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From the Northeastern Section of the ACS, focusing on career management and development
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08/10/10
Brave, new world. Things not to do
Filed under: Interviewing, Position Searching, Public Relations docs
Posted by: site admin @ 8:57 am

We have so many incredible tools at our disposal with
modern technologies. 
  We can instantaneously send an application to our
target via FAX, or email. 
  We can copy and paste segments of text into another
document.
  We can provide salary information that includes signing
bonus, bonus and stock options with our actual salary.

I have seen each of these done.  Some would argue,
no big deal, everyone does it to some degree.
Wrong.

These actions seem to be something people ask for
forgiveness after being caught, rather than doing the
right thing, the first time out.

FAXING.  Resume submission rule addition
Fast is not best with resume submissions.  Now, more
than ever, fax transmission is received at a common,
public machine.  Your submission should be to the
identified person of your cover letter in a form that
retains your format.  So many companies now enlist
word scanning software to recognize key terms in
their resume screening.

Some people, recruiter or desired recipient, may
ask for a fax.  Then, consider a fax and also take
the extra effort and send a
hard copy with a cover
letter.


PLAGIARISM WITHOUT ATTRIBUTION.
Every scientist should get into the habit of
providing acknowledgment and attribution for
the ideas and written work of others

Please recognize this is a “hot button” issue with
many.  It is not something that should be taken
lightly.  Even placing a footnote can meet your
responsibilities, in some cases.

There are certain venues where acknowledgment
is essential– public talks, funding applications,
your interview seminar, etc.

A detailed discussion appears in the NYTimes.

WHAT IS YOUR SALARY.
More often than I care to count, members have
told me the salary they told a prospective employer
was “inflated.”  It does no one any good to
misinform.  It can lead to dismissal.  So do
the right thing and, if you want to inflate, define
all the elements
-  “salary was …, bonus was
…, signing bonus, awards and reimbursements
amounted to ….”

Interestingly, these days salaries either are not
increasing, year over year, or are regressing
in certain fields where there is an over abundance
and not a lot of competition.

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