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From the Northeastern Section of the ACS, focusing on career management and development
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06/29/12
Careers after post-doctoral appoinment. LANL
Filed under: Position Searching, Mature professionals, Post-docs, Observ. Trends
Posted by: site admin @ 11:14 am

Had the pleasure of organizing and co-facilitating a
workshop recently.  One of the events of the workshop
that differentiates this program from many I have seen
is a wonderful panel discussion of truly accomplished
professionals who work in different roles in government
laboratories.

Some highlights and take-aways:
  -don’t be afraid to quit a position and seek change
  -work at the intersection of areas of expertise
  -learn from failures;  observe teams disintegrate and
amazingly people are resilient and good ideas transcend
  -we need to find ways to impact policy makers to
assist in making wise decisions
  -membership in professional societies is not only
informative, but also essential in successful careers
  -be flexible;  adapt
  -identify and work on the problems of our times, like
drug resistant TB, using the latest technologies
  -work/life balance is an elusive goal;  no one has your
equation for balance, nor should they make the decision
for you
  -teaching:  consider being a scholar, an educator or a
mentor
  -take time to talk to policy makers
  -work in “knowledge valleys”

There can be a problem of managing time in panels.
I feel every panelist build on each other’s ideas and
perspectives, were lively and passionate and made
the audience not only want to listen, but want to meet
each person to get to know them.
Panelists:

Eva Birnbaum LANL
Tom Tierney LANL
Basil Swanson LANL
Dave Pesiri LANL
Peter Avitabile UM-Lowell


comments (0)
Findings about LinkedIn. Recent input
Filed under: Position Searching, Mentoring, Observ. Trends
Posted by: site admin @ 10:06 am

Yesterday I learned some more tools and insights
into how we might use LinkedIn in our job searches.
I also have some questions from proteges on how
to keep job searches confidential from current employers
and also from possible employers.

NEW TOOLS
Search optimization.  For a fee, job seekers can
“bump” their profiles to the top of the LinkedIn
search list
.  A Ph.D. seemed to improve her Internet
presence by purchasing a LinkedIn service.

Another incidence that seems intelligent involves
listing more detail in your LinkedIn profile about
work you have done in the past.  A senior level Mechanical
Engineering professional did it in a previous post;
yesterday I learned about a person listing undergraduate
research in lubricant chemistry leading to interview
invitations.  When information contains keywords and
is smartly organized to be easy to read, it can yield
positive leads to positions.

COMPLETE YOUR PROFILE;  UPDATE YOUR
SELF ASSESSMENT
I met one gentleman who had a little used LinkedIn
account and now wanted to explore changing positions.
Isn’t it true– we should have our network ready for us
when we need it.  Not have to try to develop it
just when we need it, as it is usually too late.

His family recently had a child, his wife interviewed in
a different city and he wondered what he should do as
it did not seem best to have his family separated.  Really
build up your profile on line, include it in his resume
heading.  As things in life happen, his wife’s job despite
a verbal offer did not come through.  But now is the time
to update the profile with the new information in his
family’s life.

His self assessment will have changed since before his
new arrival.  This will influence how he might approach
a job search.

1 comment