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From the Northeastern Section of the ACS, focusing on career management and development
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02/02/07
Public Relations Documents. Web Profiles
Filed under: Public Relations docs
Posted by: site admin @ 4:05 pm

Our world hasn’t moved completely to posting
resumes online yet.  The time seems to be coming
fast.  In many places, people are posting their
“general resumes’ on boards and winning interviews.

They are doing a number of things “right” in their
resume.  Some “winning” observations I have seen
recently are:
-  format the resume so that it is viewable on screens
without too much shifting
-  clean, readable appearance
-  for experienced people, listing the web-pages
of the firms rather than the address in the
experience section.
-  in the experience section, list accomplishments
with enough factual detail that it means something
and indicate some link to your skill set
-  consider listing a key words section at the end
to cover words that software may look for. 

Another item that is happening online is creating
profiles for ourselves.  The profile is common with
online networking as well as many companies and
departments are asking for people to post their
profile (not mine, yet!).  The ways these kind of
tools are being used is increasing geometrically. 
So it is worth mentioning several things about
profiles– some rules of  thumb–

1. Don’t print anything you would not be very proud
of, that includes 
     badmouthing former employers, co-workers, 
bosses, etc…, 
     embarrassing photos or videos or even links
(check them out)
2. Show youself in professional, high quality
images acting the part.  Looking good.
3. Understand there will be economical, abbreviated,
business-ways of expressing your accomplishments. 
Study them, get feedback on them for readability and
clarity, and modify as time goes on.  Plan to update
reagularly.
4. Make your profile searchable and represent you
and where you wish your career to lead.
5. If there is a format, use the format.  Find ways to
actively use these networking tools.  Share them with
others, even for example people you ask to be your
references.
6. Remember they don’t replace the personal touch
or in-person interaction.  So, consider having this lead
to professional interaction, whether it is paper, or phone,
or in person.

Any thoughts on these documents will be valued.

See reference: http://www.careerjournal.com/myc/climbing/20060829-needleman.html?cjpos=home_whatsnew_major

Dan

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