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03/13/09
Resume File. Publications listing
Filed under: Position Searching, Public Relations docs, Mentoring, Post-docs, Technicians
Posted by: site admin @ 2:01 pm

A lot of differing opinions came in from colleagues
when the question was posed: 

Should I list papers that have been written but are
sitting unsent on my professor’s desk?
 Let me offer a fuller context:

“A member shared the story of submitting his resume
and then being asked, “didn’t he have any publications
resulting from his dissertation?”  He then responded
that his adviser had three paper manuscripts on his
desk.  The recruiter suggested that they be added to
the resume as ‘in preparation’, otherwise people would
wonder why no publications from the work.  So, I
sent in the modified resume and soon after received
all phone call from staffing expressing interest in
pursuing my filling their openings.” [edited]

This is a tough market, even tougher than recent memory. 
(1) Do, with integrity, what you can to represent
yourself
well as an attractive candidate for
interesting positions. 

(2) Everything you do will be fair game for
questions and
follow-ups.
(3) Various firms expect to see papers generated
from
the research that we do from universities. 
When one
works in industry, publications are possible,
but do
not happen as often.  (see a previous blog
entry for discussion.)
In fact, when reviewing resumes professionals may
rank resumes based on number of years from BS to
PhD (years in grad school), number of papers from
undergraduate research,
number of papers from
graduate research, number
of papers from post-
doctoral research, number of
review articles and
book chapters, quality of graduate
program and
professor, quality of post-doc adviser,
and even
time to publication from starting research.


So understand there is benefit in sending in a separate
sheet ‘list of publications’ with your resume.  (refer to
‘resume file’ in blogroll and above blog.)

This question demands responses from different
perspectives.  So, I asked trusted colleagues the
question and their responses are provided in the
comments:
- tenured faculty member, dozens of graduates
- senior industrial technical director, hundreds of hires
- experienced faculty member, program director
- technical recruiter with strong history of hiring
many doctoral candidates and mentoring many students
- experienced entrepreneur
- me

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