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From the Northeastern Section of the ACS, focusing on career management and development
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11/07/09
Confidence. Surprises when you go one step further
Filed under: Interviewing, Mentoring, Leadership, Mature professionals, Post-docs, Technicians
Posted by: site admin @ 8:29 pm

Rosebeth Ross Kanter points out there
are three
essentials to confidence– 
accountability,
collaboration and
initiative to seize the
opportunity..

Let me tell you more about these
learned from
R. Kanter’s book.  She
describes these in terms
of
corporations, yet they apply to
individuals
and entrepreneurs.
Accountability describes the
combination of
sharing data, information
and know-how,
assuming responsibility,
and setting and holding
high standards.
Collaboration with partners to achieve
shared
goals
Initiative to take action and do what
is necessary
to make a difference.

This book came to my attention as I
read her
book “Supercorp” in which she
describes the
emergence of a 21st century
class of companies,
she calls vanguard
companies
.  These firms develop
humanistic values and motivate

employees to solve problems and help
societal
needs as leading components
of their business
plans.

Let’s return to Confidence.  Kanter
frames
the term as the situational
expectation of a
positive outcome
Because of this expectation,

 - effort is applied,
 - resources are directed and
 - people stick to specific courses of
action in
situations.

What sets this work from others is she
  - specifies what things to notice to
turn things
around (positive attitude
and behaviors),

  - what things to do when things
are going
well (prepare for worst case
scenarios),

  - encourage leadership in every place
(opening up innovation, new ideas, and
’stretch’ goals)

Confidence can be taught and has
to be
earned and is something leaders
need to be
constantly assessing in
candidates and
employees.



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Negotiating and Deciding
Filed under: Interviewing, Job Offer (Situations), Legal matters
Posted by: site admin @ 9:36 am

Negotiating is an integral part of a
good decision-
making process.  The
question is usually, at least
for recent
graduates, what and how should I pose

a negotiation process?

A member recently contacted me with
a delightful
problem.  He had two
hard-copy offers in hand,
with $13000
difference in salary, difference in

company size, differences in vacation,
holidays,
savings and investment plan
and effort in bringing
him on board. 

We talked about the excitement he
has with each
position and he felt he
would do well in both
places.  He
would learn quite new skills (proposal

writing and negotiations) in one, he felt. 
His spouse
will relocate and need to
find an exciting position
for herself
in both situations.



The ACS salary comparator was of
some
value in this case.  One (higher)
position’s offer was
$8K below the 50
percentile value ($91K;  note
location
in high cost of living area);  the second


was $2K higher than benchmark ($68K). 

[SUGGESTION:  this is should always
be done
for every position for which
you interview,
before the interview.]

The rest of this entry offers
  what other consultants considered
significant 

  what items had some “wiggle room”
in the
discussions with both companies,
and

  some words and phrases that were
thoughtfully
used..

He was provided input from my cabinet of
counselors:
 - some felt there was little to negotiate
at
this time;  evaluate the offers as is. 
[My
recommendation:  ask each ‘Is this
your
best offer?’ and determine which
items to negotiate based on which had
‘value for him and his family.’]
  - most felt his decision would be
based
on where he would get the most
satisfaction
and provide greater personal
growth.

  - some felt questions could be posed–
dual ladder for advancement (get a
company handbook for details),
what are the details on bonus plans,
what happens after the first project is
completed,
what is the annual review process,
which is a better place to live and
with whom (people) was he most
impressed
?

Negotiable items included:  increased
signing
bonus, increased relocation
reimbursement
max allowance, earlier
starting date (influences vacation,
quarter when certain
benefits start,
bonus plan, etc.), and
flexibility during
transition period (temporary housing,

travel allowances, automobile moves, etc.).

Key words and phrases: 
  - High level of respect for the
opportunity
to work there,
  - describe the offer as fair, but is
it
possible to re-evaluate based on
a competing offer
from a Fortune 500
company

  - when accepting and rejecting offers,
accept the offer you want first, then
reject
the second best offer.  (don’t go
backwards)
  Confirm the details that
have been negotiated.

  - when rejecting the offer, indicate
that it
was a fair offer and the decision
was not
based on how he was treated
during the
interview process.  He was
delighted to
have met everyone on
the interview team
and wishes to
thank them.

  - With bonuses, can the bonus be
summed up” (taxes paid on the bonus)

.

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