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From the Northeastern Section of the ACS, focusing on career management and development
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08/03/10
Body Language Attention
Filed under: Interviewing
Posted by: site admin @ 8:31 pm

You won’t go wrong being sensitive to both
the interviewer’s and candidate’s body languages.

Look carefully to understand what signals may
possibly be being unconsciously sent in these
nervous situations.

1.  some innocent gestures may be suggestive of
different signals– “I’m married”  “I’m available”
“I’m attracted”– raising hand to eye level to display
wedding bands, hair tousling, licking lips and eye
and eye-brow gestures

2.  maintain an appropriate distance between
interviewer and candidate.  If there is no table,
consider adjusting your seat to a slight angle,
making it still easy to have good eye contact.
Keep your feet on the ground and arms
relaxed on your lap, or involved in the conversation
and occasionally touching an interview table,
when present, are appropriate.  Crossing legs,
other than at
the ankles or folding arms,
is inappropriate.


3.  There are behaviors, even while waiting
for interviews to start that should be minimized.
Hands on hips, clasping hands behind one’s
head and the athletic stretching movements
should be done in private, if at all.

4.  Your voice needs to be strong and
consistently confident whether in person
or on a telephone interview.  Keep your
thoat moist.
with mints or menthol drops that
lubricate and medicate. 
Remember to start
speaking a little louder at the
beginning of
a statement and settle to you
r normal voice
projection.  On the phone, know a
proper,
comfortable position for both
speaking and
hearing.  Don’t hesitate to
ask if voice and
transmission are clear at the beginning
of
a phone conversation.


Smiling while speaking offers warmth and
genuineness. 

Susan Ireland speaks to several body
gestures in her blog.

comments (0)
Aiming toward Boston. Behavioral questions
Filed under: Interviewing
Posted by: site admin @ 8:05 pm

Recently I came upon ten behavioral questions
I am glad I did not encounter!  It is very good
practice to develop and practice responding to
these tough ones.  There are few tougher!

comments (0)
Internet Presence. LinkedIn Profile
Filed under: Position Searching, Public Relations docs, Networking, Leadership, Mature professionals, Post-docs, Technicians
Posted by: site admin @ 7:55 pm

There is evidence that it is important to
establish
and maintain a technical internet
presence
, like in your LinkedIn.com profile. 
It is separate from
your professional
affiliation and can list several
important
items that you want people to know
who
might want to contact you for various reasons.


Career consultants suggest also providing a
folder
in a “cloud location” (like google docs)
that contains
publications, presentations,
patents and posters.
  The usual authors, titles
and citations and a
link to .pdf or .doc file
should be provided. 


Specific elements of one’s profile might be:

1 NAME THAT YOU ARE KNOWN BY AND
  APPEARS WITHOUT CONFUSION ON
  YOUR RESUME OR CV

2 ONE LINE TITLE OF EXPERTISE

3 SUMMARY
  bulleted list of skills and accomplishments
     designs, syntheses, characterizations
     teams led
     goals achieved
     strategic impact of projects ($$, time,
proprietary position without violating any
agreements)

4 QUALIFICATIONS
  bulleted list of specific items with
differentiating
detail, showing depth of
understanding and
familiarity

5 EXPERIENCE
   Post-doctoral, graduate and
undergraduate
research, development and
team activities

   Management and supervisory training
   Business school or Education experience
and
training

If areas formally different, it might still be
significant
for networking purposes.

6 EDUCATION
   Formal education– degrees, departments,
institution, location, and information links

7 PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS
   What groups do you belong to?

The Blog “ReCareered” provided another
perspective on what the profile
might contain. 
A few highlights
to take note:

A. list specific areas and subjects in which
you have
achieved;  generalists do not seem
to draw attention
in these profiles

B. think about what it looks like in the finished
document.  Long paragraphs will not be read.

C. Volunteer activities, community involvement,
manuscript reviewing are fair game.

D. Other online activities, web-pages, list-servs
and
key professional networking tools are helpful
to point to your on-line presence.

E. Getting appropriate recommendations has
value.

3 comments