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From the Northeastern Section of the ACS, focusing on career management and development
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01/10/21
Career Management. Multi-career Paths
Filed under: Recent Posts, Position Searching, Mentoring, Mature professionals, Post-docs, Technicians, Observ. Trends, Undergraduate majors, Alternate Career Paths
Posted by: site admin @ 8:10 am

An email reached me about changing career paths
[from Zackary Crockett].

.
I will try to find a viable link
This can happen to many of us who are trained as
a scientist where technology takes a
hockey-stick-like shift in what methods and areas
of expertise are favored and successful.
.
Your mindset is your key to success, I can attest.
After grad school, I desired to apply myself to an
area where “the rubber meets the road”, practical
areas–  To work in industry
.
After doing this for several decades, in electrochemistry,
applied solid state and polymer chemistry, photography,
statistics, I learned from a national lab researcher that 
later in his career he sought areas where he noticed “gaps”
where he could bring knowledge and experience to bear.
It was a deciding moment.  My targets changed.
.
One area that is not mentioned in the Crockett story is
changes in your health and outlook, as our careers 
extend and our “perceived expertise” and creativity
might not fit our roles.  Nonetheless, I recommend the
article for it may help you.
comments (0)
01/07/21
WOW Factor How to Progress in Job Searches
Filed under: Recent Posts, Interviewing, Mature professionals, Observ. Trends
Posted by: site admin @ 6:41 am

During a career discussion with a Ph.D. who is figuring out
what to do next and what it takes to succeed, we talked about
“wow” factors of candidates that separates outstanding candidates
from good, yet unprepared, candidates.  [I use this term to be
kind to unsuccessful candidates.]

.
What is the “wow” factor and how can candidates achieve it?
.
Forbes described it in a Young Entrepreneurs Council discussion recently. 
-  go the extra distance and trying new avenues pursuing goals
      Curiosity
-  developing new interests by reading and with mentors
       Enthusiasm
-  adjusting to new realities while learning from the past
        Adaptability
-  while they may not grasp the culture of the interviewer, understanding
that culture fit will not be based on real skills on paper but attitude
and assertiveness
          Culture Fit
-  being a self starter and willingness to take direction while adding
in originality
           Doing the right things when no one is looking
=  getting things done in timely basis with a profit motive
           Work Ethic
-  being humble yet having self knowledge about strengths and
weaknesses
             Strengths and weaknesses, what are you doing about it
-  be able to describe your accomplishments in perspective
.
Realize that each one of us needs a tailored elevator pitch tuned to
why you want the position and you are a good candidate.  Also,
have personal reflections revealing wow factor elements that shows
who you are by your behaviors
2 comments
12/28/20
TIP: Linkedin Use during and after Pandemic
Filed under: Recent Posts, Interviewing, Position Searching, Job Offer (Situations), Mature professionals, Post-docs, Technicians, Observ. Trends, Undergraduate majors, Alternate Career Paths
Posted by: site admin @ 4:12 pm

Read a purposeful NYTimes articel by Charlette Cowles

that point out what professionals can and should do 
in Linkedin to help you meet your goals.
In a typical fashion for community networks, she lists
this Microsoft acquisition urges members to remain
active, whatever their current and future situation.
She advises to include true representative entries
into sections– photo, skills, certifications, active
networking, practice interviews, …
See for example.. 
                            2  
                             3  
comments (0)
12/08/20
Career Management 2020.
Filed under: Recent Posts, Mentoring, First Year on Job, Mature professionals, Observ. Trends
Posted by: site admin @ 7:35 pm

Following is a summary of this year’s entries with links.

You can find 2019 Career management HERE .
TIPS   Opt-In Notification Alert
            Recommendation- Things to NOT carry with you
            Detecting Software FAKES Photos, Movies
            COVID related issues and suggestions
            Senior Checking Accounts at Credit Unions
            Recommendation:  That Used to be Us [book]
            Passport Renewal Scam Alert
            Communicating Your Science
            Job Loss Follow Up Actions suggestions
            Independent Academic Consultant suggestion
            Academic.edu suggestion
            
Chemistry Genealogy
Bromine in the 21st Century
USA Jobs.gov  Suggestion
Electrochemistry in Space
Resumes.  Objective Section Suggestion
Recommended Books. 9. 
comments (0)
08/25/20
TIP Communicating Your Science
Filed under: Recent Posts, Position Searching, Mentoring, First Year on Job, Mature professionals, Post-docs, Observ. Trends
Posted by: site admin @ 8:43 am

It is not enough to do good research on topics of interest and
importance.   You need to formulate a strategy to present your
work so that it is read by a wider  audience and referenced
as a meaningful contribution.

S. Muransky contributed a thoughtful piece on considerations
https://axial.acs.org/2017/04/24/highly-read-chemistry-research/
including:

-  attractive title”\
-  storytelling introduction providing implications 
-  broad access (I am a supporter of open-access.  Also, provide
independent links in your online presence sites to google docs,
for example.)
outreach (this is not often promoted in science communities.)
The author wrote:
“…seek out readers.  …Reach out to potential audiences…
It is important to take the time to help a general audience 
understand the bigger picture of whatever you do …social media,
local media, professional media.”
Broad outreach can yield interviews and support future attempts
to scientific collaboration and application.

  
comments (0)
08/11/20
TIP Job Loss Follow up actions
Filed under: Recent Posts, Position Searching, Mentoring, Mature professionals, Observ. Trends
Posted by: site admin @ 4:58 pm

We are into the 6th month of the Pandemic that affects
all industries and the chemical enterprise, including
universities and funded research.  While I could list several
things to do,

The ACS does a creditable job in the following link.
https://www.acs.org/content/dam/acsorg/careers/jobsearch/jobloss/coping-with-job-loss.pdf
Please consider three related things regardless of what stage
your career is in?
  1.  Be prepared for a job loss or unexpected job change.  
Regularly line up your public relations documents and digital
presence.
  2.   Continue to learn new skills and expand your abilities
new and emerging areas, in-demand strength areas and areas
where you know or have been advised you need improvement.
  3.   Extend a helping hand to others.  Let them know you are 
there for them.  Work hard at it, as it is amazing how much this 
will mean no matter where you are in your career growth path.
[mentor others, offer strong recommendations, promote people
for honors, awards and honorary designations, if you are authoring
a technical journal article consider mentioning recognition of 
a teacher or mentor]
1 comment
07/04/20
TIP Academia.edu
Filed under: Recent Posts, Position Searching, Public Relations docs, First Year on Job, Mature professionals, Legal matters, Observ. Trends
Posted by: site admin @ 8:35 am
I get bombarded with you have been cited  notices
in one of my email accounts.  Then I received a half
off subscription email.  This is so common these
days, so I checked into it and share…
Is Academia Edu legit?
It is not. It is a for profit site, who managed to register the “edu”
domain name. They will take your papers (submitted for free)
then sell access to those papers to other people. They also
bombard you with “you have been cited x times” emails but
then you are blocked from seeing who cited you until you pay
a fee.
comments (0)
06/25/20
Chemistry Genealogy
Filed under: Recent Posts, Networking, Mentoring, Mature professionals, Observ. Trends
Posted by: site admin @ 5:47 pm

As mentioned in the last post, something that may be of interest
is for us chemists to learn about our heritage, our familial
heritage.

.
My Academic Genealogy follows the academic paths of my 
senior thesis adviser, Bob Alendoerfer, from SUNY Buffalo, and 
Ernest Grunwald, doctoral thesis adviser from Brandeis University.
.
https://docs.google.com/document/d/18f7-TzTzrYsf3Ro5LlaBWFQNmwsIFg6X/edit
.
My career path information is provided in the Linkedin.com
format, there.
Also, my career path found me involved in a number of
projects and departments for Esso Research/Exxon Research/
ExxonMobil and Polaroid Corporations, the University of
Connecticut Chemistry Department, and as a career
consultant/workshop presenter for American Chemical
Society.
Notable are:
Esso/Exxon   
     -Advanced Battery Project   Zinc Bromine Flow Batteries
     co-workers:  Bhaskara M. L. Rao, Paul Malachesky, Richard
                            Bellows, Tom Whitney, Augie Venero 
                                                 Lithium Ion Batteries
     co-workers:  B. M. L. Rao, M. Stan Whittingham, Bob Hamlen,
                            Joe Shropshire, Bob Thomas, Al Groman
     -Solar Photovoltaic Project:  Polycrystalline Silicon - Solar
     Power Corporation
      co-workers:  Jim Amick, Paul Maruska, Tom Feng, Amal Ghosh
      -Shear Thickening Fluid Technology for Oilfield Problems
      co-workers:  Don Siano, Evelyn Drake
Polaroid           
       Negative Manufacturing:  Silver Halide Emulsion Production
       co-workers:  Ed Brandenburg, Bob Woeller, Mike Riebe,
                             Mary Viola 
                                                  Lafayette Project
       co-workers:  John Cabral, Jackie Pires, Jack Horrigan, Nimi
                              Natan, Sandy Levine, Don Preissler
                                                  Six Sigma Projects
       co-workers:  Chuck Page, , Brad Pires, Barry Mahoney,
                             Freeman Chen, Emil Cuiczak, Mike Young,
                              Bonnie Ferreira, Project Bridge Teachers
                                                   Health, Environmental And Safety
        co-workers:  Dick Chandler, Dave Morreale, Mike Walters,
                              Sean Riley, John LeFevbre,  Tony Pisano, Dick
                               Chutoransky  
University of Connecticut
       Department of Chemistry
        Colleagues. collaborators:  Amy Howell, Steve Suib, Patrick
                               Gordon, Doug Adamson, Marisha Godek, 
                               Chris Eustace, Brenda Eustace, Lisa Balbes 
                               Emilie Hogrebe                               
1 comment
06/24/20
BROMINE IN 21st CENTURY
Filed under: Recent Posts, Mature professionals, Observ. Trends, Alternate Career Paths
Posted by: site admin @ 6:31 am

Let me pose an idea for Chemists that builds on the naming of
 the Periodic Table as the topic of the year a couple of years ago. 
 We all noticed that scientists volunteered a story about their
 favorite element.

.
Throughout my career Bromine has been a common
 denominator of research, manufacturing and enterprise.  So I
 have created a document telling its story that I have pulled
 together from a number of fields with a 21st century perspective…
 that entails knowing about toxicology, ozone depletion,
 biochemistry, and even geology and historical uses and abuses.
.
https://docs.google.com/document/d/18f7-TzTzrYsf3Ro5LlaBWFQNmwsIFg6X/edit
.
Bromine Timeline: 
 https://drive.google.com/file/d/1ByKKnWrieagmFJWSKxaZ86hw6ffvfg00/view?usp=sharing
.
I encourage others to create their own favorite element story and
 I will gladly list their perspectives in this blog.  [To my mind,
 CEN tried to give one page, edited views that missed a valuable
 opportunity to teach about advances and new notions.]
.
Another opportunity I wish to suggest people learning about is
 their “Scientific Genealogy”.  That could be not only the
 university department from which each of us attended and
 graduated from, but also teachers and their teachers, colleagues
 and their contributions.  Think about it and the value it would provide.
4 comments
11/17/19
Recommended Reading. 9.
Filed under: Recent Posts, Mentoring, Leadership, Mature professionals, Legal matters, Observ. Trends
Posted by: site admin @ 9:23 am

David Brooks, The Second Mountain:  A Quest for a Moral Life,
RandomHouse, NY 2019

Rachel Maddow, Blowout:  Corrupted Democracy, Rogue State
Russia, and the Richest Destructive Industry on Earth, Crown, NY, 2019

David E. McCaw, Truth in our Times:  INSIDE THE FIGHT FOR PRESS
FREEDOM IN THE AGE
OF ALTERNATIVE FACTS, All Points Books, NY
 
2019

Timothy Snyder,
THE ROAD TO UNFREEDOM:
  RUSSIA, EUROPE
AMERICA,
Tim Duggan Books, NY
  2018

Preet Bharara, Doing Justice:  A PROSECUTOR’S THOUGHTS ON CRIME
PUNISHMENT
AND THE RULE OF LAW, Alfred Knopf NY 2019

Doris Kearns Goodwin, LEADERSHIP
IN TURBULENT TIMES, Simon &
Schuster, NY, 2018

Clint Watts, Messing with the Enemy:  SURVIVING IN A SOCIAL MEDIA
WORLD OF
HACKERS< TERRORISTS, RUSSIANS ANND FAKE NEWS,
HarperCollins, NY 2018

comments (0)
09/11/19
Hot buttons. 8. Trade secrets
Filed under: Recent Posts, First Year on Job, Mature professionals, Legal matters, Observ. Trends
Posted by: site admin @ 11:15 am

NYT takes up Google-Alphabet-Uber law suit against Anthony
Levandowski regarding trade secrets of files when he left in 2016.

.
The article reports:
The statute defines the class of proprietary property “trade secret” as
“any form and type of financial, business, scientific, technical,
economic or engineering information, including patterns, plans,
compilations, programs or codes, whether tangible or intangible, and
whether or how stored, compiled or memorialized physically,
electronically, graphically, photographically or in writing….
But for information to qualify as such its owner must take
“reasonable measures to keep such information secret and derive
independent economic value from its not being generally known.
.
The prosecutor must also show that transfer was done by improper
means, meaning theft, bribery, misrepresentation, breach or
inducement of a breach of duty to maintain secrecy, or espionage
through electronic or other means.  The statute does not define
reverse engineering or other lawful means as such.
.
Toxic chemical ingredient cannot be a trade secret (Metzger)
Withheld toxicological ingredient information opens possible
  medical treatment pursuit for employee exposure cases (LSU)
Trade secrets and OSHA (Polsinelli)
.
Finnegan describes in more detail than NYT some steps that the
owning company must take to protect the trade secret.  In rapidly
evolving industries not all the privacy steps are taken and documented. 
comments (0)
08/21/19
Hot buttons. 7. Cell phone hacking/identity theft
Filed under: Recent Posts, Mature professionals, Legal matters, Observ. Trends
Posted by: site admin @ 7:50 am

 Reader, whether on cell phone, laptop, tablet or
desk top, you may have a general preference, or not.  Yet,
most will use your cell phones for many communication
and data managing.  In fact you may even control
experiments via cell phones.

.
This post is not offering a recommendation for your choice.
It is aimed at alerting you to the real problem of losing
control of your identity by making public your cell phone
number.  
.
This is something you should carefully limit, like giving
out your id or password.
.
Online hackers are targeting cell phone numbers increasingly
as their use for many things increases.  An article by M.
Stokes highlights a half dozen items that may signal your
cell phone number has been hacked– shorter battery life,
interrupted performance, increased data use, uninitiated
calls or texts from your phone, and mysterious pop-ups and
activity.
-
The Stokes article outlines very nicely how you can be 
trapped into a cell phone hacking situation.  It is worth
reading.
comments (0)
08/11/19
Hot Buttons. 6. “Subscription Model” has taken over choices
Filed under: Recent Posts, Mature professionals, Observ. Trends
Posted by: site admin @ 7:41 am

Do you reckon how many situations you “choose” to accept
a subscription?  Your yearly membership in ACS– subscription
[how many years have you been a member?] , Marriott hotel
chain ‘elite’ member, Netflix subscription, Amazon ‘prime’,
New York Times online subscription, journal subscriptions
(both personal and institution).  Business has adopted the
model that individuals do not ‘own’ things, memberships,
and even personal items.  It is evolving to ‘things-as-a service.’

.
Tien Tzu and others have indicated a change to the time
dimension.
.
Forbes covered the subscription model in some detail showing
how they use AI and collect and parse your personal data for
increased sales without human interaction.
.
Marketing is different for ownership and subscription models.
Ownership is driven by getting you interested in one time 
purchase.  Whereas subscription marketing has 
  -streamlined purchasing, with the company knowing
everything about you
  -advertised easier returns and breaking off subscription,
if satisfaction is not met 
  -with the aim to keep you as a subscriber, there a regular
upgrades and improvements, new content and features
  -many subscription services allow you to pick specific
items for your needs and wants.
.  
Know that the chemical enterprise is already deeply 
involved in the subscription model.  R&D is likely to
be headed there.
comments (0)
07/29/19
Hot buttons. 5. Where do you get reliable data, information and conclusions?
Filed under: Recent Posts, Mature professionals, Observ. Trends
Posted by: site admin @ 1:56 pm

It is just as hard now, as it was in the past, to assess reports
of data.  In the past, one would have to wait until there was
enough sample size using the specific question.  So often
now we need to assess the bias inherent in the source.

.
[If data is published in peer reviewed journals by a variety
of established authors, it is likely worth using the results and
conclusions.   What must be factored in is that publications support
awarding of grants and promotions.  Publications represent
a time-honored path.  Things can be proven wrong, but rarely
do these kinds of results find the light of day.]
.
Think about business news or about scientific data, hypotheses
and conclusions in “news.”  So much is hampered by bias from
various sources.  In science, we speak about the importance of
controls or control charts and sample size.  The logic of
conclusions and validity of models also play essential roles.
.
There is an equivalence in the non-scientific world of looking
at ‘news cycles’ and marketing of ideas.  In addition, we are 
encouraged to realize the emotional content and repeat frequency
with catchy easy phrases that sway human thinking when there
is not an equally persuasive rebuttal.
.
There was a time when audiences believed that there was an
editor and fact checker for what is reported in media.  It seems
like this is no longer the case as the money driven enterprises
seek ready-viewers and ready-readers.  So common now
summaries of habits miss that dimension.
.
Example:  A key ingredient of the lead or initial paragraph
states the interpretation of polls .  Polls represent timely, novel,
 and 
conflict-ridden, meeting standards of newsworthiness.
Nonetheless, polls depend on the question raised, options of
answers, the sample size and variety, timing and context.  
They are of a different “reality.”
.
Readers should be encouraged to use our science tools
to report, consume and believe the news we pay attention to.
It is of high value to highlight journalism best practices 
using the scientific method.
2 comments
07/22/19
Hot buttons. 4. Stress in Grad School, Post-doc, and Career Positions
Filed under: Recent Posts, Mentoring, Mature professionals, Observ. Trends
Posted by: site admin @ 2:17 pm

Debilitating illness related to stress may not happen to you
for a long time.  It happened to me, a Ph.D. after 3 1/2 years
of grad school with 3 hot offers a month after my defense and
a meaningful 44 year career in three major fields and an
unbelievable post career retirement.  

.
Working out at a gym on an elliptical machine, I fainted (medical
term syncope) because blood did not get to my brain due to
blocked arteries.  Ends up a cardiac cathetarization found
blockage in my main artery in the heart leading to open heart
triple bypass surgery.  That was a year ago and resulted in a
major life change.  Back to near normal again, thankfully.
.
What did I learn?
.
Take care of yourself.  Manage your diet, weight, physical exercise,
annual physical.  Even that is not enough, for I did that.  There are
genetic contributions but it is occurring more and more frequently
as we live longer.
.
Family and friendships make all the difference.  I believe it is
part of taking care of yourself by looking after others in your
close circle.  The stresses I see grad students point out are real.  It
is important to factor that element into your career path choice. 
 [Credit UC-Davis for recognizing this.]
.
Time management and organization.  To me it seems to start with
goal setting and prioritization.  Whether it is in grad school, post-
doc, or ina part time or full time career path position, figure out what
it is you wish to attain or grow or benefit from your effort. 
Recognize any significant goal requires effort.  The higher the goal,
can say something to others about you.
Work hard to develop strong personal relations with your adviser,
supervisor and mentors.  Your success is part of what they wish for
as well.  Share your goals with them and ask for advice.  You will
be surprised by how you can be helped.  Then when it is your turn,
pay it forward to others.
.
Stress is a root cause of diseases.  WebMD points our eight stress
inducing medical issues:
  •   Heart disease. …
  •   Asthma. …
  •   Diabetes. …
  •   Headaches. …
  •   Depression and anxiety. …
  •   Gastrointestinal problems. …
  •   Alzheimer’s disease.
  • Other conditions related to stress include:
  •   The common cold. …
  •   Weight gain. …
  •   Slower healing. …
  •   Sleep dysfunction. …
  •   Depression. …
  •   Ulcers and other stomach problems. …
  •   Back, neck and shoulder pain.
Don’t take things for granted.!   Recognize subtle things
happen when you are stressed and it may not happen 
instantly.
1 comment
07/11/19
Hot Buttons. 3. Women in Scientific Leadership Roles
Filed under: Recent Posts, Mentoring, Leadership, Mature professionals, Observ. Trends, Alternate Career Paths
Posted by: site admin @ 10:12 am

In the days in mid-20th century, women were a smaller
fraction of class members in math, geology, chemistry,
and physics
classes in many departments.  This population
dynamic resulted in fewer women in scientific leadership
(decision-making) roles.

.
Implementation of programs to reach more representative
fraction of balance in leadership can benefit from thoughtful
attention, like Melinda Gates book 
The Moment of Lift: How Empowering Women
Changes the World
She argues that there are unseen benefits by broadening
the equality balance.  While many organizations feel it is
nice to do but do not sense the “pipeline” permits more of
the perceived minority.  In fact it is quite analogous to people
of non-Americans natives in emerging industries– their
different approaches and perspectives offers great benefits. 
It often starts with men and men in families.
.
Ms. Gates writes about how Bill Gates driving his children
to school a couple of days a week moved other families
to share the transportation task in their families as well.
1 comment
06/14/19
Watch-Outs. 110. H3+, High Pressure elements, Retractions
Filed under: Recent Posts, Mentoring, Mature professionals, Observ. Trends
Posted by: site admin @ 6:07 am

One issue of C&EN contained several noteworthy items.

The first of three was appropriately tri-hydrogen ion reported
a half dozen years ago by Michele Pavanello in Phys. Rev. Lett.
The story about the incidental discovery of the spectral
profile led to identification of this ion’s significance in
interstellar chemistry. (p. 18 of issue)
.
Martin Rahm’s group continues to reveal interesting changes
in properties of elements at higher pressures.  It changed 
my thinking just like hyperconjugation did when I was
an undergraduate.  You mean elements have different 
reactivities at higher pressures!  Wow.  (p. 11 of issue)
.
The article on retractions caught my attention (p. 16)
since that is related to a significant topic in my 
Professionalism course.  We had exercises, both intentional
and unintentional, on ethics, behaviors and what to do
if you observe something.  Plagiarism heads the list of 
root causes of retractions and one item that the article
missed that is quite important is that there are truth telling
plagiarism detection software that are free and have
a cost that everyone who writes for an audience should
be aware of.  Several instances I have remarked on 
assignments that the work looks like a copy from 
another author, would you like to put things in your own
words?
comments (0)
05/26/19
Gig Economy. Scientific Writing Editing Review
Filed under: Recent Posts, Position Searching, Mature professionals, Legal matters, Observ. Trends, Alternate Career Paths
Posted by: site admin @ 6:12 am

Say, you have strong technical writing skills in English.
Say, you have time (more than 4 hours a day) and credentials
that clearly show proven skills in improving technical
communications.

.
Well, there is a need, that some societies promote, is available
It is an interesting avocation for some, but I am not advocating
it.  As I contacted an excellent technical writer to seek her 
“take” on this proposal.  As an article by Joanne Chen observes,
while many people look at on-site reviews for determining
a purchase decision, objective assessment from a trusted 
colleague will do better for you.
.
I shared Enago’s offering with Lisa Balbes and bring up several
of her noteworthy comments.  The remuneration is sub-standard, 
sometimes it is not equitable and not timely, the feedback on
performance can seem arbitrary, without recourse..  Other,
online reviews also point out caution.
.
She wisely points out that payment in advance and individual
contracts with stated expectations can avoid many troubles.
comments (0)
05/20/19
Job Loss, Job Search and Retirement
Filed under: Recent Posts, Mentoring, Mature professionals, Technicians, Observ. Trends
Posted by: site admin @ 10:58 am

Now looking in the rear view mirror on this, it is possible
to offer a perspective.

.
One of the key things is to join and participate in professional
societies.  This was a strong recommendation of a former
boss at Exxon Research, Jim Amick.  Our conversations led me
to pursue roles that might provide experience in leadership and
networking.  It was not broadly spoken about at my first two
positions and it was not easy to get approval to attend meetings.
.
Yet when my turn for facing the music of job loss came,
it was my good fortune that managers encouraged me to 
attend a national ACS meeting to participate in the job clearinghouse.
That led to several interviews and offers.
.
Weathering the storms of corporate life is mostly being in the
right place at the right time, by good relationship and
skill building.  Accepting roles that are not part of my formal
background did stretch employment longevity.  But looking for
volunteer opportunities 
for the common good– chairing meeting
sessions, reviewing articles, 
volunteering as local section member
at national meetings and then
learning from successes of others
Then, help others pursue their career aspirations.
.
As I saw happen to even the most talented colleagues, cut backs occur.
Through no fault of their own I saw many people get “sacked” and 
pick themselves up and resume their career somewhere else.  My
content here is to bring up end of career observations, as are described
in Mark Miller’s article and podcast.  [LISTEN TO THE PODCAST!]
.
 - Center for Retirement Research (BC) found 37% retire earlier
(55% fail to reach age 66 target)
 -  one quarter of loss of jobs due to health (UMichigan,
Sanzenbacher)
 -  Workers 55 and older:  unemployment rate 2.6%, but long term
unemployment of >27 weeks, is 26.6%,  [that is, if you get laid off,
recovering is less likely]
 -  Sporadic income is hard to manage, but expecting to reach your
retirement goals set early in life, is getting harder and harder.
.
Pointers from Mark Miller
1. Assess your health and employment statistics in viable fields, as
time goes on.  
2. Create interim plans including health care insurance and alternate
income streams that match outflows.
3. Fees and costs of retirement accounts.  Look for financial advisers
who pursue your goals [interview several and don’t just depend on
robo-investing]
comments (0)
04/17/19
Habits. Top four that enhance your self esteem
Filed under: Recent Posts, Interviewing, Position Searching, First Year on Job, Mature professionals, Observ. Trends
Posted by: site admin @ 7:06 am

Many times authors write about and speak about habits that
will help you be successful.  As we come to appreciate,
winning and “success” are fleeting until the next event in a
competitive world.

.
I enjoy much of what David Brooks writes in his NYT
editorials.  One of the latest is about 2 mountains we face
in our lives–

“If the first mountain is about building up the ego and
defining the self, the second is about shedding the ego and
dissolving the self. If the first mountain is about acquisition,
the second
 mountain is about contribution.

On the first mountain, personal freedom is celebrated
keeping your options open, absence of restraint. But the
perfectly free life is the unattached and unremembered life.
Freedom is not an ocean you want to swim in;  it it a river
you want to cross so that you can
plant yourself on the other
side.
.
So the person on the second mountain is making
commitments.  
People who have made a commitment to a
town, a person, 
an institution or a cause have cast their lot

and burned the 
bridges behind them. They have made a
promise without 
expecting
a return. They are all in.

.
I can now usually recognize first and second mountain people.

The former have an
ultimate allegiance to self; the latter have
an ultimate allegiance to some
commitment.”
.
Supporting this are habits that build self-confidence and
lead to commitment. [taken from ]
1.  delay celebration and develop a ‘reserve capacity’ to persist
2.  make choices and have the mental agility to have a back-up
if first choice does not work
3.  organize details, set priorities and understand root causes
of shortcomings
4.  be kind even in the face of rudeness, bitterness and
unhappiness

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