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From the Northeastern Section of the ACS, focusing on career management and development
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05/05/10
Watch-outs 20. Cloud computing and ETFs
Filed under: Networking, Mentoring, Mature professionals
Posted by: BlogMaster @ 6:40 pm


Cloud computing is becoming more mainstream
in fields other than business and entertaining. 
The long tail impact is expanding in many fields
and new tools are available for professionals to
benefit from the Internet.  ETFs’ profits can be
eaten up by larger tax bites.

GOOGLE DOCS USED TO BRING
COURSE MATERIAL TO STUDENTS
Source:  C. Eustace (Look at his blog.).

Chris was right. 
Migrate to the cloud for documents for
the Professional Development course and make sure
the grad students knew of the importance of a
personal web presence and twitter.

My powerpoints and the students’ assignments were
uploaded to a course folder in Google-docs and
available for all.

Reasonable documentation
and examples in a help-site.
Know about file size limits on uploads.



TURNING A WEBPAGE INTO A KEEPER

Source:  K. Boerhet, WSJ 4-21-10;  Turning a
WebPage into a Keeper

As more and more activity gets coordinated via the
web, smart resources that do multiple tasks for us
are developed.  How do you “bookmark pages or
documents” for
later reading?  Author Boerhet talked about
this in her 4-21-10 column about icyte.com

 

HIDDEN TAX TRAPS IN ETFs
Source:  J. Zweig, WSJ 4-17-10 Hidden tax traps
in ETFs

 ETFs are taxed higher, especially those involving
alternative assets like commodities and
currencies.  With taxes likely to change, it is
important to explore and be aware of tax
implications to assess holding or buying more.

 

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Academic Position. Interview for Community College
Filed under: Interviewing, Mentoring
Posted by: BlogMaster @ 5:03 pm


Recently, I had the privilege of working with a
member who asked for help with his interview
for a position at a community college. 

Brief pointers were sent, for example:  onsite
interview preparation
and reminders about civility..

Then he asked for specific, detailed help regarding

his interview in a phone conversation..
His interview lasted one hour and was tightly
scheduled to include:

A) chemistry CLASS (personal choice of topic) (10 minutes)

B) RESEARCH PROPOSAL and goals (5 minutes)
The audience for both was the search committee.

His preparation approach involved:

A) CLASS-  power point presentation for
carboxylic acids and their derivatives

B)  RESEARCH PROPOSAL- power point
presentation divided into:
  1)  Introduction (1 slides)
  2)  Aims (1)
  3)  Plan of action (2)
  4)  Achievements after one year and how it
positively impacts XXCC (2)
(here he emphasized undergraduate research,
collaboration and getting funded)

Suggestions offered were:

A) CLASS-  Consider bringing in some
natural products containing carboxylic acids
and esters that have odors, like fruit as in
the Wikipedia table

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ester


Consider showing what happens to these
materials and then write the reaction on the
board.  Do you use tangible teaching materials
like molecular models?  These might be
helpful.

B)  RESEARCH-  There should be a preliminary
budget estimate.  Look for equipment that is
common in most college laboratories, if you
can, to keep within academic setting limits.

Include acknowledgments for funding
organizations and people with whom you have
worked.

C) QUESTIONS -Consider asking questions about the
length of the
contract?   When does it start?  Is there
a chance
to start working earlier?  Explore the
interviewers’
experiences working at the community 

college.

Ask for a tour of the laboratories and a chance
to meet the students.

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