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From the Northeastern Section of the ACS, focusing on career management and development
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03/25/19
Plan S. OPEN ACCESS Journals
Filed under: Recent Posts, Networking, Mentoring, Mature professionals, Observ. Trends
Posted by: site admin @ 1:27 pm

Another area of interest to readers might be journal articles,

where to publish and availability of publications.
I searched the ACS evolving policy and viewed the page .
This is an area we should all take note of in consideration
with what is occurring with the rest of the global scientific
community aiming for Open Access by 2020.  See details.
I was tuned into this by an editorial in Interface by Jannuzzi
who linked to Richard Kiley at University College London
who wrote about the aim of “Plan S” to ensure research that
is publicly funded to be openly available.  As a species we 
face climate change, epidemic preparedness, major disasters.
He wrote if the Liberian government being unaware of research
of the potential impact of an Ebola outbreak.  If research was
openly available and acted upon some of the thousands of
death could have delayed to their normal course.
There is a sizable cost for ACS members to participate in
OA.  We can influence this by voicing what is being done
in proactive societies giving them a competitive advantage.
comments (0)
03/16/19
On-Line Platforms. Suggestions from Clint Watts
Filed under: Recent Posts, Leadership, Mature professionals, Observ. Trends
Posted by: site admin @ 5:15 pm

Clint Watts, former FBI agent, wrote a recent book “Messing with
the Enemy” and offers some helpful suggestions.

For your work on Platforms:
1.  Ask whether the benefits outweigh the costs.  Try to
minimize social media.
APP:  Use Moment to monitor your time commitment.
2.  Pop or drop our preference bubbles. 
Know why we ‘like,’ tweet  & share items
3.  Listen or read those who oppose our preferences. 
They provide the needed
reconnaissance for opposites.
4. Pick experts who are good critical thinkers. EOA
  A. they have experience in their field and in the topics they
discuss
  B. they have many observations in their field
  C. they go through a deliberative process (analysis)
to arrive at conclusions.  Structured evaluation, ask questions.
.
About where you seek and obtain your news, consider the abbreviation CMPP
.
Competency- source capable of knowing, gathering, and understanding
the information they provide
.
Motivation- why is the source providing the information
.
 Product- type of information- audio, print, online, video, social. .
Each type conveys different meaning and
impressions of reality.
.
 Process of collection-  were sources primary or secondary. 
Was the data selected to favor a position?
Is contrary data considered and tested?

comments (0)
03/09/19
On-line Platforms. Subtle repositories of metadata
Filed under: Recent Posts, Mature professionals, Observ. Trends
Posted by: site admin @ 11:53 am

As a twist on topics the blog shares, I wish to bring up
an intriguing book that I recommend you read–   ’Zucked-

Waking up to the Facebook Catastrophe’ by Roger MaNamee,
Penguin NY 2018.
.
Unwittingly, many of us may be the fodder of metadata for
high tech internet operating organizations and platforms.
Then, we further participate and are entranced to follow
what the AI directed algorithms prescribe.
.
McNamee writes that the internet technology world follows
predictable patterns.  He points out technology has two rules
of thumb– Moore’s law about integrated circuit packing
density and Metcalfe’s rule about the increasing value of
any network being proportional to the square of the number
of nodes (or members). 
.
These result in a philosophy:
-make things appear to be free, effort-less and friction-less 
to make networks and connections engage more often and
build on habits that evolve into addictions
.
-promote a libertarian philosophy that prioritizes individuality
over the common good.  Individuals feel good about ambition
and greed.  Disruption, being first and winning becomes an
effective strategy.
.
The author highlights the role of the vision, value system
and connections a group of leaders, he calls the “Paypal
Mafia” have succcessfully promoted.  [Named are P. Thiel,
E. Musk, R. Hoffman, M. Levchin and J. Stoppleman]
.
McNamee shared the finding that MoveOn.org president
described where FB and Google feeds no longer are subject
neutral but are biased to deliver likeable content and headlines
to engage emotions.  [Ed Pariser]

A real stand out the book offers is a segment on B J.. Fogg
and Persuasion Technology that Silicon Valley firms employ
to compete, grow and prosper.  the result is that the software
designer creates the illusion of user (you and I) control, when
it is the system (and AI) that guides every action.  FB and Google
now include behavioral prediction engines that anticipate our
thoughts and emotions and offer high quality targeting for advertisers. 

2 comments
02/23/19
Professional Profile. 6.
Filed under: Recent Posts, Position Searching, First Year on Job, Observ. Trends, Alternate Career Paths
Posted by: site admin @ 2:24 pm
Profile:  Senior Supervisor Immunoassay disease detection.

- What do you say when asked about your personal style and responsibilities? 
I would say my personal style is pretty easy to work with and always trying to
accommodate others reasonable requests within my ability. My responsibility
I would say it’s really to help others, either it’s the upper management or my
colleagues. 
- Are you challenged?  What stresses you? 
I’m definitely challenged at work, but I welcome that as it gives me a sense
of accomplishment. As with any projects, finding and managing resources can
be pretty stressful, but I think our team are doing pretty well so far.

- Describe your title, how long you have been in your role and your most
enjoyable responsibilities and tasks. 
I currently hold a supervisory role and I enjoy very much working with my team
to meet our targets and present our work together to the cross functional team.

- How did you land your current position?  Do you continuously keep an open
mind to changing positions?  How long should we stay in our positions? 
I started as a scientist role in my current company and was approached by my
current boss to work on a special project that expands our companies current
portfolio, which I thought was and still is pretty interesting. As my experience
grows, I always think about the next step, for which I have continuous dialogue
with my current boss.

- What do you believe aided you in being awarded your position? 
Not afraid to take on really challenging but low visibility tasks.

- Have you refused an offer that you think you should have taken?  What were
the factors in your decision? 
Yes, long term professional growth was probably the biggest reason I decided
to refuse. The offer I refused was definitely a much better short term offer, but
I think I made the right decision.

- What opportunities and challenges do you see provide growth for you? 
Right now, gaining experience in resource and project management is the
biggest learning opportunity for me.

- What are ways that you go out of your way to expand your network? 
So far, I think not being afraid to ask for help and others advice has helped.

What comments do you wish to make for people who are graduating or
planning on moving on in the next year? 
Keep an open mind, what you do after graduating may be different than
what you studied for 5+ years. Be prepared for the interview and know your
audience before your presentation, expect questions on anything you put
up on the slides, sometimes it’s the small details that trip people over.

comments (0)
02/11/19
Professional Profile. 5.
Filed under: Recent Posts, Position Searching, Networking, Job Offer (Situations), First Year on Job, Observ. Trends, Alternate Career Paths
Posted by: site admin @ 8:04 am


Profile: Policy & Advocacy Fellow at Society for Neuroscience


- What do you say when asked about your personal style and responsibilities?

In terms of overall work, I like to be given a project and work independently, while knowing where to go for help if needed. It’s also very important for me to know where my work fits into the overall mission of the group, and that we all work together towards a common goal- that is usually very motivating for me. I also typically enjoy being given a great deal of responsibility in my work, as I take that as a sign of trust and therefore try to achieve the goals at hand as best I can. I try to utilize these principles in my current job, where I am part of a great team and also feel that I am given enough freedom to learn, explore, and manage projects and assignments. We have plenty of meetings about various aspects of the work, which is very helpful. I enjoy the group interactions as well as the independent work.  


- Are you challenged?  What stresses you?

I’m challenged every day in the sense that I am faced with having to find something, learn a new system or vocabulary- sometimes I am challenged in terms of time constraints, other times because I am working on a task that I’ve never done before. But this also contributes to the value of this experience. I was lucky enough to be given this opportunity to be a Policy & Advocacy Fellow at Society for Neuroscience. This is my first exposure to working in a department where there is a blend of biomedical PhDs and those from other backgrounds, and first time working for a scientific society and seeing how that works, while also learning more about policy & advocacy. I enjoy being fully immersed in all the novel experiences in this position, whether they are in the office, or outside going to Hill events (which is a lot of fun!). What stresses me is sometimes the element of surprise or changing circumstances, meetings or tasks, although currently I am fascinated by everything and soaking it all in. In general, I like stability, but in some cases, especially if it’s something I am interested in and wanting to learn more about, I welcome chaos and embrace new things no matter how hectic it is, because I know it’s a tremendous learning opportunity and I feel passionate about it. I suppose a lot of how we approach life comes down to our attitude towards things- if we think that something is exciting and we are grateful for it, we will enjoy it more. I am also stressed sometimes about not knowing what comes next in my career, however from past experience, my plans don’t usually work out but something else works out which typically turns out to be even better than I could have ever imagined. So I’m trying to learn a bit of the art of “going with the flow” and seeing where my interests and passions will lead, and enjoy the process.


- Describe your title, how long you have been in your role and your most enjoyable responsibilities and tasks.

I am the Policy & Advocacy Fellow at Society for Neuroscience. I started in this role on January 2, 2019. I enjoy having variety in my day, therefore the ideal day is a combination of office work and Hill time, which is not very common (although Hill Day in March will be exciting). The idea of interacting with people outside the office during the workday for networking is really important, and I’m trying to also take advantage of living in D.C. and engage in experiences outside of work as well, because there is so much here for me to learn from and I don’t want to miss useful opportunities. In terms of specifics, I enjoy drafting letters and working on excel sheets with information, especially if I know what the goal for them is, and in particular if they are collaborative efforts. It’s exciting to contribute to a collective project in the office, but I also enjoy being out of the office to and getting some practical experience.


- How did you land your current position?  
Do you continuously keep an open
mind to changing positions?  
How long should we stay in our positions?

I had some prior science policy experience. Once I realized that I wanted to pursue this as a career path, I applied to relevant jobs that fit my background. Out of all the jobs I applied to and interviewed for, this was my favorite, so I am very happy to be in it now. I searched for and applied to jobs for some time, and in the process learned the right level of job to apply for, my application materials improved and my Skype interview skills sharpened with each conversation. This position just happened to be there at the right time, I was very excited about it (which probably showed in the process!) and it was just a really good fit overall. I was happy to learn that, when I got the position, everyone in the office unanimously voted that it should be me. I am reminded of this every day and I am really grateful for how accepting and welcoming they have been towards me since the very beginning. I’m also lucky to be in a really good working environment, which I didn’t always have. I think we should stay in our positions for as long as we are still learning and growing in them, and when it starts becoming boring and not useful, switch. We should not switch if it’s challenging, however, only if there are good reasons to do it. We should always be striving to better ourselves and thus look for that next thing that will allow us to accomplish that. The exception to this is a situation where the environment is really toxic or detrimental to our well-being, in that case we should leave it immediately.


- What do you believe aided you in being awarded your position?

I had demonstrated prior interest and passion in the area that I was looking to get hired for, and this position was a logical next step for me. I was able to articulate what I had previously learned and done, but also knew exactly why I wanted this position. I was looking for exactly this type of experience as the next step in my career. Although I had some experience with policy, I had never worked in a department like this. I work hard and I think I had demonstrated that in the past, so I came across as someone who was reliable and whom they could count on for pretty much any task at hand, which I imagine is what they were looking for. Finally, I also had the scientific background, and I believe they wanted a PhD graduate for this position, and that serves me well now as I am able to apply that background to this position. At the same time, I am also learning the policy & advocacy side of it, which is what I wanted to learn. Overall this is a win-win situation, and I think that everyone on the team is gaining from it. Plus, it is a really good working environment which is great.


- Have you refused an offer that you think you should have taken?  
What were the factors in your decision?

Not an offer. There were other potential interviews on the horizon when I decided to accept this one, and some of those were more long-term and potentially more stable as well. But this was my only offer I had at the time, and I didn’t want to wait any longer before moving in this direction, so I accepted immediately. At the time I was still toying with several options as to where I wanted my career to go, and I applied for jobs in two different directions along the same continuum. In a sense it was maybe a bit of a coin toss in terms of which one would work out first. Interestingly, I interviewed for the other type of job first, and I got pretty far in the process (I got to the in-person interview) but then ended up not getting the job, which I was very disappointed by. In retrospect, I am grateful that happened because it determined my direction towards something else that I instinctively knew was the right thing for me, and my current position was exactly that. I remember saying to a friend after I didn’t get the other job offer that it would be ideal for me to work in policy at a scientific society. I am now doing that, so it couldn’t have worked out any better!


- What opportunities and challenges do you see provide growth for you?

Right now this position is both a tremendous opportunity and challenge at the same time, and I took the job knowing that it would be both, and I need both. I haven’t entirely figured out where to go from here, but I am learning more every day about what my future interests might be and where I might want to take it, just by being exposed to various experiences. My opportunity right now is to work with people from a different background, and learn how they think about the same issue that I am bringing my scientific expertise to. This is really valuable. The challenge is that I to put myself in situations which are outside of my comfort zone. I purposely seek them out because I know they will be growth opportunities for me. Sometimes this means talking to someone I might be intimidated by, so I force myself to just go up to them and start talking! This job is definitely teaching me how to network, and I find it’s getting easier overtime. I also often seek out projects that I know nothing about but could help with, in order to gain that expertise and grow in a different direction that I might not have explored otherwise.


- What are ways that you go out of your way to expand your network?

Being in DC provides a lot of opportunities to meet people, and I find that most people are happy to have an afternoon coffee and talk about what they do. This is usually very  informative for me, and provides good practice for me in talking about my interests and goals to as many people as possible. The interesting thing is that I almost always get a different response, a new perspective, or a resource I didn’t have before. I attend some events related to work, and others on my own in particular if they are on something I am interested in (for example at the NASEM) but wouldn’t have the opportunity attend in person otherwise. I also try to go to social events related to policy work, where either peers or higher level experts would be present, and seek to meet both types of people. I find that talking with peers is helpful for practicing my pitch before going up to someone who might be more intimidating.


- What comments do you wish to make for people who are graduating or planning on moving on in the next year?

I would say that career exploration should be a constant endeavor, and not done only when you are in your last year of your PhD, for example. Don’t wait until the end to try and figure out what you might want to do. Every day is an opportunity to explore something new, and everything you do can change your career trajectory. If you work in the lab, get out and meet people, especially those from different research areas or non-scientific backgrounds, because you will learn a lot. Keep an eye out for opportunities to grow and help others in your community. Never stop learning and growing, and find opportunities that will facilitate both of these things.


comments (0)
12/29/18
Recommended Reading. 8.
Filed under: Recent Posts, Job Offer (Situations), Leadership, Mature professionals, Observ. Trends, Alternate Career Paths
Posted by: site admin @ 9:01 am

1  Norman E. Rosenthal,
THE GIFT OF ADVERSITY:  The Unexpected
 Benefits of Life’s Difficulties, Setbacks and Imperfections.

2.  Ray Dalio  PRINCIPLES Simon and Shuster NY 2017

3.  Edward De Bono SIX THINKING HATS; Revised and
updated Little
Brown and Company Boston 1999
 

4.  Peter Post EMILY POST THE ETIQUETTE ADVANTAGE
IN BUSINESS 
PERSONAL SKILLS FOR
PROFESSIONAL SUCCESS William Morrow 2014 

HarperCollins NY

5.  Robert Sapolsky, BEHAVE:  THE BIOLOGY OF HUMANS AT OUR
BEST AND WORST
Penguin Press NY
  2017

6.  Amy Chua POLITICAL TRIBES:  GROUP INSTINCT AND THE FATE OF
NATIONS
Penguin Press, NY 2016

7.  Sherry Turkle RECLAIMING CONVERSATION:  THE POWER OF TALK
IN A DIGITAL AGE, Penguin
NY 2015

8.  Michael Breus THE POWER OF WHEN:  DISCOVER YOUR CHRONOTYPE
AND THE BEST TIME TO
EAT LUNCH, ASK FOR A RAISE, HAVE SEX, WRITE
A NOVEL AND MORE, Little Brown and
Company NY
  2016R

9.  Daniel Pink WHEN THE SCIENTIFIC SECRETS OF PERFECT TIMING

Riverhead Books NY 2018

10.  Malcolm Nance THE
PLOT TO HACK AMERICA Skyhorse
Publishing NY 2016

11.  Steve Sashihara, THE OPTIMIZATION EDGE:  REINVENTING DECISION
MAKING TO MAXIMIZE ALL
YOUR COMPANY’S ASSETS, McGraw Hill NY 2011

12.  Peter Bruce Andrew Bruce, PRACTICAL STATISTICS FOR DATA
SCIENTIST
O’Reilley Media 2017

13.  Malcolm Nance THE PLOT TO DESTROY DEMOCRACRACY Hatchette 2017
NY

14.  Yuval Noah Harari 21 LESSONS FOR THE 21st CENTURY,
Spiegel & Grau NY 2018

15.  Carl Zimmer A PLANET OF VIRUSES 2ND EDITION
University of Chicago
Press, Chicago London 2015

16.  Steven Brill TAILSPIN: 
THE PEOPLE AND FORCES BEHIND AMERICA’S
50-YEAR FALL-  AND THOSE FIGHTING TO REVERSE IT, Alfred
Knopf NY 2018

17.  Jaron Lanier TEN
ARGUMENTS FOR DELETING YOUR SOCIAL
MEDIA ACCOUNTS

comments (0)
12/23/18
End of Year Career Management. 2018
Filed under: Recent Posts, Interviewing, Post-docs, Legal matters, Observ. Trends, Alternate Career Paths
Posted by: site admin @ 4:31 pm
Thank you for reading the NESACS Blog for Career Management
and Development.  I appreciate your interest and following.  This
blog provides independent concerns, information on career paths,
directions on professional behaviors and job search trends and
recommendations.
.
This year we outline major subject areas covered:
         Professional Behaviors
         Job Search and Resumes
         Economics and Financial Entries
 Trends
.
Professional Behavior
Ghosting, Cat-fishing and BUMMER
Hacking, Cyberattacks
Chronotypes
Decision Making
Spam Messages
Absenteeism and Illness
Timing
Job Searching and Resumes, Profiles, Letters
Digital Formats
Good Companies List
Contract Work
Changing Jobs
Conversations in Digital Age
Letters, Thank yous
Digital Profile
Search Fundamentals
Mid-Career 
Economics and Financials
Takeovers and Mergers
Harari and Future AI
Business Dominance, Meacham
Finances, Index Card
Finances, Credit Score
Business Models
Trends
Viruses
Patents
Perovskites, Statistics, DNA
MCCree, AI
Go File
Peer Review
Safety with automation and AI
1 comment
12/22/18
Professional Behavior. Terms for interviews and social media recruitment
Filed under: Recent Posts, Interviewing, Position Searching, Observ. Trends, Alternate Career Paths
Posted by: site admin @ 6:48 pm

Professional responsibility requires that we have some idea of
terms that are used in relation to interviewing and internet and
social media searching.

.
“Ghosting” is a term describing applicants and current employees
who are impossible to reach in our tight job market.  As most early
career professionals now find many openings, it is incumbent on 
them to communicate and provide updated reliable contact 
information to recruiters.
While the article by C. Cutter views it from the recruiters’ perspective,
many of the comments and my experience is that companies more
often “ghost” candidates after contact and do not offer availability
to candidates.
.
Catfishing - behavior in social networks using senseless rejection, 
belittling, and sadism.  It is used by network profiteers to enact
behavior modification.
.
“BUMMER” is a term coined by Jaron Lanier who discusses the
pros and cons of social networks which are implemented to 
search of positions and inquire about employees.  BUMMER is
an acronym for Behaviors of Users Modified and Made into
an Empire for Rent.
.
BUMMER represents statistical algorithms that calculate the
chances that a person will act in a particular way.    The overall
population can be affected with greater probability than can any
single person.
.
Lanier outlines the components of BUMMER           
               A – attention acquisition leading 
               B – butting into everyone’s lives
               C – cramming content down people’s throats
               D – directing people’s behaviors in the sneakiest way
               E – earning money from letting the worst assholes secretly
screw with everyone else
               F -  fake modes and faker society

Fake people are present in unknown vast numbers as  Bots,
AIs agents, fake reviewers, fake friends, fake followers, fake posters,
automated catfishers.

About Social Media
.
Social media is based on “engagement.”

When people get a flattering response in exchange for posting
something they get in the habit of posting more.  It is the first
stage of an addiction that becomes a problem both for individuals
and society.  Significant aspects of increasing engagement include
randomness, economic
motivation without responsibility, and
adaptability. 

The benefits of networks only appear when
people use the
same platform.  [Think apple iphone, messaging, facetime,
and apps.]  Once the
app starts to work you are stuck with it. 

These are called “lock-ins” and they are hard to avoid in digital networks. 

We are carrying devices suitable for mass behavior modification.

We are crammed into online environments controlled by few
centers guided by
business models that involves finding
customers ready to pay to modify someone
else’s behavior.

New companies measure whether an individual changed their
behaviors
and the feeds for each person are constantly tweak
to get behaviors to change.

comments (0)
12/03/18
Good Companies List
Filed under: Recent Posts, Interviewing, Position Searching, Mature professionals, Post-docs, Technicians, Observ. Trends, Undergraduate majors, Alternate Career Paths
Posted by: site admin @ 1:40 pm

You know, it is hard to come up with a list of firms to
consider applying to.  Sure you can go to your placement
services, whether academic, commercial or governmental,
and see who they cite.

.
You can go to fields of specialization where previous people
from your area have landed positions.
.
You can take recommendations from mentors who may have
current knowledge.
.
As we are seeing, what is important to some people is not as
important to others.  I recall when I began my search, all I
heard was that finding a good post doc was critical after 
grad school.  Then, I had a mock interview with a mentor 
who offered a unique idea of looking for energy related 
fields (now this was in the 70s, just before the time of the 
Arab oil embargo in the US).  So when I was involved with
screening interviews, I accepted all that were offered and I 
could request.  Then part of my decision process involved
determining energy companies.
.
These days business aspects are paramount.  Which firms
have good management, philosophies and practices?  The 
WSJ determined a ranking of 752 firms using Peter Drucker’s
criteria of doing the right things well.  It is well worth taking
a look at the criteria and perhaps digging into the listing to
determine where you might search.  
.
It is true that other factors besides this play a role for each 
of us and that we need to define them– company culture,
location, specific fields of interest, and so forth.
.
When I perused the list at least half of the top 50 are technology
intensive companies and there are some firms that I had not
known before.  This is valuable and should be of strong 
interest to you.
Look at a number of the companies listed and go to their 
websites.
[Even get a copy of the 12-3-18 issue of the WSJ.]
comments (0)
11/26/18
Economics of the Chemical Enterprise. 6. Take-overs, Mergers, and Activist Investor Break-ups
Filed under: Recent Posts, Interviewing, Position Searching, First Year on Job, Legal matters, Observ. Trends, Alternate Career Paths
Posted by: site admin @ 7:45 pm

The Chemistry Profession encourages through the
training institutions focusing attention on exclusively
the technical side of the business.  So much of what
we face in the industrial and government realms
involves ECONOMICS.

.
This blog has offered several glimpses via entries on
this different perspective.   I could not help but exclaim
“wow” when CEN covered a story about Bain and
Pfizer forming Cerevel (10-29-18, p. 14).  The same
issue reported Deerfield and UNC organizing a
curious partnership (p. 15).
.
Dow and DuPont dominated CEN 11-19-18) after
their merger and activist investor inspired breakup
of various lower performing divisions.  (pp. 11, 22ff)
.
The latest news is from United Technologies breaking
up into three separate companies.
All these activities remind me of bank buyouts,
ESOPs (Employee Stock Ownership Plans) and 
rapid turnover of company leadership and philosophy
of the 1980s.  
So, please study and become aware of the
economics 
of the industries 
chemistry leads you into. 
Your success, stability and satisfaction will require it.
comments (0)
11/11/18
Resumes. History and Future
Filed under: Recent Posts, Position Searching, Public Relations docs, Observ. Trends, Alternate Career Paths
Posted by: site admin @ 9:52 am

Lydia Dishman wrote in Fast Company:  “The need exists for a 
summary of professional achievements, preferably verifiable
and hinting at what a person might be like to work with.”   Though
a delivery system for this information is bound to change.

.
Accompanying this future seeking view is some controversy
for first time resume writers, career changers and job-hoppers who
seek growth in low growth environments.  The overall history, 
author Dishman chronicles, includes da Vinci’s ten point ability
list in a letter to Sforza about painting the Last Supper, the French
word origin of personal summary of job skills, and changes in
sections and information to include and/or drop based on length,
format (using PCs and programs).
.
She suggests Linkedin is hastening an irrelevance.  At least nearly
nine-tenths of recruiters seek out the contents and sections of your
profile.  What is problematic is job titles, despite the advances
in keyword matching, full expedited listing of accomplishments
(often via links to documentation), and detail often not possible
in hardcopy forms.
.
With so many possible applicants, time is a premium in making
appropriate decisions without bias.
.
It is highly recommended that you create and seek out best 
practices in digital formats, which Linkedin leads.
Academic positions still do not favor the use of digital forms,
however.

comments (0)
10/30/18
Contract Work. Full time, Part time and Contract. Ownership of ideas
Filed under: Recent Posts, Job Offer (Situations), First Year on Job, Legal matters, Observ. Trends, Alternate Career Paths
Posted by: site admin @ 7:30 am

Al Sklover provided an interesting observation on the ownership of
ideas produced by employees.

.
As many of us gain employment first as a temporary employee and 
if conditions merit full time status is granted.  It is important to
learn the legal implications of contributions to work output.
.
Sklover points out
1.  work product made during the period of employment and related
to the job, can be claimed as “owned” by employer.
2.  work product, created before the period and used in the period
can also be claimed as “owned” by the employer.
3.  work product you created off the job, not in the work period of
documented hours of work, can be “owned” by the employer.
4.  work product resulting from sharing of your personal expertise
with other employees, can be “owned” by the employer.
.
Employers quite often insist that offer letters and contracts be signed
granting all rights of ownership to the employer.
Sklover has suggested in his entry that there are steps we can take to
protect creative efforts from being consider work for hire.
.
There are assignment and ethical responsibility implications especially
for contract workers.  This is a positive resource worth reading.

comments (0)
10/16/18
Virus World. Interdisciplinary short course
Filed under: Recent Posts, Networking, Observ. Trends, Alternate Career Paths
Posted by: site admin @ 2:50 pm

Carl Zimmer has written two very meaningful books recently.
One is on the world of viruses.  It creates a meaningful picture
for the world of viruses and their interaction with humans. 

.
Virus, as a term, initially meant venom from a snake or the semen
from a man.  Its meaning evolved over time to mean a contagious 
substance that could spread disease and initially used a tobacco
disease, tobacco mosaic virus. 
.
Bijerinck used virus to describe an agent in the fluid which was 
composed of 95% protein and 5% nucleic acid, a protein shell holding 
a few genes.
.
Carl Zimmer outlines eight classes of viruses and how they originated
and infect humans.  So many of these virus types are treated via 
chemical means.  Classes included-
1. rhinovirus (meaning ‘nose’ virus) spread by hands, doorknobs
2. influenza  (from the Italian)  droplets in air released from coughs,
sneezes, and runny noses
3. human papilloma virus HPV Papilloma virus require some physical
contact
4. ocean viruses -  many types in water systems, are still being  discovered
  Cholera is caused by blooms of waterborne bacteria 
which are hosts to a number of phages, that are viruses.
5. Retroviruses insert their genetic material into hosts DNA.
  HIV is spread by contact with body fluids 
6. West Nile Virus is spread by mosquito.
7. Ebola - spread by body fluids
8.  Large virus organisms and bacteriophages

comments (0)
09/28/18
OKR Systems. John Doerr
Filed under: Recent Posts, Position Searching, Mentoring, First Year on Job, Legal matters, Observ. Trends
Posted by: site admin @ 8:04 am

OKR Systems described in outline and detail in Doerr’s
book Measure What Matters:  How Google, Bono and the Gates
Foundation Rock the world with OKRs see also videos.

.
Goal setting is not bulletproof:  When there are conflicting
priorities or unclear, meaningless or arbitrarily shifting goals,
people become frustrated, cynical and demotivated.  
.
Goals may cause systematic problems in organizations due to 
narrowed focus, unethical behavior, increased risk taking,
decreased cooperation, and decreased motivation.  Hard goals
drive real progress more than easy goals.  If they are specific
results observed are on target more than vague ones.
.
For those making the transition from academic experiences
to commercial or mission oriented organizations, Doerr is
a powerful mentor.
comments (0)
09/17/18
Harari. Philosophical implications of Economics of Chemical Industry
Filed under: Recent Posts, Position Searching, Job Offer (Situations), Mature professionals, Observ. Trends
Posted by: site admin @ 1:16 pm

No body knows what will happen in the future  Yuval Harari
describes in his books and in podcasts.   [See “21 Lessons for
the 21st Century”].  The twin revolutions of information
technological disruptions and biotechnology could restructure
more than economies and societies, but also our own bodies
and thinking.

.
He finds jobs in the future will be robust if they retain a menial
and creative element.  Yet, so much of professions can be data 
managed, searched and automated.  
.
We are seeing a real “AI arms race”, led by remotely controlled
autonomous weapons.  It is rapidly leading to invading human
decision making,
.
Technological disruption_engineers are taking over.  
Ethicists and  philosophers are being lost, but incredibly missed
and needed alongside technological development.
Technologies provide immense positive outcomes, but there
can be unintended consequences and bad actors are even more likely.
.
We must remain very skeptical, questioning ideas and choices.
and defend and uphold a legal system that protects people.
There is human suffering and we must know it happens.
1 comment
09/05/18
Legal Issues. Leahy-Smith Invents Act and and Contract Provisions
Filed under: Recent Posts, First Year on Job, Legal matters, Observ. Trends, Alternate Career Paths
Posted by: site admin @ 7:18 am

 One of the areas technical professionals can use tutorials is in legal
matters.  Al Sklover does this with his outstanding blog and advice
column and ECS Interface has been offering a Patent tutorial by
Maria Inman and Jennings Taylor.  

.
Sklover points out three pertinent items in contract law…
-  Importance of Section Titles- read carefully the title and section
content and confirm they express the same thing
-  Entire Agreement- Sometimes other and previous agreements may
apply.  It is important to seek out the precise wording and specific
wording.
-  Importance of SIGNING AGREEMENTS
.
Taylor and Inman nicely document 
-  First to file in patent law changes
-  Significant detail on “Prior Art” for patents 
-  Nature of Prior disclosures in collaborations influencing patent claims.
comments (0)
07/13/18
Watch-Outs. 109. Brush-Offs, Neutrinos and Electrochemical Synthesis
Filed under: Recent Posts, Public Relations docs, Mentoring, Mature professionals, Observ. Trends
Posted by: site admin @ 6:34 am

This entry was all set to go then a terrific article on
travel came across my screen.  Let me start there …

.
Fidelity broadcasted a comprehensive article containing
travel tips that many would be advised to take heed of.
1.  Plan for the unexpected.  Medical emergencies, 
Cutting short your travel.  Natural phenomena.
2.  Know what to do in an emergency.  Contact list.
Have it available wherever you are.
3.  Get your home, auto, finances in order and secured.
.
Now to the entry.  WSJ editorial page had a
Andy Kessler 
article on “brushoffs”
.  It is an eye-opener
and worth reading, especially if the reader is early in
their career.
There are “tells” [poker analogy):  
-Pres. Clinton telling people he liked their tie.
-Person takes a call in the middle of a meeting.
-Person asks to have the material sent to office and follow
up.  No follow-up occurs.
-Person takes your business card and picks his teeth with it.
.
Neutrinos detected by a series of astronomical devices
confirming a source as a “blazar” the first known source of
extraterrestrial gamma rays.  this is the beginning of high 
energy neutrino astronomy.  This nerdy finding is like
gravitational particles and other recent discoveries that 
may introduce new concepts in science and applications.
(think:  x-rays, isotopes, DNA)
.
Using Electrochemistry to perform organic synthesis.
A half dozen authors reviewed advances in organic synthesis
that is energy and environmentally efficient in
Aldrichimica 
Acta  PP 3ff
.  They provide experimental essentials and dozens
of documented examples.  This could be a resource for
your research notebook.
comments (0)
07/06/18
Professional Behavior. Understanding Hacking and Cyber Attacks
Filed under: Recent Posts, Mentoring, First Year on Job, Legal matters, Observ. Trends
Posted by: site admin @ 8:23 pm

.One of the areas that you should keep updated on iswhat is happening in cyber-security when we get spam.

.
Another is cyber attacks especially if you are in a governmental
lab or project or other technically sophisticated project.  
Industrial spies are not commonly mentioned, but are
very real.
.
Malcolm Nance’s book just came to my attention and is worth
sharing  some of his insights.   There is an arms race in the 
cyber world and it uses special techniques like turbosquatters,
watering holes and spear-phishing.
.
More and more, IT departments need to take a defensive
strategy against these kinds of pernicious attacks. 
Historically, photographing or copying pages of reports 
and data was the mode of spying.  With systems going
digital and so much being Internet enabled, it is something
you need to understand how to protect. 
2 comments
06/30/18
Economics of the chemical enterprise. 5. Moat Nation of Steven Brill
Filed under: Recent Posts, Interviewing, Position Searching, Networking, Mature professionals, Post-docs, Legal matters, Observ. Trends, Undergraduate majors, Alternate Career Paths
Posted by: site admin @ 7:08 am

Steven Brill outlines the changes that have occurred
triggering the financialization of the chemical enterprise
that we have highlighted through the work of Rana Faroohar 

.
Brill points out that business today has taken on a new meritocracy
with a “get rich quick” philosophy that works through cut-throat
tactics  and the flooding of political influence money that no 
longer prioritizes the common good, but “win at any cost” for
the privileged few.
.
The resulting model finds successful businesses protected by
“moats” that shield off predators.  Moats he describes as good
product lines, great reputations, predominant market share and 
sterling management who hire the best of the best teams that
savvy investors will seek out. 
.
More and more we see AI and robotics impinge on human
roles.  So in addition to seeking cognifying roles in our careers, 
consider what John Meacham has urged
  - do practical work in the political sphere employing your highest
principles
   - respect and insist on true facts and deploy reason (avoid 
dictators who lie frequently assuming that repetition will lead to
concurrence)
   - keep history in mind.
.
Just doing chemistry is not enough for professionals.


1 comment
06/25/18
Trends in Technical Careers. Tandem solar Cells, Multi-stranded DNA, and Significant Digits in Statistics
Filed under: Recent Posts, Mature professionals, Observ. Trends, Alternate Career Paths
Posted by: site admin @ 5:57 pm

Three informative items came across my desk that I wish to
share.  These are either benchmarks of progress or inflection
points for the next technology generation.

.
The first is about using statistics to provide an interpretation 
of the uncertainty of a measurement.  It may have larger 
impact on small statistical samples.  This article might have been
useful for me in reporting results of one aspect from my
doctoral thesis (structure-activity relationship).
.
Most of us who have some familiarity with DNA know it as
a double-stranded helical structure revealing the chemical 
basis of biological differences.  It is interesting to read the 
speculation of Claude Gagna in “Reactions” 6-4-18 about
non-canonical nucleic acid structures and their biological
functions.
.
Finally, I was pleased to see discussion on tandem solar
cells with perovskites which may pave the way for
higher efficiencies that will get me interested in placing
solar panels on my northern city home.
.
STATISTICS:  SIGNIFICANT DIGITS
SOURCE:  S. Deming, Amer. Lab. 6-2018, p. 30

Statistics in the Laboratory:  Significant Digits and the
 Granularity of Data.”
Readers of this blog will recognize my fascination with
Deming’s short reports on statistics.  Here he helps us see 
our way to understand how some data with small sample
size can be interpreted and some questions you can ask
yourself.
.
MOTIFS IN DNA STRUCTURES POSSIBLE MOLECULAR
BIOLOGY IMPACT
SOURCE:  C Gagna, CEN Reactions CEN6-4-18, p. 3
Original citation Stu Borman .
I liked the way this was handled and reemphasized.
An original commentary on a new chemical finding was
remarked in Reactions section not long afterwards.
This line of thinking has broad implications as well.
There should be a practice in journal publication that
does this sort of follow-up to bring strong ideas up
and share them with the chemical community.  I emphasize
this for grad students and post-docs to build ideas of this
nature in your research notebooks.  It is a solid foundation
for your professional careers.
.
PEROVSKITE SOLAR CELLS IN FUTURE TANDEM 
SOLAR CELLS
SOURCE:  M . Peplow, CEN 6-11-18, p. 16
It has been talked about for decades that tandem cells 
absorbing more of the solar spectrum could yield higher
efficiencies.  The development of unique structure 
solar cells, like perovskites, should push efficiencies 
up closer to the 30s and make panels more realistic
if they can have long functional life and limited 
efficiency fading over time.
.
I will be watching this development.
   
1 comment