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05/31/08
Careers in Chemistry. Future trends
Filed under: Interviewing, Position Searching, Networking, Mentoring, Recruiters, Leadership, Mature professionals, Post-docs, Technicians, Observ. Trends
Posted by: site admin @ 11:22 am

Recently, a “heady” book came across my
desk.  Entitled “The Design of Things to
Come” it covered so many elements that
hit upon so many different segments of
this blog’s readership–
  -recent STM grads,
  -mid-career
  -change-overs
  -manager types
  -mature people in STM
  -academics
(STM = science, technology and mathematics)

Vogel, Cagan and Boatright (authors) are
business school professors at Carnegie
Mellon and offer penetrating insights that
I have never seen the likes of before!

In “The design of things to come” they
identified consistent
patterns they
observe that lead to innovation…which
they say will make all the difference in
our futures.

The remainder of this entry offers comments
on:  “powers of ten” analysis, blanketing IP
for brand identity, and leveraging outside
perspectives.

These insights apply to people trying to

 - figure out what they want to do or
shift into          BE PROACTIVE
  - forecast what may happen and
impact on our futures  STAY AHEAD OF
THE CURVE BY TRYING THINGS.

To aid in identifying trends the authors
suggest considering three frameworks

 - social framework:  the market’s
cultural undertone, its impacts on life
style and political dynamics

 - economic framework:  the market’s
focus and limits of buying power

 - technological framework:  significant
advances, new uses and technology
niches.

Clearly theirs is a different, a marketer’s,
perspective.  Chemists may be more
familiar with the technological window
and not look for the social and
economic.  Their value is in viewing
“markets”.  Their added value is to
frame windows to see where the market
is and what pressures the market is
driving to seek and want.  It is that
gap between the current and the
future desires or wants that will
emerge new products.  Some may have
been in the drafting stage for a while.
Think:  hybrid vehicles, windmills,
netflix, and a myriad of shifts.

3 comments