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From the Northeastern Section of the ACS, focusing on career management and development
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09/20/19
Career Management. 2019
Filed under: Recent Posts, Position Searching, Legal matters, Observ. Trends, Alternate Career Paths
Posted by: site admin @ 7:03 am

For access to all of 2019 entries with links to the pages please review the following
listing.

Hot Buttons.  Trade secrets  9-11
Hot Buttons.  Cell
phone hacking
  8-21
Hot Buttons.  Subscription
Model
  8-11
Hot Buttons.  Where do
you get reliable data, information and conclusions  7-29
Hot Buttons.  Stress
in Grad School, Post-doc, and career positions 
7-22
Hot Buttons.  Women in
Scientific Leadership
Roles  7-11
Hot Buttons.  Online
Presence
  6-23
Hot Buttons. 
Motivation underpinnings, Financialization and Laws  6-3

References following Job Interviews  9-7

Legal Issues. 
Provisional and Utility patent applications and C-I-P
  7-25

Watch-Outs 110.  H3+,
High Pressure Elements, Retractions
  6-14

Gig Economy. 
Scientific Writing Editing
Review 
5-26

Job Loss, Job Search and Retirement.  5-20

Tax Law Change. 
Relocation and :Grosss Up

Habits.  Top Four that
enhance your self esteem 
4-17

Artificial Intelligence. 
Best Jobs and Predictions  4-14

Update on Financial Record-keeping  4-12

Professional Profile 7. 
4-5  Technology Specialist,
Science and Technology Patent LLC

Professional Profile 6. 
2-23  Senior Supervisor
Immunoassay disease detection
 
Professional Profile 5. 
2-11  Policy and Advocacy Fellow
at Society for Neuroscience

Professional Profile 4. 
1-21  Pharmaceutical Process
Research

Professional Profile 3. 
1-20  Field Application Scientist
Professional Profile 2. 
1-19  Medical Science Liaison
Professional Profile 1. 
1-15  QUESTIONS.  Applied energy research, Photographic

Production and Process Research, Adjunct

International Travel
New Requirements  3-27

Plan S.  OPEN ACCESS
journals 
3-25

Online Platforms
Suggestions from Clint Watts  3-16

Recommended Reading
8.  12-29

End of Year Career Management 2018  12-23

comments (0)
09/07/19
References following Job Interviews
Filed under: Recent Posts, Interviewing, Position Searching, Mentoring, Observ. Trends, Alternate Career Paths
Posted by: site admin @ 6:17 pm

One of critical pieces of data you must have ready in an interview
is a list of at least three references.

.
Along with this, please know it is critical to have asked those
individuals whether they are available to provide good references
for you.  To help them do their job, it is so critical to provide
a current CV or resume and with whom you have or will be
interviewed.
.
Recommendation references can be requested via mail and email,
 and 
also via email in a phone call where there is an actual
conversation between an interviewer and your reference.
.
I have known HC for nearly ten years where we have worked on
her career path search process.  Her goal from the beginning has 
been to work in a government research lab or federal department
as a scientist/ chemist.  After her Ph.D. she gained a post doc position
in a field related to pharmaceutical sciences.  A four year R&D role
and academic positions followed.  In each, she has come up to speed
quickly and made creditable contribution.
.
Earlier this year, I strongly recommended her for the academic
role.  To prepare me for this we had a telecon to help me develop
an understanding of her motivation and qualifications.  The process
followed where I wrote a supporting letter to the search committee.
Since I have not been a supervisor or co-worker, I perform as
a professional personal reference and provide a brief summary
of my background as a manager and interviewer and teaching
professional skills as a consultant and adjunct for many.
.
Ideal references need to provide your assets and specific examples.
So, it is important that you know he or she will be able to do
this.  Rank of the individual is less significant than their ability
and experience supporting your candidacy.  
.
If your reference is asked to conduct a phone reference
conversation, it may be a sign that your quite highly considered
for the opening and the conversation will “close the deal”.  So
it was for HC, there was a strong positive reaction to the interview
process.  Yet one of the other three references failed to respond.
This could be a situation where you are asked to provide three
references and where you add a fourth, just in case. 

References for professional positions, you should:
-  Have a list of four four professionals–name, title, affiliation,
address, phone (confirm the right one for interviewers to use), email.
(Senior level positions could require 5 to 7.)

-   Obtain permission and availability to provide a good reference
for you
-   Keep your references aware of your progress.
-   Send current resume, CV, cover letter and related documents to
your references.
-   Thank your references, letting them know you appreciate their efforts.
-   When leaving a position, thank your supervisor in that role for their
role with respect to you.
-   Consider greeting references with a holiday card in a personal, more
than casual way.
-  Understand providing a reference requires thought, time and know-how.
Find ways of professionally recognizing them for doing more.
 
2 comments
07/25/19
Legal Issues. Provisional and Utility patent applications and C-i-p,
Filed under: Recent Posts, First Year on Job, Legal matters, Alternate Career Paths
Posted by: site admin @ 7:03 pm

Realizing most scientists and engineers receive little
specific training in grad school or their careers related
to patent applications.  It is instructive to see the next
in the series of contributions  by
Taylor Jennings and Maria Inman.

.
Their summary reveals the significant content:  contains a 
synopsis of the discovery of Lithium - LiMPO4 materials
followed by (1) filing provisional patent applications, (2)
filing of utility patent application, and (3) filing continuation -
in - part patent applications,  
.
The strong article clarifies differences  between the two
kinds of applications and the requirements to maintain 
filing date.  
Provisional Patent application
  -claims NOT required
  -will not be examined and not issued as a patent
  -cannot claim domestic or foreign priority
  -21 year term if nonprovisional is filed in 12 months.
(utility is a nonprovisional patent application)
The Jennings and Inman series of Interface articles is
essential reading.  
comments (0)
07/11/19
Hot Buttons. 3. Women in Scientific Leadership Roles
Filed under: Recent Posts, Mentoring, Leadership, Mature professionals, Observ. Trends, Alternate Career Paths
Posted by: site admin @ 10:12 am

In the days in mid-20th century, women were a smaller
fraction of class members in math, geology, chemistry,
and physics
classes in many departments.  This population
dynamic resulted in fewer women in scientific leadership
(decision-making) roles.

.
Implementation of programs to reach more representative
fraction of balance in leadership can benefit from thoughtful
attention, like Melinda Gates book 
The Moment of Lift: How Empowering Women
Changes the World
She argues that there are unseen benefits by broadening
the equality balance.  While many organizations feel it is
nice to do but do not sense the “pipeline” permits more of
the perceived minority.  In fact it is quite analogous to people
of non-Americans natives in emerging industries– their
different approaches and perspectives offers great benefits. 
It often starts with men and men in families.
.
Ms. Gates writes about how Bill Gates driving his children
to school a couple of days a week moved other families
to share the transportation task in their families as well.
1 comment
06/03/19
Hot buttons. 1. Motivation underpinnings Financialization and Laws
Filed under: Recent Posts, Position Searching, Legal matters, Observ. Trends, Alternate Career Paths
Posted by: site admin @ 7:35 am

This entry starts a new dialogue called “hot buttons.”

This first button is “Motivation”.  I found it curious what
Ladders” articulated on this topic, that for:
  newbies (1-2 years) -  “new skills or new knowledge and self
pride in accomplishing a task”
  individual contributors (3-7 yrs) - “frequent communication
with higher ups” and value 
in work life balance [whatever that
evolving concept means]
  mid-career (8-15 yrs) - “contribute to their organization’s
overall mission, goals”
  sages (>16 yrs) - being able to and in a position to ‘get
things done.’
.
It seems that business schools have influenced “motivation” as
Kellogg’s School program attests.  Their program offers finding
two or three personal drivers from five — 1- accomplishing meaningful
goals, 2-being part of a collaboration, 3-gaining status, 4-directing and 
controlling your activities, and 5-being part of a larger effort.
.
This blog recognizes these academic elements.  There are
two subsurface realities in our capitalistic system that need
to be realized. 
Reality 1 money-profit- and advantage dominates the economy
of the chemical enterprise.  It is a big business.
[Think of bankruptcies, mergers, patent infringements, and
technology generations.]
Reality 2legal contracts and laws of commerce in different
societies projects a ‘larger than life’ influence on results that
happen.  [Mores in societies evolves over time…think of race
and gender equity.]
Few of my mentors shared this with me early in my career.


 
comments (0)
05/26/19
Gig Economy. Scientific Writing Editing Review
Filed under: Recent Posts, Position Searching, Mature professionals, Legal matters, Observ. Trends, Alternate Career Paths
Posted by: site admin @ 6:12 am

Say, you have strong technical writing skills in English.
Say, you have time (more than 4 hours a day) and credentials
that clearly show proven skills in improving technical
communications.

.
Well, there is a need, that some societies promote, is available
It is an interesting avocation for some, but I am not advocating
it.  As I contacted an excellent technical writer to seek her 
“take” on this proposal.  As an article by Joanne Chen observes,
while many people look at on-site reviews for determining
a purchase decision, objective assessment from a trusted 
colleague will do better for you.
.
I shared Enago’s offering with Lisa Balbes and bring up several
of her noteworthy comments.  The remuneration is sub-standard, 
sometimes it is not equitable and not timely, the feedback on
performance can seem arbitrary, without recourse..  Other,
online reviews also point out caution.
.
She wisely points out that payment in advance and individual
contracts with stated expectations can avoid many troubles.
comments (0)
04/14/19
Artificial Intelligence. Best Jobs and Predictions
Filed under: Recent Posts, Position Searching, Legal matters, Observ. Trends, Alternate Career Paths
Posted by: site admin @ 8:36 am

Readers of this blog might look at recent reports for: 

   looking for best jobs
.
  companies are predicting when employees will quit
IBM Watson and GM have a “predictive attrition program” which
assesses employee flight risk and offers proactive steps to retain
those employees.
Career path assessments and key employee skill area predictions
are also AI targets..
Ginni Rometty predicts AI will change 100 % of jobs in the future.
.
Suggestion:  While it is nice to track trends, finding what
is likely to happen in the future and how to prepare for it
is better for our futures.
  
comments (0)
04/05/19
Professional Profile. 7
Filed under: Recent Posts, Interviewing, Position Searching, Networking, Mentoring, First Year on Job, Legal matters, Alternate Career Paths
Posted by: site admin @ 8:01 am

Profile:  Technology Specialist, Science and Technology Patent LLC

Style and Responsibilities
Proficient in both experimental and computational exploration of
synthesis and evaluation.  Developed technology assessment 
experience through post-doc and internship.

Personable and highly organized with different cultures.  

Position involves bringing technical skills to bear on business 
strategy and best legal practices for technology concept protection
for biomaterials, formulations, optophotonic electronics, food
and nanomaterials.

Challenges and Stresses
Time is currently a limited resource with long commute, 
management of household with preschool children and 
current housing arrangement.  Am using mentors to figure
out longer term strategies  and encouragement to ask questions
and seek help.

Landing Current position and openness to new opportunities
The search for my current position that I started a month ago
faced several hurdles.  We became new parrents, had my
work papers approved and dealt with several months break in
appointments.  Yet we were successful due to persistence,
preparation and practice.

Just as one might expect, as soon as I started a new position
other opportunities arise.  While the benefits package is quite
satisfactory and meets our needs (eg.  salary exceeds ACS
Salary Comparator benchmark), I will find a way to accept
interview invitations.  I do not do them from my employer’s
locations nor on employer’s time.  I keep all engagements 
confidential and record notes.

Interestingly, since this is a legal position “billable hours”
is a new work constraint that I am learning to include in my
agenda.

Opportunities for Growth
In addition to a highly skilled staff and generous benefits,
the firm offers continuous in-house training, support for
personal growth and patent agent certification and help
in pursuing a legal education.  
1 comment
02/23/19
Professional Profile. 6.
Filed under: Recent Posts, Position Searching, First Year on Job, Observ. Trends, Alternate Career Paths
Posted by: site admin @ 2:24 pm
Profile:  Senior Supervisor Immunoassay disease detection.

- What do you say when asked about your personal style and responsibilities? 
I would say my personal style is pretty easy to work with and always trying to
accommodate others reasonable requests within my ability. My responsibility
I would say it’s really to help others, either it’s the upper management or my
colleagues. 
- Are you challenged?  What stresses you? 
I’m definitely challenged at work, but I welcome that as it gives me a sense
of accomplishment. As with any projects, finding and managing resources can
be pretty stressful, but I think our team are doing pretty well so far.

- Describe your title, how long you have been in your role and your most
enjoyable responsibilities and tasks. 
I currently hold a supervisory role and I enjoy very much working with my team
to meet our targets and present our work together to the cross functional team.

- How did you land your current position?  Do you continuously keep an open
mind to changing positions?  How long should we stay in our positions? 
I started as a scientist role in my current company and was approached by my
current boss to work on a special project that expands our companies current
portfolio, which I thought was and still is pretty interesting. As my experience
grows, I always think about the next step, for which I have continuous dialogue
with my current boss.

- What do you believe aided you in being awarded your position? 
Not afraid to take on really challenging but low visibility tasks.

- Have you refused an offer that you think you should have taken?  What were
the factors in your decision? 
Yes, long term professional growth was probably the biggest reason I decided
to refuse. The offer I refused was definitely a much better short term offer, but
I think I made the right decision.

- What opportunities and challenges do you see provide growth for you? 
Right now, gaining experience in resource and project management is the
biggest learning opportunity for me.

- What are ways that you go out of your way to expand your network? 
So far, I think not being afraid to ask for help and others advice has helped.

What comments do you wish to make for people who are graduating or
planning on moving on in the next year? 
Keep an open mind, what you do after graduating may be different than
what you studied for 5+ years. Be prepared for the interview and know your
audience before your presentation, expect questions on anything you put
up on the slides, sometimes it’s the small details that trip people over.

comments (0)
02/11/19
Professional Profile. 5.
Filed under: Recent Posts, Position Searching, Networking, Job Offer (Situations), First Year on Job, Observ. Trends, Alternate Career Paths
Posted by: site admin @ 8:04 am


Profile: Policy & Advocacy Fellow at Society for Neuroscience


- What do you say when asked about your personal style and responsibilities?

In terms of overall work, I like to be given a project and work independently, while knowing where to go for help if needed. It’s also very important for me to know where my work fits into the overall mission of the group, and that we all work together towards a common goal- that is usually very motivating for me. I also typically enjoy being given a great deal of responsibility in my work, as I take that as a sign of trust and therefore try to achieve the goals at hand as best I can. I try to utilize these principles in my current job, where I am part of a great team and also feel that I am given enough freedom to learn, explore, and manage projects and assignments. We have plenty of meetings about various aspects of the work, which is very helpful. I enjoy the group interactions as well as the independent work.  


- Are you challenged?  What stresses you?

I’m challenged every day in the sense that I am faced with having to find something, learn a new system or vocabulary- sometimes I am challenged in terms of time constraints, other times because I am working on a task that I’ve never done before. But this also contributes to the value of this experience. I was lucky enough to be given this opportunity to be a Policy & Advocacy Fellow at Society for Neuroscience. This is my first exposure to working in a department where there is a blend of biomedical PhDs and those from other backgrounds, and first time working for a scientific society and seeing how that works, while also learning more about policy & advocacy. I enjoy being fully immersed in all the novel experiences in this position, whether they are in the office, or outside going to Hill events (which is a lot of fun!). What stresses me is sometimes the element of surprise or changing circumstances, meetings or tasks, although currently I am fascinated by everything and soaking it all in. In general, I like stability, but in some cases, especially if it’s something I am interested in and wanting to learn more about, I welcome chaos and embrace new things no matter how hectic it is, because I know it’s a tremendous learning opportunity and I feel passionate about it. I suppose a lot of how we approach life comes down to our attitude towards things- if we think that something is exciting and we are grateful for it, we will enjoy it more. I am also stressed sometimes about not knowing what comes next in my career, however from past experience, my plans don’t usually work out but something else works out which typically turns out to be even better than I could have ever imagined. So I’m trying to learn a bit of the art of “going with the flow” and seeing where my interests and passions will lead, and enjoy the process.


- Describe your title, how long you have been in your role and your most enjoyable responsibilities and tasks.

I am the Policy & Advocacy Fellow at Society for Neuroscience. I started in this role on January 2, 2019. I enjoy having variety in my day, therefore the ideal day is a combination of office work and Hill time, which is not very common (although Hill Day in March will be exciting). The idea of interacting with people outside the office during the workday for networking is really important, and I’m trying to also take advantage of living in D.C. and engage in experiences outside of work as well, because there is so much here for me to learn from and I don’t want to miss useful opportunities. In terms of specifics, I enjoy drafting letters and working on excel sheets with information, especially if I know what the goal for them is, and in particular if they are collaborative efforts. It’s exciting to contribute to a collective project in the office, but I also enjoy being out of the office to and getting some practical experience.


- How did you land your current position?  
Do you continuously keep an open
mind to changing positions?  
How long should we stay in our positions?

I had some prior science policy experience. Once I realized that I wanted to pursue this as a career path, I applied to relevant jobs that fit my background. Out of all the jobs I applied to and interviewed for, this was my favorite, so I am very happy to be in it now. I searched for and applied to jobs for some time, and in the process learned the right level of job to apply for, my application materials improved and my Skype interview skills sharpened with each conversation. This position just happened to be there at the right time, I was very excited about it (which probably showed in the process!) and it was just a really good fit overall. I was happy to learn that, when I got the position, everyone in the office unanimously voted that it should be me. I am reminded of this every day and I am really grateful for how accepting and welcoming they have been towards me since the very beginning. I’m also lucky to be in a really good working environment, which I didn’t always have. I think we should stay in our positions for as long as we are still learning and growing in them, and when it starts becoming boring and not useful, switch. We should not switch if it’s challenging, however, only if there are good reasons to do it. We should always be striving to better ourselves and thus look for that next thing that will allow us to accomplish that. The exception to this is a situation where the environment is really toxic or detrimental to our well-being, in that case we should leave it immediately.


- What do you believe aided you in being awarded your position?

I had demonstrated prior interest and passion in the area that I was looking to get hired for, and this position was a logical next step for me. I was able to articulate what I had previously learned and done, but also knew exactly why I wanted this position. I was looking for exactly this type of experience as the next step in my career. Although I had some experience with policy, I had never worked in a department like this. I work hard and I think I had demonstrated that in the past, so I came across as someone who was reliable and whom they could count on for pretty much any task at hand, which I imagine is what they were looking for. Finally, I also had the scientific background, and I believe they wanted a PhD graduate for this position, and that serves me well now as I am able to apply that background to this position. At the same time, I am also learning the policy & advocacy side of it, which is what I wanted to learn. Overall this is a win-win situation, and I think that everyone on the team is gaining from it. Plus, it is a really good working environment which is great.


- Have you refused an offer that you think you should have taken?  
What were the factors in your decision?

Not an offer. There were other potential interviews on the horizon when I decided to accept this one, and some of those were more long-term and potentially more stable as well. But this was my only offer I had at the time, and I didn’t want to wait any longer before moving in this direction, so I accepted immediately. At the time I was still toying with several options as to where I wanted my career to go, and I applied for jobs in two different directions along the same continuum. In a sense it was maybe a bit of a coin toss in terms of which one would work out first. Interestingly, I interviewed for the other type of job first, and I got pretty far in the process (I got to the in-person interview) but then ended up not getting the job, which I was very disappointed by. In retrospect, I am grateful that happened because it determined my direction towards something else that I instinctively knew was the right thing for me, and my current position was exactly that. I remember saying to a friend after I didn’t get the other job offer that it would be ideal for me to work in policy at a scientific society. I am now doing that, so it couldn’t have worked out any better!


- What opportunities and challenges do you see provide growth for you?

Right now this position is both a tremendous opportunity and challenge at the same time, and I took the job knowing that it would be both, and I need both. I haven’t entirely figured out where to go from here, but I am learning more every day about what my future interests might be and where I might want to take it, just by being exposed to various experiences. My opportunity right now is to work with people from a different background, and learn how they think about the same issue that I am bringing my scientific expertise to. This is really valuable. The challenge is that I to put myself in situations which are outside of my comfort zone. I purposely seek them out because I know they will be growth opportunities for me. Sometimes this means talking to someone I might be intimidated by, so I force myself to just go up to them and start talking! This job is definitely teaching me how to network, and I find it’s getting easier overtime. I also often seek out projects that I know nothing about but could help with, in order to gain that expertise and grow in a different direction that I might not have explored otherwise.


- What are ways that you go out of your way to expand your network?

Being in DC provides a lot of opportunities to meet people, and I find that most people are happy to have an afternoon coffee and talk about what they do. This is usually very  informative for me, and provides good practice for me in talking about my interests and goals to as many people as possible. The interesting thing is that I almost always get a different response, a new perspective, or a resource I didn’t have before. I attend some events related to work, and others on my own in particular if they are on something I am interested in (for example at the NASEM) but wouldn’t have the opportunity attend in person otherwise. I also try to go to social events related to policy work, where either peers or higher level experts would be present, and seek to meet both types of people. I find that talking with peers is helpful for practicing my pitch before going up to someone who might be more intimidating.


- What comments do you wish to make for people who are graduating or planning on moving on in the next year?

I would say that career exploration should be a constant endeavor, and not done only when you are in your last year of your PhD, for example. Don’t wait until the end to try and figure out what you might want to do. Every day is an opportunity to explore something new, and everything you do can change your career trajectory. If you work in the lab, get out and meet people, especially those from different research areas or non-scientific backgrounds, because you will learn a lot. Keep an eye out for opportunities to grow and help others in your community. Never stop learning and growing, and find opportunities that will facilitate both of these things.


comments (0)
01/21/19
Professional Profiles. 4.
Filed under: Recent Posts, Networking, Alternate Career Paths
Posted by: site admin @ 7:28 am
Profile:
Pharmaceutical Process Research

- What do you say when asked about your personal style and responsibilities?
I have never been asked that question but it is good question which I will prepare for my next interview.   


- Are you challenged?  What stresses you?
Yes. Working on a work visa can be stressful because you cannot plan long term for practically any aspect of your life. 


- Describe your title, how long you have been in your role and your most enjoyable responsibilities and tasks.
Research Scientist. I have been in this role for a year. The responsibilities I enjoy the most include troubleshooting the formulation and process related issues for iotech startup customers from all over the world. 


- How did you land your current position?  Do you continuously keep an open mind to changing positions?  How long should we stay in our positions?
Job interview. Yes, now that I have a better idea of the spectrum of opportunities available in my current company, I would like to branch out and learn more in the field of drug development in about a year’s time from now. 


- What do you believe aided you in being awarded your position?
My Postdoctoral advisor’s influence in the pharma industry.


- Have you refused an offer that you think you should have taken?  What were the factors in your decision?
Yes. I had to give up on an informal but direct offer from a top pharma company because the company’s policies did not allow sponsorship of my work visa. I told the R&D manager that I will go ahead and accept offer from my current company and will stay in touch with her. That was the end of the interview process. 


- What opportunities and challenges do you see provide growth for you?
The ability to interact with the experts in my field provides me an opportunity to build a long-term perspective about the pharma industry and the potential career milestones I need to be aware of. One of the biggest challenge faced by the pharma industry is their conservative approach towards the drug development process that makes the entire process more tedious and sometimes more expensive. This conservative approach provides me an opportunity to suggest scientifically acceptable cheaper alternatives. 


 - What are ways that you go out of your way to expand your network?
Attend conferences. Volunteer to take on-site customers out for lunch or dinner. Stay in touch with seniors and peers from your academic lab because you never know whom they will introduce you to. 


 - What comments do you wish to make for people who are graduating or planning on moving on in the next year  
Talk to seniors and professionals in your network before you commit to your next organization. People are usually very helpful in sharing their professional experiences.

comments (0)
01/20/19
Professional Profiles. 3.
Filed under: Recent Posts, Networking, Alternate Career Paths
Posted by: site admin @ 6:55 am
Profile
Field Application Scientist

- What do you say when asked about your personal style and responsibilities?

I think I am  a “people person.”  I enjoy talking about science with peers. I try to engage with customers with friendly approach, which is critical in my position as I need to develop good working collaborations with them.  I chose to become field applications scientist because I thought it would give me opportunities to communicate science without having to do it inside four walls.  As a field applications scientist (FAS) I have two main responsibilites- 1) presales-  as a technical expert help account managers to drive business in a given territory.   2) to help customers in their projects (like a consultant) after they adopt our product and train them in using it. This is where friendly approach is useful because customers then feel comfortable talking about their projects openly with me. 
.

- Are you challenged?  What stresses you?

The current job responsibilities offer many challenges with exciting opportunities. The challenging part is understanding customer needs and delivering customer centric presentations. there is always some stress when you need to convert to sale and help account managers do that. but luckily FASs are not required to close deals.
Another exciting and challenging responsibility is to stay abreast in latest scientific developments. Let it be new scientific applications for the technology or developments related to clinical trials of a new drug and how company’s product would help in that.  
.

- Describe your title, how long you have been in your role and your most enjoyable responsibilities and tasks.

I have been working as FAS for almost three years. and I currently enjoy it for aforementioned reasons. 


- How did you land your current position?  Do you continuously keep an open
mind to changing positions?  How long should we stay in our positions?

I got this position through networking with recruiters. (my previous job was also through developing connection at a scientific conference). I am open for changing positions when there is a feeling of saturation or when there are no more opportunities for growth at current position. it is important to not get into comfort zone– Growth follows if we take on new challenges.  
.

- What do you believe aided you in being awarded your position?

I think having a proactive approach during job applications helped me secure current position. for example- learning how to prepare a good resume, discussing with mentors and peers about my career interests, staying in touch with recruiters and my network.

.
- Have you refused an offer that you think you should have taken?  What were the factors in your decision?

I did refuse one Postdoc offer. It is always difficult to refuse an offer that you already accepted, but when I look back, I think I made a very good decision. That time I had another offer for Applications position. Then I considered- what my priorities are, does the postdoc position offer me ample opportunities to grow my career where i would like it to be. The applications position seemed to be fulfilling those priorities, so I made decision to refuse postdoc position. Having said that, I knew this would cause inconvenience to the PI, so I remembered to acknowledge that, apologized for the inconvenience that my decision would cause  and suggested few good candidates that were suitable for the Postdoc position. 

.
- What opportunities and challenges do you see provide growth for you?

Opportunity to work on the commercial side while keeping close contact with R&D has been very helpful. 
In addition,working for sales is quite challenging. I believe, B2B sales gives lot of opportunities to grow in career. It can develop some personal skills and gives exposure that can have major impact in career.

.
- What are ways that you go out of your way to expand your network?

I attend conference meetings, try to connect secondary connections through one on one meetings etc. 
.

What comments do you wish to make for people who are graduating or planning on moving on in the next year?


My suggestion would be to keep career options open. And If you do the same thing that you are good at, it wont open new opportunities. So be open for new ideas, skills, and opportunities. 

Also, i remember that during my job application process while at graduate school, I had to take “inside-out” approach. Meaning, i had to learn how the job market is, learn how to write a resume that is specific to the job posting, what do employers expects from applicants etc - you sell what other person wants to buy. Not to sell something that you have but the other person is hardly interested in. What I mean by this is that, in resumes, graduate students often highlight their academic achievements which industry may not care about rather than looking at the job responsibilities and what is needed. ( i remember making such mistake in my first few resumes)  
comments (0)
01/19/19
Professional Profiles. 2.
Filed under: Recent Posts, Networking, Alternate Career Paths
Posted by: site admin @ 11:42 am
Profile:
MSL+ Medical Science Liaison
 I have always looked ahead to what might be next-where is there a gap. That’s what will keep people employed in my opinion.
Principal Research Scientist and Technical Fellow

Professional Development Facilitator, University

- What do you say when asked about your personal style and responsibilities?
When you say “style” I immediately think of management style-I think because that’s so critical to success in a job whether you’re the manager, or you’re being managed as an individual contributor. They say people don’t quit jobs, they quit bad bosses, and in my case that’s definitely true. I stayed at a job where I wasn’t properly rewarded/recognized/compensated for many years because I had a great boss who supported me and my ideas, gave me freedom and didn’t micromanage me, and protected me from the “nasties” in the company so I could do my work without needless interruptions and political bologna. In short, I knew he had my back. That’s worth more than any amount of money. I think that understanding that everyone has a life outside of work, and certain stresses-whether they be familial, marital, health, financial, whatever-is key to being a successful manager. If you can support your employees when they need flexibility it engenders a deep sense of loyalty. And that’s part of why I stayed at that job so long!
.
Responsibilities-here what comes to mind are moral and ethical considerations when working at a large corporation. Money is the ruler of the roost. It’s not easy to stand up and shoot down a project that’s looks like an “easy win” for the business because it’s bad science or it might hurt a patient. But that’s the job of a scientist. That means there are some people who will not like you. It’s important to hold true to your moral compass when faced with bullies who are just trying to push their own agenda, collect a big fat bonus check, and be long gone before the shit ever hits the proverbial fan. Scientists and engineers tenures tend to be much longer than business partners who turn over every 2-5 years. They have a lot less to lose.
.
- Are you challenged?  What stresses you?
Challenged as in intellectually? Seldom. Interested, often. Mostly the challenging part of my work is dealing with the personalities and egos present everywhere (my own included). What stresses me out is not feeling a sense of place in a the company (not being valued) or feeling like the work isn’t valued.

.
- Describe your title, how long you have been in your role and your most enjoyable responsibilities and tasks.
Currently, MSL. About one year. Most enjoyable task is rounding with the surgeons and meeting patients who have received our therapy-there is nothing better. 

.
- How did you land your current position?  Do you continuously keep an open
mind to changing positions?  How long should we stay in our positions?
Word of mouth.

Yes.
It depends on the job, the economy and personal factors such as home life-marriage, family, ageing parents. kids in school, ability to sell a house, et cetera. You (generally) have the most freedom before you start collecting a large paycheck and take on a mortgage and family…maybe a boat or a lovely pair of horses. (LOL).
.
- What do you believe aided you in being awarded your position?
My experience and openness to move to a riskier situation.
- Have you refused an offer that you think you should have taken?  What were the factors in your decision?

Possibly-I declined an offer in Europe just out of grad school (with what was at the time Synthes, in Oberdorf Switzerland). It was a great offer but I couldn’t pull the trigger and I wasn’t sure why. Several months later my dad was diagnosed with cancer and he was dead within the year. If I had taken that job I would have missed the last months of his life. Trust your gut, even if you don’t understand it. 

- What opportunities and challenges do you see provide growth for you?
Changing to new technology platforms that are very different than what I have experience in-it changes the way you think about approaching problems and exposes you to new ways of doing things. 

Teaching and teaching others to teach-never easy. 
Service work-there are so many people who have problems we don’t know about and we may have solutions they need-it could be a great product or device to help someone. 

- What are ways that you go out of your way to expand your network?
Even when I’m tired I meet people-for lunches, or attend events they’re going to. There’s nothing as good as face time with people in your network. Keep a broad network of people older and younger than you-you can learn from both. I try to check in with people a couple of times a year and if I know they attend a specific conference plan ahead to meet up. A large network of people who you don’t know, or who don’t care about you is pretty useless in my opinion. Your network will grow over time, like a garden. If you plant too much you can’t care for any of it properly. Select and tend to relationships that you care about the most, and over time you will see the fruits of your labors. 


What comments do you wish to make for people who are graduating or planning on moving on in the next year?
Plan carefully, but once you’ve looked at all the factors don’t use your brain, use your heart. You’ll make the right decision. 



+  MSL = requires a “D” degree-so MD, PharmD or PhD. It used to be a minimum of 10 years of experience but now new grads can get these jobs. It kind of depends on the company and what they are looking to do. I honestly don’t feel super qualified to talk about MSL roles as mine is kind of odd. There is an MSL society.

comments (0)
01/15/19
Professional Profiles. 1
Filed under: Recent Posts, Mature professionals, Alternate Career Paths
Posted by: site admin @ 9:50 am

This blog entry is aimed at exposing introspection.  Asking what
are each of us are thinking and feeling.  I asked several individuals
if they would be willing to respond to a series of questions.
.

I read an article about goal setting for different personality types
recently and wish to offer an alternative vein of thought.  It starts
with WE CANNOT PREDICT THE FUTURE.  But we can learn
from experience.
.
The questions:

1. Describe your title and most enjoyable responsibilities and
tasks?

2. How did you land your current position?

3. What do you believe aided you in enhancing your candidacy?

4. What opportunities and challenges do you see to provide
growth for you?

5. What is your experience for the length of time for positions
before you see people moving on to another professional positions?

7. What are special ways in which you expand you network?

8. What comments do you wish to make for people who are
graduating or planning on moving on in the next year?

=========================
Starting with the first profile– 

Positions:  Applied Researcher, Rechargeable Batteries,
          Solar Energy, Complex Fluids for technical applications

.              Photographic Chemistry Process
Chemist, Process Safety, Scale-Up, Process Analysis

.            University Adjunct and
Professional Behaviors, Workshop & Seminar Presenter

Personal Style and Responsibilities
My chemistry career span started out with JFK’s “Let’s go to the
moon” message and it was encouraged by summer laboratory research
jobs and honors research projects before grad school.  Grad school
occurred during the Vietnam War escalation and Arab Oil Embargo gas
lines.  My early career style revolved around ‘working harder than
expected,’ experiencing many different things, and being observant for
surprises and opportunities.
.
I took in that I had to aim very high and learn from rejection.  Rejection
is not permanent.  That “No:” can often mean ‘not now.’  
.
In addition, I need to learn something more  or do something special.
So, to an observer I was an assertive, analytical go-getter who worked
through all four undergraduate years on a straight and narrow path with
purposeful objectives that evolved over my career with changing
circumstances:  family, economy, business prospects, health and longevity.
.
That personal strategy operated in a time when fellowships
were a-plenty
and research was well supported.  Economic cycles, competition from
emerging technologies and war time priorities change hiring and support.
.
Being ‘dropped’ by one firm opened my eyes to keeping options available
via professional society participation and developing other income streams
for unexpected events.

ADAPT IN MID CAREER

In my first 10 years I was an individual contributor.  I soon learned that
I needed to develop leadership,
communication, and technical breadth for
problem solving skills that employers ‘hand select’ individuals for training. 
Professional
societies and networking offered one alternate way of gaining skills.   
[Began initiatives for the company related to manufacturing efficiency
at university collaborative.  Developed and completed Six Sigma projects
as a black belt master.] 

ASK FOR HELP AND HELP OTHERS

Many times companies do not reward employees for
participating in
professional and technical societies.  Oh, they don’t [surprised?]? 
.
It was interesting that by volunteering to
support as a member-volunteer,
I learned many insider skills, met hundreds of
informative and distinguished
professionals and grew as a professional
scientist.  The more I gave, much
more
did I receive in benefits and experience.
.
The mid-career span was quite stressful with long, variable
hours, many
unexpected problems with complex causes, business challenges—take-overs,
mergers, change of managers and business objectives, and bankruptcies.
[Be thankful, express appreciation and optimism.]
.
I started interviewing for ‘other positions’ about five years
after graduate
school.  Learned thant not having the experience
and training for managing
and leadership slotted me for only entry level roles.  I perhaps stayed too long
for career  advancement purposes at my applied research positions.  That
was
my background and I did not ask for specific opportunities (Maybe I should
have.).  Staying longer in organizations does provide pensions at the end of
my life span (not a lot, but of some value.  Bankrupt company yield PPGC
insured retirement.  Otherwise, I made some poor investment decisions and
some productive ones.).

MID-CAREER DEVELOPMENTS
.
Rather than exploring permanent positions, which many of my
contemporaries chose and were successful choosing, I pursued professional
society support, participation and leadership roles in mid-career.  In one
situation, I wished to attend a conference 50 miles away
and was unable to
obtain management approval. 
I volunteered to assist workshop AV and
projection in exchange for
registration.  Soon I was offering
workshops
and offered registration, room and board compensation at meetings
around
the country, as long as I could get time off from work.
.
Another experience involved a dinner with department faculty where
they
explored offering a graduate level course. 
This led to a decade of productive
activities near the end of my career.  Dozens of former attendees, students
and
consultees have reached out for various support roles to advance their
goals.

CONCLUSIONS
.
There are few things in a technical career better than

achieving your goals.  One of them is
having your goal helping others
maximize their skills.  Another is realizing we are one of a small
group
of people  with a common thread
holding us together.   We do not know

what is in store for the future.  We can
project and guess.  There are
many people
who have freely given of themselves to me that have
made all the difference.  I want to do the same for those who follow
me.
.
Second-guessing choices:  No.  I put 110% effort into each of my 
commitments and try not to have regrets.  I have a habit of creating
back-up plans in case we need to go in a different direction.
.
Suggestions:  Volunteer for different roles and responsibilities,
especially in professional societies.
.
Study successful people and learn their habits.  Read biographies.  

Learn and adopt worthwhile habits.  Continue to develop communication
skills. in various media.       

comments (0)
12/29/18
Recommended Reading. 8.
Filed under: Recent Posts, Job Offer (Situations), Leadership, Mature professionals, Observ. Trends, Alternate Career Paths
Posted by: site admin @ 9:01 am

1  Norman E. Rosenthal,
THE GIFT OF ADVERSITY:  The Unexpected
 Benefits of Life’s Difficulties, Setbacks and Imperfections.

2.  Ray Dalio  PRINCIPLES Simon and Shuster NY 2017

3.  Edward De Bono SIX THINKING HATS; Revised and
updated Little
Brown and Company Boston 1999
 

4.  Peter Post EMILY POST THE ETIQUETTE ADVANTAGE
IN BUSINESS 
PERSONAL SKILLS FOR
PROFESSIONAL SUCCESS William Morrow 2014 

HarperCollins NY

5.  Robert Sapolsky, BEHAVE:  THE BIOLOGY OF HUMANS AT OUR
BEST AND WORST
Penguin Press NY
  2017

6.  Amy Chua POLITICAL TRIBES:  GROUP INSTINCT AND THE FATE OF
NATIONS
Penguin Press, NY 2016

7.  Sherry Turkle RECLAIMING CONVERSATION:  THE POWER OF TALK
IN A DIGITAL AGE, Penguin
NY 2015

8.  Michael Breus THE POWER OF WHEN:  DISCOVER YOUR CHRONOTYPE
AND THE BEST TIME TO
EAT LUNCH, ASK FOR A RAISE, HAVE SEX, WRITE
A NOVEL AND MORE, Little Brown and
Company NY
  2016R

9.  Daniel Pink WHEN THE SCIENTIFIC SECRETS OF PERFECT TIMING

Riverhead Books NY 2018

10.  Malcolm Nance THE
PLOT TO HACK AMERICA Skyhorse
Publishing NY 2016

11.  Steve Sashihara, THE OPTIMIZATION EDGE:  REINVENTING DECISION
MAKING TO MAXIMIZE ALL
YOUR COMPANY’S ASSETS, McGraw Hill NY 2011

12.  Peter Bruce Andrew Bruce, PRACTICAL STATISTICS FOR DATA
SCIENTIST
O’Reilley Media 2017

13.  Malcolm Nance THE PLOT TO DESTROY DEMOCRACRACY Hatchette 2017
NY

14.  Yuval Noah Harari 21 LESSONS FOR THE 21st CENTURY,
Spiegel & Grau NY 2018

15.  Carl Zimmer A PLANET OF VIRUSES 2ND EDITION
University of Chicago
Press, Chicago London 2015

16.  Steven Brill TAILSPIN: 
THE PEOPLE AND FORCES BEHIND AMERICA’S
50-YEAR FALL-  AND THOSE FIGHTING TO REVERSE IT, Alfred
Knopf NY 2018

17.  Jaron Lanier TEN
ARGUMENTS FOR DELETING YOUR SOCIAL
MEDIA ACCOUNTS

comments (0)
12/23/18
End of Year Career Management. 2018
Filed under: Recent Posts, Interviewing, Post-docs, Legal matters, Observ. Trends, Alternate Career Paths
Posted by: site admin @ 4:31 pm
Thank you for reading the NESACS Blog for Career Management
and Development.  I appreciate your interest and following.  This
blog provides independent concerns, information on career paths,
directions on professional behaviors and job search trends and
recommendations.
.
This year we outline major subject areas covered:
         Professional Behaviors
         Job Search and Resumes
         Economics and Financial Entries
 Trends
.
Professional Behavior
Ghosting, Cat-fishing and BUMMER
Hacking, Cyberattacks
Chronotypes
Decision Making
Spam Messages
Absenteeism and Illness
Timing
Job Searching and Resumes, Profiles, Letters
Digital Formats
Good Companies List
Contract Work
Changing Jobs
Conversations in Digital Age
Letters, Thank yous
Digital Profile
Search Fundamentals
Mid-Career 
Economics and Financials
Takeovers and Mergers
Harari and Future AI
Business Dominance, Meacham
Finances, Index Card
Finances, Credit Score
Business Models
Trends
Viruses
Patents
Perovskites, Statistics, DNA
MCCree, AI
Go File
Peer Review
Safety with automation and AI
1 comment
12/22/18
Professional Behavior. Terms for interviews and social media recruitment
Filed under: Recent Posts, Interviewing, Position Searching, Observ. Trends, Alternate Career Paths
Posted by: site admin @ 6:48 pm

Professional responsibility requires that we have some idea of
terms that are used in relation to interviewing and internet and
social media searching.

.
“Ghosting” is a term describing applicants and current employees
who are impossible to reach in our tight job market.  As most early
career professionals now find many openings, it is incumbent on 
them to communicate and provide updated reliable contact 
information to recruiters.
While the article by C. Cutter views it from the recruiters’ perspective,
many of the comments and my experience is that companies more
often “ghost” candidates after contact and do not offer availability
to candidates.
.
Catfishing - behavior in social networks using senseless rejection, 
belittling, and sadism.  It is used by network profiteers to enact
behavior modification.
.
“BUMMER” is a term coined by Jaron Lanier who discusses the
pros and cons of social networks which are implemented to 
search of positions and inquire about employees.  BUMMER is
an acronym for Behaviors of Users Modified and Made into
an Empire for Rent.
.
BUMMER represents statistical algorithms that calculate the
chances that a person will act in a particular way.    The overall
population can be affected with greater probability than can any
single person.
.
Lanier outlines the components of BUMMER           
               A – attention acquisition leading 
               B – butting into everyone’s lives
               C – cramming content down people’s throats
               D – directing people’s behaviors in the sneakiest way
               E – earning money from letting the worst assholes secretly
screw with everyone else
               F -  fake modes and faker society

Fake people are present in unknown vast numbers as  Bots,
AIs agents, fake reviewers, fake friends, fake followers, fake posters,
automated catfishers.

About Social Media
.
Social media is based on “engagement.”

When people get a flattering response in exchange for posting
something they get in the habit of posting more.  It is the first
stage of an addiction that becomes a problem both for individuals
and society.  Significant aspects of increasing engagement include
randomness, economic
motivation without responsibility, and
adaptability. 

The benefits of networks only appear when
people use the
same platform.  [Think apple iphone, messaging, facetime,
and apps.]  Once the
app starts to work you are stuck with it. 

These are called “lock-ins” and they are hard to avoid in digital networks. 

We are carrying devices suitable for mass behavior modification.

We are crammed into online environments controlled by few
centers guided by
business models that involves finding
customers ready to pay to modify someone
else’s behavior.

New companies measure whether an individual changed their
behaviors
and the feeds for each person are constantly tweak
to get behaviors to change.

comments (0)
12/03/18
Good Companies List
Filed under: Recent Posts, Interviewing, Position Searching, Mature professionals, Post-docs, Technicians, Observ. Trends, Undergraduate majors, Alternate Career Paths
Posted by: site admin @ 1:40 pm

You know, it is hard to come up with a list of firms to
consider applying to.  Sure you can go to your placement
services, whether academic, commercial or governmental,
and see who they cite.

.
You can go to fields of specialization where previous people
from your area have landed positions.
.
You can take recommendations from mentors who may have
current knowledge.
.
As we are seeing, what is important to some people is not as
important to others.  I recall when I began my search, all I
heard was that finding a good post doc was critical after 
grad school.  Then, I had a mock interview with a mentor 
who offered a unique idea of looking for energy related 
fields (now this was in the 70s, just before the time of the 
Arab oil embargo in the US).  So when I was involved with
screening interviews, I accepted all that were offered and I 
could request.  Then part of my decision process involved
determining energy companies.
.
These days business aspects are paramount.  Which firms
have good management, philosophies and practices?  The 
WSJ determined a ranking of 752 firms using Peter Drucker’s
criteria of doing the right things well.  It is well worth taking
a look at the criteria and perhaps digging into the listing to
determine where you might search.  
.
It is true that other factors besides this play a role for each 
of us and that we need to define them– company culture,
location, specific fields of interest, and so forth.
.
When I perused the list at least half of the top 50 are technology
intensive companies and there are some firms that I had not
known before.  This is valuable and should be of strong 
interest to you.
Look at a number of the companies listed and go to their 
websites.
[Even get a copy of the 12-3-18 issue of the WSJ.]
comments (0)
11/26/18
Economics of the Chemical Enterprise. 6. Take-overs, Mergers, and Activist Investor Break-ups
Filed under: Recent Posts, Interviewing, Position Searching, First Year on Job, Legal matters, Observ. Trends, Alternate Career Paths
Posted by: site admin @ 7:45 pm

The Chemistry Profession encourages through the
training institutions focusing attention on exclusively
the technical side of the business.  So much of what
we face in the industrial and government realms
involves ECONOMICS.

.
This blog has offered several glimpses via entries on
this different perspective.   I could not help but exclaim
“wow” when CEN covered a story about Bain and
Pfizer forming Cerevel (10-29-18, p. 14).  The same
issue reported Deerfield and UNC organizing a
curious partnership (p. 15).
.
Dow and DuPont dominated CEN 11-19-18) after
their merger and activist investor inspired breakup
of various lower performing divisions.  (pp. 11, 22ff)
.
The latest news is from United Technologies breaking
up into three separate companies.
All these activities remind me of bank buyouts,
ESOPs (Employee Stock Ownership Plans) and 
rapid turnover of company leadership and philosophy
of the 1980s.  
So, please study and become aware of the
economics 
of the industries 
chemistry leads you into. 
Your success, stability and satisfaction will require it.
comments (0)
11/11/18
Resumes. History and Future
Filed under: Recent Posts, Position Searching, Public Relations docs, Observ. Trends, Alternate Career Paths
Posted by: site admin @ 9:52 am

Lydia Dishman wrote in Fast Company:  “The need exists for a 
summary of professional achievements, preferably verifiable
and hinting at what a person might be like to work with.”   Though
a delivery system for this information is bound to change.

.
Accompanying this future seeking view is some controversy
for first time resume writers, career changers and job-hoppers who
seek growth in low growth environments.  The overall history, 
author Dishman chronicles, includes da Vinci’s ten point ability
list in a letter to Sforza about painting the Last Supper, the French
word origin of personal summary of job skills, and changes in
sections and information to include and/or drop based on length,
format (using PCs and programs).
.
She suggests Linkedin is hastening an irrelevance.  At least nearly
nine-tenths of recruiters seek out the contents and sections of your
profile.  What is problematic is job titles, despite the advances
in keyword matching, full expedited listing of accomplishments
(often via links to documentation), and detail often not possible
in hardcopy forms.
.
With so many possible applicants, time is a premium in making
appropriate decisions without bias.
.
It is highly recommended that you create and seek out best 
practices in digital formats, which Linkedin leads.
Academic positions still do not favor the use of digital forms,
however.

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