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From the Northeastern Section of the ACS, focusing on career management and development
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05/03/08
Mature workers. Financial alerts and speed-bumps
Filed under: Networking, Mentoring, Mature professionals
Posted by: site admin @ 1:24 pm

Two neat articles in the WSJ point out pitfalls of
working beyond the retirement age and an intriguing
capital gains benefit for early retirees.

T. Gutner authored a nice piece (print Apr. 29,
2008)
about benefit reductions for even part-time
workers with regard to defined benefit (pension),
social security (although there is pending
legislation proposed to reduce the impact)
and medical insurance coverage.

It is worth looking up, if you are in this situation.

K. Hube wrote an article (also not on the net)
about a new 0% capital gains tax rule (print
edition:  May 3-4, 2008).  From
2008 to 2010
long-term capital gains and most
dividends
are tax-free for taxpayers whose
AGI is less
than $65,100.

You need to be in the 15% bracket.

This will take some planning and is geared for
early retirees who have not started withdrawing
on social security or have a significant taxable
ordinary income.  She points out several practical
ways for us to take advantage of this.

Pass this one on!

comments (0)
Resume Heading
Filed under: Public Relations docs, Post-docs
Posted by: site admin @ 3:24 am

Dear Dr. Eustace,

“Thank you very much for your message.
I
appreciate your
kind help with my job

search. Attached is a sample application
package. It might
give you some

information before we talk on the phone. ….

Basically, I got my PhD in Analytical and
Physical Chemistry
with more on Physical

Chemistry side. I studied the interaction
between small
dye molecules and

polypeptides and other biomacromolecules,
and its effects on
the conformation and

aggregation of polypeptides and other
system properties. 

Now as a postdoc, I am working on the
conjugated polymers and conjugated

polyelectrolytes…
Since I have been working with
many

instruments (such as HPLC, GPC,
UV-Vis, Fluorescence, Laser, FT-IR,
etc.)
for system characterization, I

would like to find a job in analytical
chemistry
fields, working with
instrumental

analysis…

I look forward to talking with you soon.

Best
regards,


HJ”
=======================

HJ and I spoke and exchanged some
useful information about how reviewers
might read his resume to match their
openings to fill.

1.  first 7 - 30 seconds:  Key information
up front that matches needs
2.  after first cut, review about 10% of
resumes for supporting information
displayed clearly, briefly and with
specificity
3.  depending on number at the end of
second cut, look for other intriguing
factors that may help candidacy.

It is important to list key information
on top half of page one.

Let us focus on the Heading.
Our conversation determined four
important
items not revealed by his
first draft of his
resume.

1.  He has employment authorization
document and will not need H1b
sponsorshipThis should be placed
in the heading because of “foreign
sounding” name.

2.  He is currently working as a post-doc
at a Florida school.  His resume heading
could list two columns on the tophome
address with one email and phone AND
his department address and university.
It indicates to the reviewer that he is still
employed.
“It is easier to find a position, when you
still have a position.”
3.  The email address from the university
is not always reliable and available.  His
gmail account is one he uses from all
contact sites.
This should be the email he lists on the
resume.  It should use a business-like
name.
4.  It is much more common now to
list cell phone number as the contact
number.  Make sure important phone
calls occur
where there is good reception.

comments (0)