The NESACS Blog
From the Northeastern Section of the ACS, focusing on career management and development
Categories:

Archives:
Meta:
September 2009
S M T W T F S
« Aug   Oct »
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
27282930  
09/09/09
Careers in Chemistry. Future Trends 18. Quorum Sensing in Bacteria
Filed under: Position Searching, Post-docs
Posted by: site admin @ 5:39 pm

I just couldn’t resist cutting out the
WSJ article
by Guatam Naik about
chemically controlled social

communication in bacteria.  I came
away just needing
to find the original
publications and presentations of
Prof.
Bonnie Bassler of Princeton.


See
  -
a video (from the WSJ)
  - a presentation on the topic (by B. Bassler)

As the article points out Bassler and co-workers
document a chemical interference
specific mechanism where a designed
chemical interferes with the
bacteria
quorum sensing mechanism.  This reduces
the impact of bacterial infections and
could provide cures to some diseases.
This
complex system behavior opens up new
mechanisms for chemicals to interact with
organisms and environmental systems.

comments (0)
About Remembering Names
Filed under: Interviewing, Position Searching, Networking, First Year on Job, Recruiters, Mature professionals, Post-docs, Technicians, Legal matters
Posted by: site admin @ 12:00 pm

Does it happen many times to you,
as it has
for me?  Forget someone’s name. 

There are procedural aids that commonly
help
us, like
  - introducing yourself, ‘hello, my
name is ….’
then giving time for h(er)im
to provide their name.

  - using their name several times in the
next part
of your conversation
  - writing the name down on a handy
sheet

  - associating a unique characteristic
with the
person
  - entering the new name into Outlook,
your phone
or your blackberry

An interesting tip came today about a
person who
did a sales call.  He learned
to
jot down peoples’ names and the
type/color of shirt/top they wore at a
meeting.  Then,
use that knowledge in
addressing
responses to their questions,
requests for
questions or business
information or ending the conversation.


Using a person’s name is one of those
tips in
developing good small talk habits
that benefit professionals everywhere.

comments (0)