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05/05/13
Watch-outs 43. Decision-Making, Using Social Media and Emotional Intelligence in Business
Filed under: Position Searching, Job Offer (Situations), Mentoring, Alternate Career Paths
Posted by: site admin @ 11:33 am

Before we get to three items, Al Sklover shared
some amazing, in-the-moment employee benefits
that firms offer, in place of real pensions…

In the same vein, we link to highlights of an
article on Daniel McFadden about consumer choice,
things that affect our decision making process.
A second link relates to ideas on how scientists
and engineers participate in social media.  While
we are for the most part scientists and engineers,
it is interesting to learn what drives and divides
business school talent assessment–
emotional quotient.

CHOICE DECISION MAKING INFLUENCES
SOURCE:  The Economist, “Free exchange“,
4-27-13, p.72
Mcfadden overlaid neuroscience and psychology on
economics in relaying a conclusion that our preferences
are “fluid.”  He cited:
-  mundane things are valued more highly when we
think of them as “our own.”  Think: stocks we hold whose
price has dropped, insurance policy deductibles [premiums
for lower deductibles], even our clothes that we own.
-  memory and experience of an event are dominated
by how we feel at its peak and near the perceived end.
-  order in the presentation of alternate choices and what
happens right before the choice exhibit strong influences. 
Think:  social networks, online habits
-  more choices is not always good.

SCIENTISTS INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL MEDIA
SOURCE: PLOS Biology
A file-laden, open access article on how scientists
are evolving in their use of online resources. 
A nice status report in a related, interdisciplinary and
international field in which many of us participate.
Thanks to Linkedin .

BUSINESS SCHOOL SELECTION
SOURCE:  M. Korn, WSJ 5-2-13 p. B1
It is interesting to track how business schools are
adapting to hiring practices in their industries.  They
seem to be adapting assessments of personal
and emotional competencies based on scoring
competency models.

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Chemical Enterprise Growth Predictions.
Filed under: Position Searching, Mature professionals, Observ. Trends
Posted by: site admin @ 10:47 am

The art of predicting the future convincingly is being
challenged by a realm of five trends Douglas Rushkoff
crystallizes from the intersection of
handheld devices
                          (portable information in the moment vs.
                           story line and trends),
shortened icon-loaded messaging
                           (texting, IM  vs. narrative with detail,
                            subtelty, and nuance),
how we view time
                            (I am always “too busy”; helter-skelter
                            what is next? vs. linear clock based ),
dealing with our identity and completing tasks
                             (focused attention vs. multi-tasking).
These trends in his book “Present Shock” are in contrast to
what this blog entry notes.

Building on an earlier entry on Peter Diamondis’s
technology trends and an era of abundance, Robert
Stevenson has put forward the notion that the business
horizon for the chemical enterprise is bright
and
clear-skied.  Sure, there are problems but the story he
tells of a bright future based on raw material supplies
and the technical innovation that brought it about should
give hope internationally.

The reason Rushkoff and Stevenson seem to be opposed
is that Stevenson’s long term view deals with a narrative
with many chapters with focus on few, highly important
tasks where Rushkoff’s view of media and the attention it
divides us into is on the present, multi-tasking where
everything is important and a dilution of effort, especially
on hard, long term goals.

So, despite where the collapse of narrative and living
in the moment is taking us, I believe there is a positive
future that depends on recognizing common goals,
prioritizing efforts to solve problems which are sure
to come up.
Stevenson issues:
- environmental impact of combustion and resource
recovery (water, especially)
- managing electricity generation with evolving use
patterns
- developing technology to recover, transport, and
handle wastes (improve fracking, scrubber and
use sustainable concepts)
 

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