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From the Northeastern Section of the ACS, focusing on career management and development
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12/30/09
Watch-outs 17. IRAs–slow, charitable and other considerations
Filed under: Networking, Mature professionals, Legal matters
Posted by: site admin @ 6:40 pm

There seems to be many new features,
changes and
things to know about IRAs
every day.  Look
at previous Watch-outs for
news on these
tools that should be managed
for long term
financial stability.  Here are
three that came to my attention:


LOOKING FORWARD TO USING OUR IRAs
Source:  K. Greene, Slow Roth IRA, WSJ
12-26-09, p. B2
Consider– convert your losing investments
(no or reduced taxes), “hold” on converting
big gainers, when you convert convert into
separate accounts to manage future gains
and losses and convert gradually over time
observing your tax bracket and consequences.

NEW 2010 ROTH IRA RULES
Source:  K. Greene, WSJ Conversion
consideratons
, 12-12-09 P. B1
Looking to have lower taxable income
after we reach 70 years may encourage
traditional and rollover IRA holders
to convert.  A big push will come for
when higher income earners can own
and contribute to Roths in 2010.

CHARITABLE IRA ROLLOVERS
Source:  church bulletin
Congress retroactively extended the
IRA provisions from 1-1-08 to
12-31-09;  donation must be made
from traditional, Roth or rollover
IRA to a charity.  No taxes paid, it is
not eligible for deduction.  One day to
use it.


2 comments
12/27/09
Job Search Plan in Challenging Times
Filed under: Interviewing, Position Searching, Recruiters, Post-docs, Technicians
Posted by: site admin @ 3:07 pm

While there are signs of unemployment turn around
for jobs in chemical fields, searches are taking longer.
Experienced technical people have indicated
they have had to interview and accept positions

  1) well outside their field, yet in areas of interest, 
  2) that is technically challenging, but involves
longer hours,
  3) in an area of interest, however not full time,
and 
  4) in an area where they have mastered
the technology with no growth (in salary and
responsibility), yet it keeps
them employed.

Part of the strategy of finding their positions
involved serious organization  1  2  3  .  In addition,
they worked hard in a separate place (home office
set up for searching or in an outside office) in three

phases: 
 
preparation and background research,
  interactions via media (phone, networking events)
and meetings, and
  follow-up (prompt, with added value) for results. 
They did not sit at a computer all day looking at
job boards.


In addition, they were flexible in allotting nearly
equal time to each phase.

Some interesting observations they had:
  - the strategy depends on the targets– field
and location (submit resumes to people in your
network for submission, prepare and hone your
30 second PR advertisement, ask for feedback)
  - LinkedIn.com and recruiters continue to
grow in importance  (improve your online profile
and develop rapport with recruiters)
  - develop relationships at your target companies
(information interviews, learn their products,
business model, and where you might fit in)
  - conduct regular searches on the best
job search engines (continually improve your
search terms, sites of interest and share with others)
  - keep up with your network

2 comments
12/22/09
Resumes. Formatting
Filed under: Public Relations docs, Post-docs, Technicians
Posted by: site admin @ 10:24 am

As we all know, curriculum vitae can be
used to apply
for academic positions. 
They comprise a comprehensive
listing
of all professional endeavors and can be
a
useful first step for creating targeted
resumes
to apply for industrial and other
positions.


[Generally, CVs do not have an objective
but include
a detailed listing of relevant
accomplishments,
intramural and
extramural interests and professional
activities.
  CVs include specifically lists
of references, publications,
patents and
presentations and other documents

associated with the application. (teaching
philosophy,
research proposals, and so forth.)]

Resumes are targeted public relations
documents
showing relevant
accomplishments, experience and

interests matching the needs of firms’ open
positions.


This post examines resume formatting
You may
find many common features from
other career consultants.
  Generally,

1. FONTS AND PAGE SPACE
Font type and size should be easily
readable
.  Consider Arial, Verdana, and
Courier with size of 11 or greater.
  There
should be an inch boarder without lines on

each page.

2.  PAGE ORGANIZATION
Your name needs to appear on each page. 
It is
helpful to include a page number and
systematic
organization of section headings
(normally on left or
center) and dates
(normally left or right hand column).


3.  BULLETS, BOLDING AND CAPS
Freeman has cited eye tracking research
pointing to the use of bullet points, shorter
phrases,
use of bold or caps.  Yet, too
much highlighting
is distracting and use
of italics is of limited value.
  Usually
underlining is not often used, if caps and

bolding is common.

4.  HYPERLINKS TO WEB-PAGES
Digital versions of resumes can make use
of
hyperlinks in the experience section to
web-pages
of employers, in your heading
to your own
personal web-page and blogs
that you author.


5.  HYPERLINKS TO PAPERS
Digital versions of resume files can include
listing of peer reviewed papers, patents
and
presentations.  A hyperlink to a .pdf
file
, if available, is helpful.  These lists
are not common
ingredients of resumes.

6.  UPDATED CONTACT INFORMATION
While lists of references are not formally
part of resumes, they can be included in
your
resume file as a separate page.  It
is important
to ask for and receive
permission to include a person as a
reference
and list updated contact
information
.

7.  LENGTH
Not including references and papers,
patents and presentations, resumes will
not be longer than 2 pages.

comments (0)
12/21/09
Employee Mobility. Foreign-born pros and Temporary Employment
Filed under: Position Searching, Networking, Leadership, Mature professionals, Technicians
Posted by: site admin @ 9:41 am

Most industries and companies do not
readily
share information about
mobility and practices
around salary
administration and promotions.
Second
hand information is inferred on hiring

practices based on the number of job
ads in
magazines, positions listed on
web-sites and
company campus visits. 
(This stresses the
need and importance
of ACS members
participating in
ACS salary and employment
surveys.)

BUSINESS CULTURE - Foreign born.
D. Mattioli authored a piece suggesting
recently
better employment scenarios
outside the US. 
The US job scenario has
been visited with freezes
in promotions
and salary increases (even reductions

and furloughs) and a return home for
employment
appears attractive. 

It is not possible for me to verify
increased
employment opportunities for
foreign-born
colleagues.  It is interesting
to read about trends
of better employment
for those who feel they
have not been
motivated to excel in their careers
by
management who can treat foreign born

employees less than equal.  Some may
disagree
, however, this feeling may
reveal cultural differences between
business in their native culture and
business in the US.
  (See Legal
issues blog in the blogroll-  A. Sklover)

BUSINESS CULTURE - Temporary.
Another provocative trend, seen readily
in
adjunct hiring in academia, is temporary
work
in specialties at middle and senior
levels of
organizations.  It is seen in
many organizations
that undergo
transitions.  The Economist
Schumpeter
(12-12-09 issue) column argues
for this
not being short term but in fact reveal

a trend Peter Drucker proposed. 

With the proposals before Congress,
it is possible
that mobility might be
increased.  Pension portability
(without
penalty), health care coverage for employees

in small companies and entrepreneurs,
and some
improvements in small business
unit capital markets
(making investments
possible.) are all things that are
part of
the decision process for employees.


Employee decision making for transitions, it seems,
will not get easier in the future.  Business culture
seems to be evolving.

 

comments (0)
12/17/09
Email. Bane or bonanza.
Filed under: Public Relations docs, Job Offer (Situations), First Year on Job, Mature professionals, Legal matters
Posted by: site admin @ 10:40 am

We all work with electronic communication
tools and
depend on them extensively in
our business, personal
and professional
lives…  Emails, IMs, text-messages on

blackberries, tweets and more…

To say refrain from using them would be
a dis-service.


Manage their use, understanding their
advantages,
disadvantages and the
inadvertent “tyrannies,” is offered

in this contribution and comments.  1  2  3 

When we write or read an email it is like
we enter
someone’s thinking process from
our own thinking
process mid-stream.  It is
easy to mis-associate,
become interrupted,
and get/ give the wrong impressions.

Josh Freeman put much of this in perspective
in his
recent book.  I liked especially his
interpretive
perspective of what happens
inside our thinking:


1. processing in shorter attention spans;
responding
and expecting faster feedback 
(See Torkel Klingberg
).

2. dis-inhibition - the habit of entering things
we might
not say in person, or as soon or in
a hard-edged manner.


3. impulse gratification - need to catch
the latest
input to excite “motor neurons.”

4. inpacts of burrowing into our own created
“virtual
spaces”  (George Trow)
.

5 comments
12/11/09
Watch-outs 16. Working Women, Roth IRA, Entrepreneurs, Time-Management
Filed under: Position Searching, Networking, Mentoring
Posted by: site admin @ 7:15 pm

The topics of the success of working
women
and time management
have not come up before.  A
proper
input vehicle permits thoughtful comment.
With book review articles providing pros and
cons and a variety of perspectives, those
ideas are explored.  In addition, the ‘long
tail’
reaches out to Roth IRAs and
entrepreneurs in
this entry.

WORKING WOMEN
Source:  L. Landro, On Women and
Working
, 12-5-09
Three places for insight for women in
professional positions are books
reviewed in this article.  The review
points out places for women to go
for information on specific advice on
leadership, networking-relationships,
family-authenticity, and advancement.

NEW 2010 ROTH IRA RULES
Source:  J. Pessin, WSJ New Roth Angle,
12-5-09 P. C15
New rules go into effect in 2010 for
people of all income levels to move
into Roth IRAs.  People understand
the no MRD (distribution limitations
in retirement) and the tax rate level
benefits.  If this bears your attention,
visit a number of sites to explore how
it may work for you.  Understand,
financial advisers will likely benefit
from this.

TIME-MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS
S.Shellenbarger, WSJ 11-18-09, p. D1
Testing Time-Management Systems
Based on personal coaches the author
tested three systems for improving the
quality and quantity of your work.  All
three have helpful devices that are
worth learning about and applying. 
One approach pushes stopping busywork
when other things should be done. 
The second system applies discipline
including planned rest times.  The third
organizes action items with commonality.

ENTREPRENEURS SUCCESS DEPENDS ON
Q. Huy, WSJ, 11-30-09, p. R8
Trust Me, and other sites.
Details matter in convincing supporters
and customers to want to work with
someone new or new to an area.  Four
ideas were vital– define key elements
to qualify you, professionalism, ability
to deliver and building new ties.

 

comments (0)
12/06/09
Critical Skills. Teamwork.
Filed under: Interviewing, Mentoring, Leadership, Mature professionals, Post-docs, Technicians
Posted by: site admin @ 11:47 am

In most industrial, commercial and
entrepreneurial
fields and ventures,
effective teamwork tells the

difference in success and bright idea
that never
materialized.

Robert Ballard
talks about this in
describing his
many discoveries as being
the result of a terrific
team working
together with common mission,
priorities
and a willingness for individuals to

“leave their ego at the door”.

Thus, interviewers will seek evidence
of an
interviewee’s teamworking
experience and
skills.  They will ask
about this in several ways.
  You need to
plan your responses to include
clear
stories, in some cases, and inferred
references,
in other cases, of how you
behave, organize and
become part of
teams to achieve goals. 


Several thoughtful links are:  1  
2  (many behavioral based questions) 
3  (some tougher business based
considerations).

1 comment
12/02/09
Social networking. Worldwide
Filed under: Position Searching, Networking
Posted by: site admin @ 11:18 am

Most everyone reading this blog has
heard of LinkedIn.com
and some of
its uses.  In fact we point to a link
updating us
on continuous improvements
and benefits.  It should not
be a
surprise that LinkedIn is carried in
other languages.


LinkedIn has competitors in other
countries, as well.  For
example, in
France, you can network on
Viadeo .  In
Germany, Xing is the thing.

Fewer than 500,000 LinkedIn members
pay for services,
or 1% of membership. 
Revenues come mostly from

recruiters and human resources funding. 
Subscribers
provide an order of magnitude
higher percentage
of Xing and Viadeo
revenue.  All of these are growing

concerns serving slightly different
memberships.
1  

This entry is part of the long-tail for
networking.

1 comment