In so doing, you can place yourself in another’s
place and assess what you would do.  You could note positive
behaviors and places where things could be done better.  In this
process you can improve your interviewing skills and behaviors.

PRACTICING AND LEARNING SKILLS IN MOCK INTERVIEWS
This week we performed a Mock Interviewing workshop in
which many attendees agreed they gained great benefit from the
big picture continuum and the very professional feedback each
mock interviewee was offered by Marisha Godek, the experienced
interview reviewer.

We chose to perform six different interview scenarios taken
from the Interviewing continuum.  Every single one had
excellent “teachable moments” that was followed by discussion
  clarifying what happened,
  shining light on nonverbal signals,
  pinpointing things to avoid,
  offering situations where improvisation was required,
  positive small talk leading to either agenda
setting or elevator speeches, and
  offering how to face challenges in problem solving and case study
interviews.

As a NACE survey reveals your technical skills, accomplishments,
abilities and acumen help you get the interview and provide ~30-40%
of the input for a hiring decision.  The remaining factors influencing the
decision include social acumen, self understanding, behavior and
interpersonal skills, working with data, computers, teams and
setting goals.

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