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From the Northeastern Section of the ACS, focusing on career management and development
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09/23/07
Mentoring 3. Alternative ways of finding what you want to do
Filed under: Position Searching, Mature professionals
Posted by: site admin @ 5:26 pm

Kathy Hansen of QuintCareers offers an interesting
novel way of thinking about how to figure out
what

-  recent grads want to do in their careers
-  changes mid-career people might look at
-  realms of investigations mature chemists and
technologies

In an engaging note she reviews how storytelling
might be used to define your life.

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Finding Positions: Academic Realities
Filed under: Position Searching, Mentoring, Mature professionals
Posted by: site admin @ 5:13 pm

ScienceCareers highlighted a article by
Richard Monastersky about the prospects
of recent science grads in technical
disciplines.  A second link is listed.

A brief abstract is 
“… long periods of training, a shortage of
academic jobs, and intense competition for
research grants…”

This academics’ oriented journal points out
wide swings in research funding, slower
responding university staffing, hiring and
adjustment to functional realities (number of
students, specialization, requirements for
completing degrees, post-docs, facilities,
and more.)  makes it challenging to
succeed in academic roles.

The article offers directions for dealing with
these conditions that have been “felt” for some
time with the known outcomes many people
have experienced.

Although the article points out that the
“American Chemical Society made suggestions
in 1947 that largely mirror the most recent studies,
including proposals to improve mentoring, to
avoid narrow specialization, and to prepare
students for careers in industry.”

As we know, all fields and realms of
employment (academe, entrepreneurial,
government, and industry) have stresses
and the trends to have professional
development skills be part of the
training advanced degree professionals
receive is realistic, if not needed.

The funny part of all this is that some
people felt this many years ago and are
waiting for someone else to do it….
It would seem to be a professional
responsibility not only to point this out, 
also provide the supporting information,
and take specific steps to address
this head on.

How should this be done? 
At what level would it be effective? 
What would it look like?

 

 

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