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11/18/13
Wise Skills. Keystone Habits, NOW Habit
Filed under: Interviewing, Networking, Mentoring, Observ. Trends
Posted by: site admin @ 8:42 am

Should I be surprised?  At a recent workshop we
addressed “wise skills” which are deliberate, proactive
skills that we practice as a result of co-curricular
learning
, not the “hard skills” from our formal education
and not “soft skills” that all employers expect each one
of us to demonstrate and use.  Wise skills set us apart
from all other the highly qualified candidates.

Surprise #1:  Many could identify with procrastination
as a common weakness, once they thought about their
behaviors and responses to situations.  They liked
learning about the “NOW Habit” which is a stepwise
understanding of usual causes of procrastination and a
thoughtful routine to “push through” the barriers to
reach our objectives.
CAUSES
Procrastination is that habit we use to “ease our fears,
anxieties and self-doubts.[the cue]” 
It can result in “busywork”.  But, another outcome of the
cue is to treat everything that comes up, as important. 
This results in many interruptions, which adds to more
time to restart our work and delaying doing the important
things.
NEW APPROACH
Plan to do play things.  So that you can return to the urge
to do work toward goals
.
Set goals and workable objectives.  Think backwards from
when you want to achieve your goals.
Know your “flow states” and how to enter them.
Plan that you will have adversity.  Learn from each setback.

Surprise #2:  It is possible to identify habits that do not
lead to positive outcomes.  But what was surprising
members did not realize you can intentionally change
habits to achieve desired outcomes, by knowing: 
CUE-ROUTINE-REWARD (The ‘Habit outline’ of Duhigg.)
This is something they could do for themselves, but it
takes specific action and thought to develop
Keystone Habits. (Duhigg, Chapter 5 in book)

Surprise #3:  Some members mentioned that the pace
of the workshop changed from one section to another part
of the workshop.  Where there was interaction among
participants it seemed slower but was absorbing.  When it
was more lecture, it moved faster and then engaged the audience
via  questioning and response.  There could have been another
exercise, one commented.  I thanked them for the comments,
the whole strategy was to reveal the importance of
face-to-face communication
[liking the exercises and sharing with others],
time management

[creating incidents and situations where surprises or unexpected
outcomes were teachable moments, yet we finished ahead of time]
and keystone habits.

Surprise #4:  Subliminally at the beginning, we did a series of
activities that were analyzing who was attending the session.  Yet,
each person felt the exercise revealed things to each participant. 
This was a pursuit of reciprocal audience analysis, where the
presenter learned about the audience and the audience learned
about themselves.  [Audience analysis is another wise skill.]

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