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From the Northeastern Section of the ACS, focusing on career management and development
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11/16/09
Interview Protocol. Meeting someone you do not know
Filed under: Interviewing, Networking
Posted by: site admin @ 2:41 pm

A funny thing happened at NERM.  We
had a workshop beginning at 1 pm on
Friday and I had planned and arranged to
mock interview a person who agreed
to do so.  We had only conversed on
the phone.

Time was getting close so I walked out
of the meeting room into the mezzanine
area.  As I walked I surveyed her trying
to figure out something, “Hello, Laura,
[name changed] glad you made it. 
I’m Dan.”

“Hi, Dan,  How did you know it was me?”

Well, a very common thing interviewers
do now is search the people who they will
meet.  The search profiled her and provided
her  photo from intercollegiate athletics.

It came in handy.  It also gave me some
interesting information that we used in the
mock interview.  She was quite surprised
by how the mock interview process
worked.

Let me add, this came about from a
problem ‘Laura’ had.  She is an undergrad
at an institution driving distance from the
meeting and learned too late about
registering for the workshop.  She wisely
contacted the meeting organizer and
asked for help.  The organizer and I
agreed she could be my “guest” at the
meeting and would be most helpful if
she could be our first interviewee.

So, her “problem,” wisely managed,
became a “triple win”– (1)she attended
the workshop, (2)we had our first
audience participant interviewee, and
(3)she had a mock interview.

Then, to top things off in marvelous
fashion, the sent personal “thank you”
notes to the organizers and ACS.

Thank you, Laura!
[I think she has what it takes and will
do quite well!]

comments (0)
Academic Position. Teaching Philosophy 2.
Filed under: Position Searching, Public Relations docs, Post-docs
Posted by: site admin @ 1:17 pm

What are some necessary criteria for
a person
to review and comment on
a Teaching
Philosophy statement a
member has created?

(1) Has he taught relevant post-
high school
courses with scientific
content? 
(2) Has he
written his own
teaching philosophy and
reviewed
and commented on other peoples’

statements?
(3) Is he willing to read and assume the
author has integrity?

With this out of the way, when I review
teaching philosophies, it takes me about
10 ‘read-throughs’ to adopt the mind of
the author. 
COMMUNICATION SKILLS  It is critical
that teachers be gifted communicators
who
can appeal to their audience in
the first
paragraph, or even the title. 
Think of Tom
Friedman the NYTimes
columnist, for example.


Communications must lead through
story-telling
and factual example to a
logical and ‘telling’
conclusion in excellent
composition and form.  [These are
academics, after all.]

The author must also bear in mind
who the
intended audience is.  The
audience
analysis of the written word
probably needs
to examine the institution’s
mission statement
, core values and
student body.  So, a statement
to a
research oriented large class size
university
might not fit with a liberal
arts institution
or a military academy,
as extreme examples.


SUGGESTIONS
Visit the university, speak with people
who have written successful statements,
and submit your drafts to people who
have
the critical background mentioned
above.


Sure, it may be possible to create your
own
document by reading through
power points
of ‘how to’s’  but I have
seen only one of those
– not mine!

CONTENT:  Refer to
1
                         

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