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From the Northeastern Section of the ACS, focusing on career management and development
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08/12/08
Relocation Considerations and Negotiations
Filed under: Job Offer (Situations), Mentoring, First Year on Job, Mature professionals, Technicians, Legal matters
Posted by: site admin @ 10:06 am

SITUATION:  You have been offered a
desirable position, providing your family a
positive future and opportunities, personal
challenges, and pursuit of personal goals. 
However, work is just beginning.

After formally accepting the offer on the
phone or in person, then write a formal
acceptance letter.  Many times relocation
will occur.  While not formally part of the
interview process, it does set the tone for
how people will see and note who you are. 

CONSIDERATIONS:
 - bringing your family (or at least your spouse)
to the locale where you will be calling home
 - asking to meet with the relocation  benefits
coordinator for your division or company
 - assessing what is formally covered among:
closing costs, moving expenses, interim
traveling expenses, interim living expenses,
and many other things that come up.
(Consider even asking if any expenses that
are taxable can be offset by “summing up”
payments at tax time.)
 - reaching out to your network to learn
what their relocation experiences have been,
assess what has been covered for others
who have been relocated by the company
 - factoring in the effects of each day’s
commute, the traveling demands of the
position, access to airports and commuter
arrangements, like rapid transit passes,
parking, carpools, speed-pass, and other
conveniences that will help balance
family, work and commuting demands.
 - reaching out to the new employer for
peer transition programs.  Certain situations
will contract with relocation specialist
firms to provide expertise to meet a
new employee’s needs and desires.
 - maintaining your control over stresses
that can affect you by getting enough
sleep, exercise and relaxation
 - developing a strategy of how you
will meet your family’s living quarter
needs, whether renting, owning a
condo or a house, or leasing
(some companies offer interest free
loans)
 - comparing and finding out about
children’s schooling and family’s
daycare, church/synogogue and
community involvement
 - remaining open to tips from many
sources to overcome problems that
may not be anticipated
 - rebuilding your essential “safety net”
network (doctors, lawyers, senior living
arrangements)
 - paying attention to relocation taxes

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